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Medical Error at Parkland Hospital


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Whereas the topic related to the chest incisions had become so scattered in discussion, perhaps there are those who have interest in those simple facts which have only recently been revealed.

That being that there was considerable "medical error" in the initial emergency treatment of JFK.

First off, I would recommend that anyone who has interest in the subject matter, actually take the time and effort to review the autopsy notes and autopsy report of Dr. Humes.

Secondly, I would recommend that a complete review of ALL testimonies of the Parkland Medical Staff who treated JFK be undertaken.

Then, one is not that likely to become lost by what ANYONE states or claims on this forum, and one can judge exactly who has and who has not done their reading assignment.

Thirdly, prior to believing anything, as stated by anyone, on the subject matter, I would personally find me a good ER/Trauma Doctor, (actually any good ER/Trauma RN could tell you the same thing), and run this information "up the flagpole" with them.

In that regards, one is by far less likely to end up with "foot & mouth" diesease on this public forum.

So:

1. JFK was entered into the ER/Emergency Room.

2. For whatever reason (either failure to utilize the laryngoscope or failure to insert the scope deep enough)*

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Laryngoscope

The tear in the right side of the trachea at appromimately the third tracheal ring, was not observed.

3. The entubation tube (endotracheal tube) was inserted into the throat and the "balloon/cuff" was inflated.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Endotracheal_tube

4. However, the balloon/cuff of the tube was actually inflated ABOVE the tear in the trachea of JFK.

5. Thereafter, when positive pressure respriatory means was adminstered to to JFK via the endotracheal tube, this positive pressure oxygen was allowed to escape the pulmonary system through the tear in the trachea, and thus enter the thoracic cavity as well as the surrounding tissues of the neck.

6. This action created a mediastinal emhysema condition within the thoracic cavity of JFK.

7. In addition, the failure to obtain positive pressure with ventilation equipment, gave rise to the immediate suspicion of a possible pneumothorax in JFK.

http://www.emedicine.com/EMERG/topic470.htm

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Whereas the topic related to the chest incisions had become so scattered in discussion, perhaps there are those who have interest in those simple facts which have only recently been revealed.

That being that there was considerable "medical error" in the initial emergency treatment of JFK.

First off, I would recommend that anyone who has interest in the subject matter, actually take the time and effort to review the autopsy notes and autopsy report of Dr. Humes.

Secondly, I would recommend that a complete review of ALL testimonies of the Parkland Medical Staff who treated JFK be undertaken.

Then, one is not that likely to become lost by what ANYONE states or claims on this forum, and one can judge exactly who has and who has not done their reading assignment.

Thirdly, prior to believing anything, as stated by anyone, on the subject matter, I would personally find me a good ER/Trauma Doctor, (actually any good ER/Trauma RN could tell you the same thing), and run this information "up the flagpole" with them.

In that regards, one is by far less likely to end up with "foot & mouth" diesease on this public forum.

So:

1. JFK was entered into the ER/Emergency Room.

2. For whatever reason (either failure to utilize the laryngoscope or failure to insert the scope deep enough)*

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Laryngoscope

The tear in the right side of the trachea at appromimately the third tracheal ring, was not observed.

3. The entubation tube (endotracheal tube) was inserted into the throat and the "balloon/cuff" was inflated.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Endotracheal_tube

4. However, the balloon/cuff of the tube was actually inflated ABOVE the tear in the trachea of JFK.

5. Thereafter, when positive pressure respriatory means was adminstered to to JFK via the endotracheal tube, this positive pressure oxygen was allowed to escape the pulmonary system through the tear in the trachea, and thus enter the thoracic cavity as well as the surrounding tissues of the neck.

6. This action created a mediastinal emhysema condition within the thoracic cavity of JFK.

7. In addition, the failure to obtain positive pressure with ventilation equipment, gave rise to the immediate suspicion of a possible pneumothorax in JFK.

http://www.emedicine.com/EMERG/topic470.htm

Well!

One would think that after some 40+ years, it would be difficult to come up with any "new" information relative to the medical treatment of JFK.

Obviously not!----Provided of course that one actually reviews the factual evidence.

Which by the way will demonstrate that the words "subcutaneous emphysema" is clearly written two separate times (handwritten autopsy notes as well as final autopsy report), as well as multiple other references to "emphysema".

1. In all probability, the Parkland Dr. who introduced the endotracheal tube into the throat of JFK did not initially utilize the laryngoscope.

This is in fact quite common when there is no visible reason to suspect damage to the airway tract.

2. Had the endotracheal tube been fully and properly inserted into the trachea of JFK, with the balloon/cuff inflated BELOW the tear in the trachea, then positive ventilation/respiratory function would have been immediately achieved, and there would have been absolutely no need for the tracheostomoty.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tracheotomy

Uses of tracheotomy

The conditions in which a tracheotomy may be used are:

In emergency settings, in the context of failed endotracheal intubation or where intubation is contraindicated,

Dr. CARRICO - I believe we were to where the endotracheal tube had been inserted. After this, the President--his respirations were assisted by the Bennett machine. We again listened to .his chest to attempt to evaluate the respirations. Breath sounds were diminished, especially on the right, despite the fact that the endotracheal tube was in place and the cuff inflated, there continued to be some leakage around the tracheal wound.

For this reason Dr. Perry elected to perform a tracheotomy,

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If one fully follows the sequential history of the events in the Parkland ER, they will find that the endotracheal entubation had failed due to the escape of oxygen out the tear in the trachea of JFK, PRIOR to any point at which the tracheostomy began.

Thusly, JFK had a tear to the right/lateral side of his trachea PRIOR to Dr. Perry having even begun the cut to enter the anterior throat of JFK.

And, since there was absolutely no injury to the right lateral side of the neck of JFK, then this tear in the trachea was a result of some missile or object having passed in a horizontal plane, laterally to the trachea, and in so doing, created the tear.*

(excluding the possibility that the ER Dr. created the tear in the trachea upon insertion of the endotracheal tube, which is most unlikely considering that the tear was elongated horizontally.)

Which brings us around to another of those wildly speculative theories such as:

There Was No Bullet Wound in John F. Kennedy's Throat

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When in reality, if one accurately follows the medical treatment history of the ER treatment which JFK received at Parkland Hospital, they will find:

1. Endotracheal entubation was initiated.

2. This positive pressure respiratory measure failed due to a leak (puncture) within the pulmonary system of JFK.

3. The "leak" was found to constitute a tear to the right lateral side of the tracheaa at approximately the third tracheal ring, with the trachea being somewhat deviated to the left.

4. Positive pressure respiratory attempts had caused a leakage of oxygen from the pulmonary system of JFK, out the tear of the trachea, into the mediastinum, prior to Dr. Perry having ever begun the tracheostomy.

5. Without benefit of being able to see any visible wound to the chest, etc; as well as the time consuming procedure of getting X-rays, the standard accepted treatment is to assume that an individual who can not be successfully entubated, and which a leakage of respiratory effort is obvious, is a tracheostomy.

5. The accepted "standard" for remedying a failed entubation attempt, is a tracheostomy.

6. The accepted "standard" for a potentially deflated lung* is the insertion of chest (drainage) tubes within the pleural space.

http://www.medterms.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=4947

Pleural space: The tiny area between the two layers of the pleura (the thin covering that protects and cushions the lungs). The pleural space is normally filled with a small amount of fluid.

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