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Aluminum---And the Correct Answer Is:


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First off, a short review of the problem, along with Ken's answer:

http://groups.google.com/group/alt.conspir...bb80d1d95ca2d58

>> Ken Rahn

> A few questions:

> 1. The Connally wrist fragment has I believe 8.1 PPM of Aluminum, yet

> CE 399 has 0.000 PPM of Aluminum - "None Detected". This would seem

> to indicate that CE 399 was made in a metal melt that had no Aluminum

> present, while the wrist fragment came from a bullet made from a melt

> that contained Aluminum. How can we reasonably say that the wrist

> fragment came from that CE 399?

I offer you the same advice I offered to Ben Holmes just now. Read

Guinn's

testimony to the HSCA and his accompanying report, and you will

understand

the NAA of bullet lead much better. Al has virtualy no tracer power in

lead,

and so cannot be used to conclude anything. Guinn just included its

concentrations for completeness, which may have been a mistake because

it

has thrown well-intentioned people like you off the track.

> 2. CE 399 and the wrist fragment also show a huge variation in Copper

> PPM - 994 vs. 58. There are also large differences in Sodium and

> Chlorine. Don't these facts also point to this fragment NOT coming

> from the CE 399 bullet?

If you look at Guinn's full record for Cu, you will see that it is

very

erratic. It is not terribly helpful in bullet lead.

My comments for Na and Cl are the same as for Al above.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------­-----------------------------------

Now! I most certainly would have thought that a "shooter" would have

known the answer to this huge enigma, in that bullets normally have

four component parts.

1. The projectile/bullet

2. The propellant/powder

3. The Casing

4. The Primer/Cap

---------------------------------------------------------------------------­-----------------------------------

http://library.med.utah.edu/WebPath/TUTORI...UNS/GUNGSR.html

The major primer elements are lead (Pb), barium (Ba), or antimony

(Sb). Usually, all three are present. Less common elements include

aluminum (Al), sulfur (S), tin (Sn), calcium (Ca), potassium (K),

chlorine (Cl), or silicon (Si).

---------------------------------------------------------------------------­-------------------------------------------------------------

http://www.alliantpowder.com/beginner/beginner_reloading.htm

Primer: A small, self-contained metalic ignition cap at the center of

the base of the ammunition case. When struck by the firing pin, the

primer combusts, sending sparks through the flashhole of the case, and

ignites the powder charge. In centerfire cartridges, primers are

cylinder-shaped components composed of ignition chemicals, a cup and

an anvil.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------­-----------------------------------------------------------------

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  • 3 months later...
First off, a short review of the problem, along with Ken's answer:

http://groups.google.com/group/alt.conspir...bb80d1d95ca2d58

>> Ken Rahn

> A few questions:

> 1. The Connally wrist fragment has I believe 8.1 PPM of Aluminum, yet

> CE 399 has 0.000 PPM of Aluminum - "None Detected". This would seem

> to indicate that CE 399 was made in a metal melt that had no Aluminum

> present, while the wrist fragment came from a bullet made from a melt

> that contained Aluminum. How can we reasonably say that the wrist

> fragment came from that CE 399?

I offer you the same advice I offered to Ben Holmes just now. Read

Guinn's

testimony to the HSCA and his accompanying report, and you will

understand

the NAA of bullet lead much better. Al has virtualy no tracer power in

lead,

and so cannot be used to conclude anything. Guinn just included its

concentrations for completeness, which may have been a mistake because

it

has thrown well-intentioned people like you off the track.

> 2. CE 399 and the wrist fragment also show a huge variation in Copper

> PPM - 994 vs. 58. There are also large differences in Sodium and

> Chlorine. Don't these facts also point to this fragment NOT coming

> from the CE 399 bullet?

If you look at Guinn's full record for Cu, you will see that it is

very

erratic. It is not terribly helpful in bullet lead.

My comments for Na and Cl are the same as for Al above.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------­-----------------------------------

Now! I most certainly would have thought that a "shooter" would have

known the answer to this huge enigma, in that bullets normally have

four component parts.

1. The projectile/bullet

2. The propellant/powder

3. The Casing

4. The Primer/Cap

---------------------------------------------------------------------------­-----------------------------------

http://library.med.utah.edu/WebPath/TUTORI...UNS/GUNGSR.html

The major primer elements are lead (Pb), barium (Ba), or antimony

(Sb). Usually, all three are present. Less common elements include

aluminum (Al), sulfur (S), tin (Sn), calcium (Ca), potassium (K),

chlorine (Cl), or silicon (Si).

---------------------------------------------------------------------------­-------------------------------------------------------------

http://www.alliantpowder.com/beginner/beginner_reloading.htm

Primer: A small, self-contained metalic ignition cap at the center of

the base of the ammunition case. When struck by the firing pin, the

primer combusts, sending sparks through the flashhole of the case, and

ignites the powder charge. In centerfire cartridges, primers are

cylinder-shaped components composed of ignition chemicals, a cup and

an anvil.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------­-----------------------------------------------------------------

Again, for those who are attempting to unravel the Spectrographic confusion, the following may be of some assistance in explaining how aluminum ultimately ended up on the lead sample tested.

http://whokilledjfk.net/Rifle.htm

APPENDIX C

BACKGROUND DATA ON MANNLICHER CARCANO

AMMUNITION

"The primer cup was made of"

"and it's main components were"----- "7% aluminum powder"

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

All of which would serve to indicate that that fragment of lead which was tested and revealed the aluminum was the 4.5mm width/oval section of lead which is exposed at the base of the bullet and which portion of lead would receive residue from the cartridge's primer as well as propellant ignition.

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First off, a short review of the problem, along with Ken's answer:

http://groups.google.com/group/alt.conspir...bb80d1d95ca2d58

>> Ken Rahn

> A few questions:

> 1. The Connally wrist fragment has I believe 8.1 PPM of Aluminum, yet

> CE 399 has 0.000 PPM of Aluminum - "None Detected". This would seem

> to indicate that CE 399 was made in a metal melt that had no Aluminum

> present, while the wrist fragment came from a bullet made from a melt

> that contained Aluminum. How can we reasonably say that the wrist

> fragment came from that CE 399?

I offer you the same advice I offered to Ben Holmes just now. Read

Guinn's

testimony to the HSCA and his accompanying report, and you will

understand

the NAA of bullet lead much better. Al has virtualy no tracer power in

lead,

and so cannot be used to conclude anything. Guinn just included its

concentrations for completeness, which may have been a mistake because

it

has thrown well-intentioned people like you off the track.

> 2. CE 399 and the wrist fragment also show a huge variation in Copper

> PPM - 994 vs. 58. There are also large differences in Sodium and

> Chlorine. Don't these facts also point to this fragment NOT coming

> from the CE 399 bullet?

If you look at Guinn's full record for Cu, you will see that it is

very

erratic. It is not terribly helpful in bullet lead.

My comments for Na and Cl are the same as for Al above.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------­-----------------------------------

Now! I most certainly would have thought that a "shooter" would have

known the answer to this huge enigma, in that bullets normally have

four component parts.

1. The projectile/bullet

2. The propellant/powder

3. The Casing

4. The Primer/Cap

---------------------------------------------------------------------------­-----------------------------------

http://library.med.utah.edu/WebPath/TUTORI...UNS/GUNGSR.html

The major primer elements are lead (Pb), barium (Ba), or antimony

(Sb). Usually, all three are present. Less common elements include

aluminum (Al), sulfur (S), tin (Sn), calcium (Ca), potassium (K),

chlorine (Cl), or silicon (Si).

---------------------------------------------------------------------------­-------------------------------------------------------------

http://www.alliantpowder.com/beginner/beginner_reloading.htm

Primer: A small, self-contained metalic ignition cap at the center of

the base of the ammunition case. When struck by the firing pin, the

primer combusts, sending sparks through the flashhole of the case, and

ignites the powder charge. In centerfire cartridges, primers are

cylinder-shaped components composed of ignition chemicals, a cup and

an anvil.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------­-----------------------------------------------------------------

Again, for those who are attempting to unravel the Spectrographic confusion, the following may be of some assistance in explaining how aluminum ultimately ended up on the lead sample tested.

http://whokilledjfk.net/Rifle.htm

APPENDIX C

BACKGROUND DATA ON MANNLICHER CARCANO

AMMUNITION

"The primer cup was made of"

"and it's main components were"----- "7% aluminum powder"

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

All of which would serve to indicate that that fragment of lead which was tested and revealed the aluminum was the 4.5mm width/oval section of lead which is exposed at the base of the bullet and which portion of lead would receive residue from the cartridge's primer as well as propellant ignition.

Which ultimately, should lead one to question the disappearance of the lead fragment from CE840 which was "cone-shaped" with a flat base that measures approximately 4.5mm in diameter, and which fragment had elongated scratch markings along it's long axis.

And, which fragment was found in the left rear floorboard of the Presidential Lilmo and weighed in at 0.9 grain when FBI Agent Robert Frazier weighed it and placed it in the category as "Poss C1" (possibly from C1/aka CE399), and which fragment FBI Agent William Sullivan removed from the FBI ballistics laboratory, never to be seen (or at least recognized) again.

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