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FBI Behavorial Sciences Unit - 7 Step Investigative Process for the Apprehension of a Serial Killer.

1) Evaluation of criminal acts.

2) Comprehensive evaluaton of the crime scenes.

3) Comprehensive analysis of the victims.

4) Evaluation of the police and investigative reports.

5) Evaluation of medical examinar autopsy protocols.

6) Development of a profile with critical offender characteristics.

7) Investigative suggestions predicated on the above.

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FBI Behavorial Sciences Unit - 7 Step Investigative Process for the Apprehension of a Serial Killer.

1) Evaluation of criminal acts.

"The job of the investigator is to discover...what specific offense has been committed...how it was committed, by whom it was committed, where it was committed, when it was committed and, under certain circumstances, why it was committed....He must have the ability to stick to a task in spite of the monotony of it and in spite of many obsitcals....He must have a certain native abilitly, an intelligence which enables him to acquire certain information easily and readily and which enables him to use this information. He should have a capacity to think through situations....The investigator must be as intelligent as the offender.." (From Techniques for the Crime Investigator, By William Dienstein; Charles C. Thomas, Publisher, Springfield, Ill., 1952, 1965).

"A primary factor of personal integrity is a sincere desire to arrive at a conclusion based upon facts. The investigator must be free of bias or prejudic, and cannot let these emotions interfere with his objective efforts to arrive at the facts..."

"Another requisite is an understanding of people and the environment in which they live. It is through this understanding that an investigator is often able to develop leads which might otherwise escape attention. The investigator must know what prompts people to act as they do in various situations. He must know the weaknesses and strength of people so that he can use them to his advantage, particularly during interrogations. A knowledge of the psychology of human behavior is essential to an investigator...He must possess that knack of being able to get along with people, that quality which enables people to confide in him...."

"Investigation requires thinking and acting, acting based on continuous thinking. One mistake may make invalid months of tedious effort. An investigator canot seek personal aggrandizement...does not seek personal credit, but rather seeks to give credit to others who have assisted him...Commendation is due them for their part in the administration of justice."

2) Comprehensive evaluaton of the crime scenes.

"The clues that lead to the solution of an offense lie at the scene of the crime. Therefore, the investigator must be aware of what consitutes evidence, what are the clues, where they may be found, and how they may be protected, collected and preseved."

"The most common error made by investigators is to pass up evidence as immaterial and unnecessary. Later, the evidence so passed may be of great importance. No investigator can tell what observation will be important in the future."

3) Comprehensive analysis of the victims.

"Motive for murder can be divided into seven specific groups: 1) Profit; 2) Elemination; 3) Revenge; 4) Jealousy; 5) Conviction; 6) Sadism; 7) Sex....Removal of the person who happens to be 'in the way' is the determining factor in a great number of murders. In the true elemination murder the continued existence of the victim is inconvenient or dangerous to the killer." (The Detection of Murder - A Handbook for Police Officers, Detectives, Coroners, Judges and Attorneys, by Paul B. Weston and William F. Kessler).

"One of the most important factors in an initial investigation is to reconstruct the last hours, even the last days, of the deceased. Who saw him last? With whom did he have his last meal? Who spoke to him over the telephone in his last hours? Where he went and what he did in the period preceeding death are what must be reconstructed. And it is the reconstruction of this period that most often reveals the true facst surrounding unexplained and unexpected death."

"Professional killers do not usually kill for any other motive than elemination...However in 90% of these killing the persons who have the motive for the killing never handle the gun that fires the fatal shots, nor drive the car that may have been used in the killing. They are involved in the conspiracy and are guilty of murder because they procured the 'trigger men' who did the actual killing, but they have an alibi to prove they were many miles away from the scene of death at the time of the homicide...More than likely the triggermen were imported from some other town to do the killing and return home as soon as the 'job' is completed."

4) Evaluation of the police and investigative reports.

"When evidence is presented factually and graphically, the judge and jury are in a far better position to arrive at a logical conclusion than if the evidence is indefinate and inaccurate. There is no danger of securing too much accurate and detailed information about a situation that is the subject of the investigation. The trial of a criminal case should not be a guessing match in which witnesses and investigators alike participate. The trial should be an accurate and scientific presentation of all the facts."

5) Evaluation of medical examinar autopsy protocols.

"Persuant to an order of a court a body may be exhumed - removed from its burial place....(but) an autopsy of exhumed remains presents certain problems to the autopsy surgeon. In the first place, the body is generally embalmed, and the chemicals used in embalming are apt to destroy evidence of the crime. If considerable time has elapsed from death to exhumaton and the natural disintegration of the body has taken place, it is obvious that the disinterred body is not a good subject for an autopsy."

6) Development of a profile with critical offender characteristics.

"Motive is that which stems from within the individual, rather than from without. It is that which incites an individual to certain actions. Motive is the 'why' of the act, the reason for it. Intent is the result of a motive, and is the bridge between the motive and the act. Without intent no action would be taken. When plans are made to do some act then an intent to do that act has been made as the result of some motivation. The intent of the murder is to kill...Motive or its absence may be of considerable importance in determining the intent of the defendant. Murderous intent may be inferred from motive clearly established, while absence of motive is more than pertinent to the question of intent where it is an issue."

7) Investigative suggestions predicated on the above.

"The investigation into the circumstances of a murder will reveal the situation which confronted the individual guilty of the killing, and a knowledge of the characteristics of each suspect will give the investigator some knowldge of how each of them would react to such a situation...It all depends on the individual and the situation with which he is confronted."

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Are we looking for a serial killer here?

A primary factor of personal integrity is a sincere desire to arrive at a conclusion based upon facts. The investigator must be free of bias or prejudic, and cannot let these emotions interfere with his objective efforts to arrive at the facts..."

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Are we looking for a serial killer here?

A primary factor of personal integrity is a sincere desire to arrive at a conclusion based upon facts. The investigator must be free of bias or prejudic, and cannot let these emotions interfere with his objective efforts to arrive at the facts..."

It is my supposition that those responsible for the murder of JFK had killed before and have killed since.

The methodology of investigation holds true even if not a serial killer.

And because of the JFK Act which gives us the police and investigative reports, we have all that is necessary to proceed.

BK

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Betcha most of us agree that at least one of the triggermen was a professional.

I suspect the Frenchman who was deported a day or a week after the assassination. Do you folks or was his presence in Dallas coincidental or was he perhaps an alternative patsy?

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Betcha most of us agree that at least one of the triggermen was a professional.

I suspect the Frenchman who was deported a day or a week after the assassination. Do you folks or was his presence in Dallas coincidental or was he perhaps an alternative patsy?

Tim,

You are speculating here about the Frenchman, and adding unnecessary input before we even begin the investigation.

This thread is going to follow the standard police procedures for investigating homicides, and if you want to follow along you have to observe the rules -

"A primary factor of personal integrity is a sincere desire to arrive at a conclusion based upon facts. The investigator must be free of bias or prejudice, and cannot allow these emotions to interfere withhis objective efforts to arrive at the facts...."

Now there will be a point in the investigation to consider the police reports of foreigners being in the vacinity of a crime scene, but please wait unitl we finish the preliminary requirements for a proper investigation before inserting any more speculative information.

Thanks,

BK

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It is my hypothesis that with the primary evidence and police and investigative reports now in the public domain, thanks to the JFK Act, it is possible to follow the standard investigative practices on our own - and develop the available evidence as a prerequsite to a grand jury hearing.

All district attorneys and prosecutors depend on the police, detectives, investigators, researchers and medical examiners to develop the evidence they present in court. In the case of a major crime that crosses state jurisdictions, a Task Force is formed that includes representatives from all agencies and departments that are necessary to compete the investigation.

Those members of a homicide Task Force approach the crime from different directions, but with the same purpose - to develop evidence that can used in court to convict those responsible for the crime(s).

"In any kind of conspiracy case, this is a critical issue. What you want to do is flip one guy to be a government witness, then watch the whole house of cards come tumbling down. The choice of whom to approach first is important because if you pick the wrong guy and can't flip him, he's going to tip off everyone else and you're back to square one…The way to get to someone like this is to go through the smaller fish, just as with organized crime. As we go through all of the records, maybe one candidate will stand out from the rest for our purposes. He isn't a higher-up, but a clerk who fixes all the paperwork..."

From: "Mindhunter – Inside the FBI's Elite Serial Crime Unit" by John Douglas and Mark Olshaker (Pocket Books, 1995):

"In the case of every horrible crime since the beginning of civilization, there is always that searing but fundamental question: what type of person could have done such a thing?"

"The type of profiling and crime-scene analysis we do at the FBI's Investigative Support Unit attempts to answer that question. Behavior reflects personality. …Everything we see at a crime scene tells us something about the unknown subject or UNSUB, in police jargon, who committed the crime. By studying as many crimes as we could, and through talking to the experts – the perpetrators themselves – we have learned to interpret those clues in much the same way a doctor evaluates various symptoms to diagnose a particular disease or condition. And just as a doctor can begin forming a diagnosis after recognizing several aspects of a disease….he or she has seen before, we can make various conclusions when we see patterns start to emerge."

"Behavior reflects personality. One of the reasons our work is even necessary has to do with the changing nature of violent crime itself. We all know about the drug-related murders that plague most of our cities and the gun crimes that have become an everyday occurrence as well as a national disgrace. Yet it used to be that most crime, particularly the most violent crime, happened between people who in some way knew each other. We're not seeing that much any longer. As recently as the 1960s, the solution rate to homicide in this country was well over 90 percent. We're not seeing that any longer either. Now, despite impressive advances in science and technology, despite the advent of the computer age, despite many more police officers with far better and more sophisticated training and resources, the murder rate has been going up and the solution rate has been going down. More and more crimes are being committed by and against 'strangers, ' and in many cases we have no motive to work with, at least no obvious or logical motive."

"Traditionally most murders and violent crimes were relatively easy for law enforcement officials to comprehend. They resulted from critically exaggerated manifestations of feelings we all experience: anger, greed, jealously, profit, revenge. Once this emotional problem was taken care of, the crime or crime spree would end. Someone would be dead, but that was that and the police generally knew who and what they were looking for."

"But a new type of violent criminal has surfaced in recent years – the serial offender, who often doesn't stop until he is caught or killed, who learns by experience and who tends to get better and better at what he does, constantly perfecting his scenario from one crime to the next. I say 'surfaced' because, to some degree, he was probably with us all along, going back long before 1880s London and Jack the Ripper, generally considered the first modern serial killer. And I say 'he' because,…virtually all real serial killers are male."

"…Serial killers…also tend to be the most bewildering, personally disturbing, and most difficult to catch of all violent criminals. This is, in part, because they tend to be motivated by far more complex factors that the basic ones I've just enumerated. This, in turn, makes their patterns more confusing and distances them from such other normal feelings as compassion, guilt or remorse."

"Sometimes the only way to catch them is to learn how to think like they do….I will be relating….how we developed the behavioral approach to criminal-personality profiling, crime analysis, and prosecutorial strategy,…No mater how much the criminal thinks he knows, the more he does try to evade detection or throw us off the track, the more behavioral clues he's going to give us to work with."

"Local police catch criminals….what we do is assist local police in focusing their investigations, then suggest some proactive techniques that might help draw a criminal out. Once they catch him….we try to formulate a strategy to help the prosecutor bring out the defendant's true personality during the trial. 'If you want to understand the artist, you have to look at the painting.' To know the offender you have to look at the crime."

Edgar Allen Poe, in "The Murders in the Rue Morgue" wrote: "Deprived of ordinary resources, the analyst throws himself into the spirit of his opponent, identifies himself therewith, and not infrequently sees thus, at a glance, the sole methods by which he may seduce into error or hurry into miscalculation."

"When we teach the elements of criminal-personality profiling and crime-scene analysis to FBI agents or law enforcement professionals attending the National Academy, we try to get them to think of the entire story of the crime. What took place? This includes everything that might be behaviorally significant about the crime. Why did it happen the way it did?…Who would have committed this crime for these reasons? That is the task we set for ourselves."

"Everybody has a rock….Whether it's embezzlement, public corruption, a mob investigation, a fencing scheme, or a corrupt union you have to penetrate, it doesn't matter; the principles are going to be the same. What I would advise in any of these types of cases would be to target the whomever you deem to be the 'weakest link,' figure out a way to bring him in and let him see what he's up against, then win his cooperation in going after the others."

"In any kind of conspiracy case, this is a critical issue. What you want to do is flip one guy to be a government witness, then watch the whole house of cards come tumbling down. The choice of whom to approach first is important because if you pick the wrong guy and can't flip him, he's going to tip off everyone else and you're back to square one…The way to get to someone like this is to go through the smaller fish, just as with organized crime. As we go through all of the records, maybe one candidate will stand out from the rest for our purposes. He isn't a higher-up, but a clerk who fixes all the paperwork…Next come the choice of who is 'cast' to lead the interrogation. My preference is usually for someone a little older and more authoritative than the subject, a sharp dresser with a commanding appearance, someone who can be friendly and outgoing and make the subject relax, but become absolutely serious and directed as soon as the circumstances call for it…"

"'Staging' can be just as effective in dealing with…any large ongoing investigation. I suggest concentrating all of your materials into one place,…for example, if you take over a conference room for your 'task force,' gather all your agents, staff and files together, you'll be showing your subject just how serious you are. If you can 'decorate' the walls with, say, blowups of surveillance photos and other signs of just how wide-ranging and official this ongoing investigation is, the point will be driven home all the more forcefully. A couple of video monitors playing tapes of your targets in the act are icing on the cake. Among my personal favorite touches are wall charts showing the penalties each person would face if convicted."

"The basis for any successful deal is gong to be the truth and an appeal to your subject's reason and common sense. All the staging does is call attention to the key elements…And my experience tells met that there is a way to get everyone, if you can only figure out what it is."

xxxxyyyyzzz

Edited by William Kelly
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CRIME SCENES - PLACES OF INTEREST (Where witnesses, evidence, records & documents were produced and can be obtained).

1) JFK LIMO - SS-100-X

2) DEALEY PLAZA -

3) TEXAS SCHOOL BOOK DEPOSITORY -

a) Front Door

:) Basement

c) First Floor

d) Second Floor

e) Fifth Floor

f) Sixth Floor

g) Elevators

h) Stairs

i) Back Door

4) OAK CLIFF -

a) Rooming House

B) 10th & Patton

c) Tippit's Car

d) Gas Station where jacket recovered.

e) Library

f) Church

g) Top 10 Records

h) Shoe Story

i) Texas Theater

j) Dobbs House coffee shop

k) Mexican Restaurant

l) Used Car Lot

m) Gas Station II

n) Backyard photos Apartment

o) Ruby's Apartment

p) Other, x,y,z.

5) Parkland Hospital - Illegal removal of body, destruction of evidence.

6) Love Field - Phone conversations before takeoff.

7) AF1 - See: Radio Logs

8) Andrews AFB - See: Logs

9) White House - WHCA - Situation Room in Basement.

10) LBJ Home

11) Bathesda Naval Hospital

12) Mrs. Paine's Home/Garage

13) Mrs. Paine's stationwagon

14) Michael Paine's car

15) Magazine St. Apartment/ New Orleans

16) Camp Street

17) New Orleans Trade Mart

18) Pierre Marquette Office Building - 17th Floor

19) Chicago Apartment of Jean Asse (West)

20) Campisi's Egyptian Lounge

21) Dallas YMCA

22) Dallas Police Dept.

23) Dallas Sheriff's Office

24) Walker's House

25) Hotel Commercio, Mexico City

26) JM/WAVE Miami -

a-safehouses

b-boats-

c-planes-

27) Cuba - G2 - Where captured commando prisoners taken.

28) Other

Edited by William Kelly
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Bill, sorry to be "picky" but most of these places, while perhaps of importance to the investigation, do not meet the technical definition of a "crime scene."

By the way, you left out DGI HQ in Havana.

And JMWAVE.

And what is the "technical defination" of a "crime scene."

Thanks, Tim.

BK

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I believe I stand corrected, BK.

From Wikipedia:

A crime scene is a location where an illegal act took place, and comprises the area from which most of the physical evidence is retrieved by trained law enforcement personnel, CSIs or in rare circumstances forensic scientists. A crime scene is a location wherein evidence of a crime may be located. It is not necessarily the location the crime took place. Indeed, there are primary, secondary and often tertiary crime scenes. For instance, the police may use a warrant to search an offender's home. Even though the offender did not commit the crime at that location evidence of the crime may be found there. In another instance, an offender might kidnap at one location (primary crime scene), transport the victim (the car is a second crime scene), commit another crime at a distant location (murder, for instance) and then drop the body at a fourth scene.

Soldiers of the United States Army Criminal Investigation Division inspecting a crime scene.All locations wherein there is the potential for the recovery of evidence must be handled in the same manner. Legal concepts impacting the usefulness of evidence in court (Daubert, chain of custody, etc), apply to the recovery of evidence whether or not a crime actually occurred at that location.

Note however the flat-out discrepancy between the first and second sentences. Logic would suggest that a crime scene is where the actual crime was committed not where evidence of the crime might be found. Of course I have no objection if you want to use a more expansive definition.

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I believe I stand corrected, BK.

From Wikipedia:

A crime scene is a location where an illegal act took place, and comprises the area from which most of the physical evidence is retrieved by trained law enforcement personnel, CSIs or in rare circumstances forensic scientists. A crime scene is a location wherein evidence of a crime may be located. It is not necessarily the location the crime took place. Indeed, there are primary, secondary and often tertiary crime scenes. For instance, the police may use a warrant to search an offender's home. Even though the offender did not commit the crime at that location evidence of the crime may be found there. In another instance, an offender might kidnap at one location (primary crime scene), transport the victim (the car is a second crime scene), commit another crime at a distant location (murder, for instance) and then drop the body at a fourth scene.

Soldiers of the United States Army Criminal Investigation Division inspecting a crime scene.All locations wherein there is the potential for the recovery of evidence must be handled in the same manner. Legal concepts impacting the usefulness of evidence in court (Daubert, chain of custody, etc), apply to the recovery of evidence whether or not a crime actually occurred at that location.

Note however the flat-out discrepancy between the first and second sentences. Logic would suggest that a crime scene is where the actual crime was committed not where evidence of the crime might be found. Of course I have no objection if you want to use a more expansive definition.

I have motified the list - retitled it : Crime scenes - Places of Interest (where witnesses, evidence, records and documents were produced or could be obtained) and added JMWAVE and Cuba G2.

If anyone has any additional crime scenes or places of interest that fit into this category please let me know and I will add them to the list.

Soon, I would like to approach each crime scene/place of interest as a police crime scene investigator should and identify any potential witness and evidence that can be used in court, specifically a grand jury - today.

Thanks for your interest in this,

BK

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