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The Parkland Cuban:


Greg Parker
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Inspector Kelley of the Secret Service interviewed Father Walter McChann on April 30, 1964. Fr McChann had been chaplain of the Dallas Cuban Catholic Committee since 1961, and the following year, had been given the responsibility of running the resettlement office. The main focus of this work was in assisting the exiles in finding jobs, and in providing relief in the interim. McChann was interviewed as this work brought him into regular contact with Sylvia Odio. A report on the interview was sent to the Warren Commission on May 5, 1964, and was entered into the records as Commission Exhibit 2943.

The part of the report of interest here goes as follows: He [McChann] first made contact with Heitman [Dallas FBI] when it came to his attention that one of these Cuban refugees was extorting money from some other Cubans, was making false promises to the Cubans, was a disruptive influence in the Cuban community and was considered by Father McChann to be a "political Cuban" rather than a Cuban who was interested in receiving assistance from the Committee. He could not recall the name of this Cuban but he believes the Cuban is still employed at Parkland Hospital.

Mrs Connell was interviewed by the FBI on Nov 29, 1963. This report is contained in Commission Exhibit 3108. Connell had been a volunteer with the Cuban Catholic Committee, and had befriended Sylvia Odio as a result. Although she did not mention the Parkland Cuban, she did pass on the information that General Edwin Walker and Colonel [Robert] Castorr had been "trying to arouse the feelings of Cuban refugees in Dallas against the Kennedy administration policies."

Harold Weisberg picked up on these leads in the 1960s. He had been rightly appalled that McChann, Connell and Castorr were all passed over as witnesses by the Warren Commission, and that seemingly no effort had been expended in finding out who the Parkland Cuban was.[1] In finally interviewing the wife of Colonel Castorr, Weisberg fell short of finding out his identity, but was told that this Cuban was sent back to Miami after the assassination.[2]

The Warren Commission, the FBI and the Secret Service were not alone however, in ignoring information about this Cuban. The Dallas Police also ignored information regarding him, despite that information being provided by the wife of one of their own.

Buried in the Dallas assassination archives is the original of a memo from OA Jones to Chief Stevenson and Captain Fritz. The date is listed as "unknown". A copy of this however, is also in the archives, and it gives the date as Nov 22, 1963.[3]

The text of the Memo is reproduced here:

To: Chief Stevenson

Captain Fritz

Subject: Information on threats against President Kennedy

The wife of Detective RE Abbott said that a former employee at Parkland Hospital was heard by Mrs Johnson on the admission desk and a orderly named HOSEY saying that President Kennedy would be killed. The former employee was a Cuban.

His name can be furnished by Mr Morgan, who is Mrs Abbott's supervisor.

OA Jones

Captain of Police

It is a pity Weisberg did not know of this memo at the time he was writing Whitewash. It seems to have gone largely unnoticed or ignored ever since.

ENDNOTES

[1] Weisberg notes in his document appendix to Oswald in New Orleans that: "Had these leads been followed, had the Commission had the interest in them it was charged with having, it would have led to other vital information, including threats against the president's life.

[2] Whitewash by Harold Weisberg, "The Number of Shots." Weisberg also speculated that the Parkland Cuban may have been the person who planted the so called "magic bullet" on the hospital stretcher.

[3] Original is Item 11 in Box 1 Folder 14 of the Dallas Police assassination archives. The copy is Item 10 in Box 7 Folder 7.

Really interesting Greg.

Appreciate the end notes too.

Esp noteworthy, to me, is the naming of prime suspect (among many prime suspects) Walker.

Also the possibility that the anonymous Cuban planted the magic bullet, which would, if true, make me wonder what Ruby was doing at Parkland in that case. I'd always assumed he was doing the planting. Perhaps he was just insuring that the President was dead. And reporting that info back to his superiors of course ("Hello, Mr Hunt...).

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Inspector Kelley of the Secret Service interviewed Father Walter McChann on April 30, 1964. Fr McChann had been chaplain of the Dallas Cuban Catholic Committee since 1961, and the following year, had been given the responsibility of running the resettlement office. The main focus of this work was in assisting the exiles in finding jobs, and in providing relief in the interim. McChann was interviewed as this work brought him into regular contact with Sylvia Odio. A report on the interview was sent to the Warren Commission on May 5, 1964, and was entered into the records as Commission Exhibit 2943.

The part of the report of interest here goes as follows: He [McChann] first made contact with Heitman [Dallas FBI] when it came to his attention that one of these Cuban refugees was extorting money from some other Cubans, was making false promises to the Cubans, was a disruptive influence in the Cuban community and was considered by Father McChann to be a "political Cuban" rather than a Cuban who was interested in receiving assistance from the Committee. He could not recall the name of this Cuban but he believes the Cuban is still employed at Parkland Hospital.

Mrs Connell was interviewed by the FBI on Nov 29, 1963. This report is contained in Commission Exhibit 3108. Connell had been a volunteer with the Cuban Catholic Committee, and had befriended Sylvia Odio as a result. Although she did not mention the Parkland Cuban, she did pass on the information that General Edwin Walker and Colonel [Robert] Castorr had been "trying to arouse the feelings of Cuban refugees in Dallas against the Kennedy administration policies."

Harold Weisberg picked up on these leads in the 1960s. He had been rightly appalled that McChann, Connell and Castorr were all passed over as witnesses by the Warren Commission, and that seemingly no effort had been expended in finding out who the Parkland Cuban was.[1] In finally interviewing the wife of Colonel Castorr, Weisberg fell short of finding out his identity, but was told that this Cuban was sent back to Miami after the assassination.[2]

The Warren Commission, the FBI and the Secret Service were not alone however, in ignoring information about this Cuban. The Dallas Police also ignored information regarding him, despite that information being provided by the wife of one of their own.

Buried in the Dallas assassination archives is the original of a memo from OA Jones to Chief Stevenson and Captain Fritz. The date is listed as "unknown". A copy of this however, is also in the archives, and it gives the date as Nov 22, 1963.[3]

The text of the Memo is reproduced here:

To: Chief Stevenson

Captain Fritz

Subject: Information on threats against President Kennedy

The wife of Detective RE Abbott said that a former employee at Parkland Hospital was heard by Mrs Johnson on the admission desk and a orderly named HOSEY saying that President Kennedy would be killed. The former employee was a Cuban.

His name can be furnished by Mr Morgan, who is Mrs Abbott's supervisor.

OA Jones

Captain of Police

It is a pity Weisberg did not know of this memo at the time he was writing Whitewash. It seems to have gone largely unnoticed or ignored ever since.

ENDNOTES

[1] Weisberg notes in his document appendix to Oswald in New Orleans that: "Had these leads been followed, had the Commission had the interest in them it was charged with having, it would have led to other vital information, including threats against the president's life.

[2] Whitewash by Harold Weisberg, "The Number of Shots." Weisberg also speculated that the Parkland Cuban may have been the person who planted the so called "magic bullet" on the hospital stretcher.

[3] Original is Item 11 in Box 1 Folder 14 of the Dallas Police assassination archives. The copy is Item 10 in Box 7 Folder 7.

Really interesting Greg.

Appreciate the end notes too.

Esp noteworthy, to me, is the naming of prime suspect (among many prime suspects) Walker.

Also the possibility that the anonymous Cuban planted the magic bullet, which would, if true, make me wonder what Ruby was doing at Parkland in that case. I'd always assumed he was doing the planting. Perhaps he was just insuring that the President was dead. And reporting that info back to his superiors of course ("Hello, Mr Hunt...).

Thanks Myra,

Walker and his pals and supporters deserve a place on any suspect list, imo, though I do think the masterminds are higher up the food chain.

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Greg,

Regarding the Parkland orderly named Hosey, do you know if that is Hosey McCoy?

James

James, I'm no closer to finding out. Godinez, may be a viable "suspect", but I'd really like to get a hold of a list of employees from somewhere.

Never heard of Hosey McCoy. Sounds like a sidekick in an old Western! I had assumed Hosey was a surname (and indeed, there are currently people with that surname living in Dallas), but now you mention it, Mrs Abbott may only have known him by a first name.

Can you provide any further info about him?

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When Kantor saw Ruby at Parkland, Kantor and some other reporters had just followed Kilduff into a side entrance of the hospital. Kantor was about to go with them up some stairs, when he felt someone tug his arm. Kantor turned around and saw Ruby. Had Ruby simply followed them in?

Would Ruby have had access to the area where the bullet was planted, i.e. discovered on a stretcher by an orderly?

While Ruby was cozy with the DPD, that presumably wouldn't cut much ice with the Secret Service at Parkland.

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Greg,

Regarding the Parkland orderly named Hosey, do you know if that is Hosey McCoy?

James

James, I'm no closer to finding out. Godinez, may be a viable "suspect", but I'd really like to get a hold of a list of employees from somewhere.

Never heard of Hosey McCoy. Sounds like a sidekick in an old Western! I had assumed Hosey was a surname (and indeed, there are currently people with that surname living in Dallas), but now you mention it, Mrs Abbott may only have known him by a first name.

Can you provide any further info about him?

Greg,

I don't have a lot on him but his full name was Hosey Lee McCoy. He left Parkland not long after the assassination and got a job at the Medical Arts Hospital. In 1964, he was injured when a fuse box shorted out. From what I have been able to gather, firemen who attended the scene thought the incident was somewhat strange.

Anyway, I agree that Godinez is definitely a viable 'suspect'.

James

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Inspector Kelley of the Secret Service interviewed Father Walter McChann on April 30, 1964. Fr McChann had been chaplain of the Dallas Cuban Catholic Committee since 1961, and the following year, had been given the responsibility of running the resettlement office. The main focus of this work was in assisting the exiles in finding jobs, and in providing relief in the interim. McChann was interviewed as this work brought him into regular contact with Sylvia Odio. A report on the interview was sent to the Warren Commission on May 5, 1964, and was entered into the records as Commission Exhibit 2943.

The part of the report of interest here goes as follows: He [McChann] first made contact with Heitman [Dallas FBI] when it came to his attention that one of these Cuban refugees was extorting money from some other Cubans, was making false promises to the Cubans, was a disruptive influence in the Cuban community and was considered by Father McChann to be a "political Cuban" rather than a Cuban who was interested in receiving assistance from the Committee. He could not recall the name of this Cuban but he believes the Cuban is still employed at Parkland Hospital.

Mrs Connell was interviewed by the FBI on Nov 29, 1963. This report is contained in Commission Exhibit 3108. Connell had been a volunteer with the Cuban Catholic Committee, and had befriended Sylvia Odio as a result. Although she did not mention the Parkland Cuban, she did pass on the information that General Edwin Walker and Colonel [Robert] Castorr had been "trying to arouse the feelings of Cuban refugees in Dallas against the Kennedy administration policies."

Harold Weisberg picked up on these leads in the 1960s. He had been rightly appalled that McChann, Connell and Castorr were all passed over as witnesses by the Warren Commission, and that seemingly no effort had been expended in finding out who the Parkland Cuban was.[1] In finally interviewing the wife of Colonel Castorr, Weisberg fell short of finding out his identity, but was told that this Cuban was sent back to Miami after the assassination.[2]

The Warren Commission, the FBI and the Secret Service were not alone however, in ignoring information about this Cuban. The Dallas Police also ignored information regarding him, despite that information being provided by the wife of one of their own.

Buried in the Dallas assassination archives is the original of a memo from OA Jones to Chief Stevenson and Captain Fritz. The date is listed as "unknown". A copy of this however, is also in the archives, and it gives the date as Nov 22, 1963.[3]

The text of the Memo is reproduced here:

To: Chief Stevenson

Captain Fritz

Subject: Information on threats against President Kennedy

The wife of Detective RE Abbott said that a former employee at Parkland Hospital was heard by Mrs Johnson on the admission desk and a orderly named HOSEY saying that President Kennedy would be killed. The former employee was a Cuban.

His name can be furnished by Mr Morgan, who is Mrs Abbott's supervisor.

OA Jones

Captain of Police

It is a pity Weisberg did not know of this memo at the time he was writing Whitewash. It seems to have gone largely unnoticed or ignored ever since.

ENDNOTES

[1] Weisberg notes in his document appendix to Oswald in New Orleans that: "Had these leads been followed, had the Commission had the interest in them it was charged with having, it would have led to other vital information, including threats against the president's life.

[2] Whitewash by Harold Weisberg, "The Number of Shots." Weisberg also speculated that the Parkland Cuban may have been the person who planted the so called "magic bullet" on the hospital stretcher.

[3] Original is Item 11 in Box 1 Folder 14 of the Dallas Police assassination archives. The copy is Item 10 in Box 7 Folder 7.

Really interesting Greg.

Appreciate the end notes too.

Esp noteworthy, to me, is the naming of prime suspect (among many prime suspects) Walker.

Also the possibility that the anonymous Cuban planted the magic bullet, which would, if true, make me wonder what Ruby was doing at Parkland in that case. I'd always assumed he was doing the planting. Perhaps he was just insuring that the President was dead. And reporting that info back to his superiors of course ("Hello, Mr Hunt...).

Thanks Myra,

Walker and his pals and supporters deserve a place on any suspect list, imo, though I do think the masterminds are higher up the food chain.

Totally agreed Greg.

Walker was mid-level. Over the Cubans but under the corporate/CIA types.

His insanity and military training was useful to the leaders.

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Greg,

Regarding the Parkland orderly named Hosey, do you know if that is Hosey McCoy?

James

James, I'm no closer to finding out. Godinez, may be a viable "suspect", but I'd really like to get a hold of a list of employees from somewhere.

Never heard of Hosey McCoy. Sounds like a sidekick in an old Western! I had assumed Hosey was a surname (and indeed, there are currently people with that surname living in Dallas), but now you mention it, Mrs Abbott may only have known him by a first name.

Can you provide any further info about him?

Greg,

I don't have a lot on him but his full name was Hosey Lee McCoy. He left Parkland not long after the assassination and got a job at the Medical Arts Hospital. In 1964, he was injured when a fuse box shorted out. From what I have been able to gather, firemen who attended the scene thought the incident was somewhat strange.

Anyway, I agree that Godinez is definitely a viable 'suspect'.

James

James, you may well have found the real McCoy. I'm going to try and track him down.

As for Godinez, I think the niggling doubt I have about him being the right guy is that he was identified as a "former employee" with no mention of being a doctor. Maybe over anylizing. But even if it's not him, he surely would know who it was. There is a Dr Rodolfo Godinez working in a children's hospital in Philadelphia, but the name may not be all that uncommon, and I haven't been able to locate any background details on him to rule him in or out.

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Considering the way the "investigators" in the JFK case hid potential evidence behind [intentional?] misspellings of names, could "Hosey" have possibly been a Jose' instead? Unless we know for sure, I don't think I'd rule it out. Remember the Randles/Randalls? That wasn't even the most blatant case.

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Greg,

I think Godinez lives in Miami.

That aside, he was quite prominent during 1962/63 in recruiting Cubans for action against Castro. He was also quite vocal in his criticisms of the Kennedy administration.

I tried to track Godinez down some time back but didn't get very far. There is a fellow Brigade 2506 member named Montero Diaz who liased with Godinez from Miami in the Dallas recruitment drive and he would definitely be worth speaking to.

I suspect Diaz's connections amongst the various exile anti-Castro organizations may have been employed to get peripheral Dallas participants to Miami safe-houses.

FWIW.

James

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Considering the way the "investigators" in the JFK case hid potential evidence behind [intentional?] misspellings of names, could "Hosey" have possibly been a Jose' instead? Unless we know for sure, I don't think I'd rule it out. Remember the Randles/Randalls? That wasn't even the most blatant case.

It never clicked with me that misspellings were strategic Mark.

Good observation.

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Greg,

I think Godinez lives in Miami.

That aside, he was quite prominent during 1962/63 in recruiting Cubans for action against Castro. He was also quite vocal in his criticisms of the Kennedy administration.

I tried to track Godinez down some time back but didn't get very far. There is a fellow Brigade 2506 member named Montero Diaz who liased with Godinez from Miami in the Dallas recruitment drive and he would definitely be worth speaking to.

James, any chance that his surname is actually Montero-Diaz?

I suspect Diaz's connections amongst the various exile anti-Castro organizations may have been employed to get peripheral Dallas participants to Miami safe-houses.

As you may recall, I have some interest in the issue of safe-houses, and the cost of setting one up.

FWIW.

James

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Peter, Myra & Mark

The issue of misspelled names is a huge one. But it's not always insurmountable. One example: the names of the witness I found appears once in the 26 volumes. In trying to track this person down, it became obvious that no-one has such a surname. On a hunch, I added a particular letter and immediately found him. Others have also been found despite their names not appearing anywhere in the records with the right spelling.

Assuming a misspelling can also be a trap. One example: There was an FBI report issued after the assassination detailing a report sent to USIA by a "Bernard Weisman" accusing Chinese Communists. I immediately thought that it had to be Bernard Weissman of Black Border ad fame - especially since his name is incorrectly spelled with one "s" in some documents. It took a few years, but I finally found a government record which showed that the USIA did in fact employ a "Bernard Weisman". Two different spellings, and now I knew it was also two different people.

The Hosey/Jose argument had merit... but only up until James confirmed there really was an employee named Hosey (McCoy). Just to confuse things further... the White Pages lists no "Hosey McCoy"... but there is a listing for a Hosery McCoy in Alabama. Is this another misspelling... or just a case of cruel parents :huh:

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Greg,

I think Godinez lives in Miami.

That aside, he was quite prominent during 1962/63 in recruiting Cubans for action against Castro. He was also quite vocal in his criticisms of the Kennedy administration.

I tried to track Godinez down some time back but didn't get very far. There is a fellow Brigade 2506 member named Montero Diaz who liased with Godinez from Miami in the Dallas recruitment drive and he would definitely be worth speaking to.

James, any chance that his surname is actually Montero-Diaz?

I suspect Diaz's connections amongst the various exile anti-Castro organizations may have been employed to get peripheral Dallas participants to Miami safe-houses.

As you may recall, I have some interest in the issue of safe-houses, and the cost of setting one up.

FWIW.

James

Greg,

Regarding Montero Diaz, that is the only name I was given. He has connections to some unfriendlies associated with the whole CIA/Cuban thing which has made me wary about any approach.

James

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