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NASA Exposes Their Apollo Moon Landing Hoax!


Duane Daman
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The image you have provided is from the Apollo 16 UV telescope.

Where are the rest of the images ? ...That image could have just as easily been manipulated like the NASA composite image that started the thread. There is nothing showing the lunar landscape in any of the images and the UV Expt was specifically set up like that !

Please provide the photos you claim Apollo 15 photographed from the CM of the stars.

From his book- "Two Sides Of The Moon"

p105 "What I saw as the hatch opened took my breath away. Night was turning to day. The small portion of the Earth's surface I could see as I leant back was deep blue. The sky beyond the curving horizon was dark, illuminated with bright stars as I looked due south towards the South Pole. I cranked my neck back until it hurt. I wanted to see more. Moving at 18,000mph, the scene below me rapidly began to change. Very soon the outline of the African continent came into view."

ALL Leonovs SPACEWALKING paintings included STARS!

thThevgDSCF0093.jpg

How could Leonovs eyes dark adjust above the much more reflective daylight side Earth while also easily seeing the stars above the atmosphere?

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The JSC Digital Image server is coming up as down for me; I'll give you some other images as soon as possible. I've sent an e-mail to the NASA people responsible, so hopefully they can get the problem fixed.

There are one or two other images which show the lunar horizon and the sky... but they don't show stars because the exposure has been set for photography of the surface, not the sky. Exactly the same thing we have been saying.

Here is an image I took of the Moon during the lunar eclipse.

Where are the stars?

2007_0828eclipse0009.jpg

Answer: the exposure settings to capture the subject of the image (the Moon) meant that the stars did not register.

Re: Leonov - yes, some astronauts / cosmonauts report seeing stars, others don't. There can often be a reason for this; here is a hint... when were the EVAs most often conducted?

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Here's another example. Same night, same camera. I was trying to show the "red moon". I was able to show it (I have only a cheapy tripod, and it shows) but in doing so the other part of the Moon is too bright for any detail to be seen... and still no stars are visible, though I could see them myself (I has been outside for quite some time).

2007_0828eclipse0030.jpg

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Your two photographs of the Moon were taken in Earth's atmosphere , so they have NOTHING to do with photographs taken in the vacuum of space from lunar orbit or from the surface of the Moon .

I will wait to see the numerous photos of stars that Apollo allegedy took from lunar orbit.

But even if you do manage to produce them , they will still in no way prove why the Apollo astronots didn't take the 30 seconds needed to photograph them from the lunar surface , or see any either .

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Your two photographs of the Moon were taken in Earth's atmosphere , so they have NOTHING to do with photographs taken in the vacuum of space from lunar orbit or from the surface of the Moon .

I will wait to see the numerous photos of stars that Apollo allegedy took from lunar orbit.

But even if you do manage to produce them , they will still in no way prove why the Apollo astronots didn't take the 30 seconds needed to photograph them from the lunar surface , or see any either .

For starters they would have needed a tripod. The extra weight would have meant sacrificing something else. Presumably it was decided that there was no scientific benefit at all of taking photos of stars from the moon using non-specialist equipment, since far better images can be obtained using the enormous telescopes we have here on earth.

Apollo 16 did of course take a specialist camera and a tripod, for the purpose of taking photos of stars (and the earth) in UV. There is a scientific benefit to doing this on the moon: the earth's atmophere filters out most UV.

I'm unaware of photos of stars being taken from lunar orbit using the Hasselblads - the exposure times would presumably be far too long? Certainly the photos of earth don't show any stars that I recall, which is what you would expect given the shutter speed/aperture settings.

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Attached photo taken by some Apollo apologist at Apollohoax, with the following settings.

<image removed>

The image was removed by the request of the photographer, who objected to it being used without permission.

Now why couldn't any Apollo astronot FROM ANY MISSION have done exactly the same thing? ....Were they told not to? ... Were they advised to not mention what the view of the stars was like from the vacuum of space as well ?

Because according to Leonovs paintings and recollections they quite obviously should have!

ALL SHOWING THE STARS ABOVE DAYLIGHT EARTH.

http://www.orbit.zkm.de/?q=node/251

What do you think may have been so special about Leonovs irises that he could easily dark adjust to be able to see the stars in a vacuum plus the extremely bright Earth (compared to the lunar surface) at the same time? ... but the Apollo astronots never could ??

BOOTLEG VODKA CONSUMPTION PERHAPS ?

Edited by Evan Burton
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Here are a selection of images from a recent space shuttle mission that should put this issue to bed as far as photography is concerned.

Firstly, this image taken on the daylight side. No stars visible.

s116e05364.jpg

This one is taken as the orbit passes over the terminator. No stars visible.

s116e06753.jpg

Here's one taken on the nightside of earth. No stars visible, but we can see lights from cities, as well as faint Aurora Borealis.

s116e07663.jpg

Lastly, this one was taken on the nightside of earth, with a long-exposure time (as witnessed by the streaks caused by the lights form earth). Aurora Borealis much brighter. Stars are now visible due to the longer exposure time.

s116e07308.jpg

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Now why couldn't any Apollo astronot FROM ANY MISSION have done exactly the same thing? ....Were they told not to? ... Were they advised to not mention what the view of the stars was like from the vacuum of space as well ?

I don't know how many times we have to say this Duane: because those images could be taken from Earth, or from a dedicated orbital platform. The Apollo programme was about lunar exploration. That why they took photos of it, both from the surface and from lunar orbit.

That's why they collected samples from the surface. That's why they left experiments there. It was about the Moon.

Photography from the Moon offered a few benefits - but not enough to warrant displacing other experiments / tasks that could NOT be done from Earth orbit or without a dedicated lunar mission (manned or unmanned).

Dave, there was a stellar photography experiment on Apollos 15 and 16, with a pack mounted in the SIM bay IIRC. I'm waiting for the JSC server to come back online to get some other images. See previous posts about the details and NSSDC ID.

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I've managed to get some data regarding this.

Firstly, that image of the stars. I believe it was done by an astronomer from the University of Alabama by the name of William Keel. The image can be found on his website here.

A similar image is AS16-123-19650.

There is also an article which discusses the photographs.

There are also False Colour UV images of the Earth taken from the lunar surface.

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Now why couldn't any Apollo astronot FROM ANY MISSION have done exactly the same thing? ....Were they told not to? ... Were they advised to not mention what the view of the stars was like from the vacuum of space as well ?

I don't know how many times we have to say this Duane: because those images could be taken from Earth, or from a dedicated orbital platform. The Apollo programme was about lunar exploration. That why they took photos of it, both from the surface and from lunar orbit.

That's why they collected samples from the surface. That's why they left experiments there. It was about the Moon.

Photography from the Moon offered a few benefits - but not enough to warrant displacing other experiments / tasks that could NOT be done from Earth orbit or without a dedicated lunar mission (manned or unmanned).

WHAT DO YOU MEAN DISPLACING OTHER EXPERMENTS ?? ... THEY COULD HAVE EASILY SET UP A 30 SEC EXPOSURE TO TAKE STARS PHOTOS AT ANY TIME DURING ANY OF THE MISSIONS....

AT THE END OF AN EVA , WHEN PACKING UP, WHEN DRIVING TO STATIONS ON APOLLO 15, 16 , AND 17. ... SIMPLY SET THE CAMERA UP DURING TRAVERSE AND TAKE A PHOTO WHEN THE ROVER STOPS... WHAT A PICTURE! .. HALFWAY UP HADLEY RILLE WITH STARS ABOVE OVEREXPOSED LUNAR SCENES.

DO NOT INSULT ANYBODYS INTELLIGENCE BY SUGGESTING NASA WOULDN'T HAVE BEEN THE SLIGHTEST BIT INTERESTED IN STAR PHOTOGRAPHS FROM THE MOON.

THOUSANDS UPON THOUSANDS OF EVA ACTIVITY PHOTOS AND NOT A SINGLE ONE WITH STARS !

NASA=OBSERVATORIES=SKYLAB=HUBBLE=NO STAR PHOTOS FROM THE MOON=LUDICROUS!

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I've managed to get some data regarding this.

Firstly, that image of the stars. I believe it was done by an astronomer from the University of Alabama by the name of William Keel. The image can be found on his website here.

A similar image is AS16-123-19650.

There is also an article which discusses the photographs.

There are also False Colour UV images of the Earth taken from the lunar surface.

WHAT'S INTERESTING IN THAT ARTICLE IS THE TD-1 SATELLITE THAT WAS LAUNCHED A MONTH BEFORE APOLLO 16 ALLEGEDLY TOOK THOSE IMAGES FROM THE SURFACE OF THE MOON... TD-1 WHICH WAS SCANNING THE SKY FOR THE EXACT SAME BRIGHT UV STARS... HOW UNFORTUNATE THAT APOLLO 11,

12, 14, AND 15 MISSED OUT ON THE UV TELESCOPE AND COINCIDENTALLY A SATELLITE JUST HAPPENED TO BE SCANNING AT THE "EXACT" SAME TIME.

http://heasarc.gsfc.nasa.gov/docs/heasarc/...ions/td-1a.html

WHATS ALSO OF NOTE IS THE UV TELESCOPE WAS SET UP SPECIFICALLY TO NOT CAPTURE ANY LUNAR SCENERY IN THE IMAGES.

SO WE HAVE THOUSANDS OF PHOTOS ALL SUPPOSEDLY TAKEN ON THE LUNAR SURFACE AND NOT A SINGLE ONE FEATURES STARS.

AND WE HAVE UV STARS PHOTOS ALLEGEDLY TAKEN BY THE APOLLO 16 TELESCOPE WITH NOT ONE IDENTIFABLE LUNAR FEATURE-TOP OF MOUNTAIN ETC!

INCREDIBLE !

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I contacted William Keel and asked him about the images. He responded (with permission granted for publishing the response):

Back on the subject of TD-1 - that spacecraft did not carry a camera, but a scanning arrangement of photomultiplier tubes which could either sample the sky directly or at the output of a spectrograph. The direct sampling saw starlight through a slit 1.7 by 17.3 arcminutes in size, while the spectrograph analyzed a region 17.3 by 11.9 arcminutes. One can certainly synthesize images from scanned data, but one would need additional processing or information to avoid position errors along the length of the slit (which should be manifest in images at the S201 resolution).

There is also the issue (which I haven't yet followed up) of just when the TD-1 scan pattern would have carried its field of view across all the regions observed by Apollo 16, noting that the S201 images were published within a few months of the mission (Septembr 1972, IIRC, when the Science article appeared).

Edited by Evan Burton
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AT THE END OF AN EVA , WHEN PACKING UP, WHEN DRIVING TO STATIONS ON APOLLO 15, 16 , AND 17. ... SIMPLY SET THE CAMERA UP DURING TRAVERSE AND TAKE A PHOTO WHEN THE ROVER STOPS... WHAT A PICTURE! .. HALFWAY UP HADLEY RILLE WITH STARS ABOVE OVEREXPOSED LUNAR SCENES.

I think you have a typo there. You said "OVEREXPOSED LUNAR SCENES" when you must have meant "solid white area unrecognizable as anything specific".

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AT THE END OF AN EVA , WHEN PACKING UP, WHEN DRIVING TO STATIONS ON APOLLO 15, 16 , AND 17. ... SIMPLY SET THE CAMERA UP DURING TRAVERSE AND TAKE A PHOTO WHEN THE ROVER STOPS... WHAT A PICTURE! .. HALFWAY UP HADLEY RILLE WITH STARS ABOVE OVEREXPOSED LUNAR SCENES.

I think you have a typo there. You said "OVEREXPOSED LUNAR SCENES" when you must have meant "solid white area unrecognizable as anything specific".

No , it doesn't need to be recognizable as anything specific , as long as the horizon and lay of the lunar surface can be made out.

As well as those elusive "STARS" of course!

Here's a simulated Vegas example of what the lunar surface would have looked like if any of the astronots had bothered to take any photographs of the stars above an overexposed surface.

STARSVEGASIMAGE3.jpg

Astronomers from all over the world would have jumped at the chance to have seen a sight like that and nasa knew it .... but for some VERY strange reason , the guys allegedly standing on the Moon decided to not take any star photographs , even though they should have been able to .

So the excuse to not take take photos of stars without an atmosphere on the Moon , regardless of overexposing everything else is completely ludicrous.

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