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The Nash Rambler


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This is the Nash Rambler Jay Harrison had in storage for over ten years. I took these pictures on 3-30-02 before we (Jay and I ) moved it to my daughter's and her husbands farm near Lockhart. I have other pictures as well as Dawn.

There are Mexico permits still pasted on this car as well as other info.

Photos taken by William R (Tosh) Plumlee on 3-30-2002 at Austin Texas

Edited by William Plumlee
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This is the Nash Rambler Jay Harrison had in storage for over ten years. I took these pictures on 3-30-02 before we (Jay and I ) moved it to my daughter's and her husbands farm near Lockhart. I have other pictures as well as Dawn.

There are Mexico permits still pasted on this car as well as other info.

This is the car after we cut it loose from the tree at the storage place. Thats Jay Harrison with his back to the camara. He did not like to have his picture taken.

post-1680-1204146306_thumb.jpg

Edited by William Plumlee
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This is the Nash Rambler Jay Harrison had in storage for over ten years. I took these pictures on 3-30-02 before we (Jay and I ) moved it to my daughter's and her husbands farm near Lockhart. I have other pictures as well as Dawn.

There are Mexico permits still pasted on this car as well as other info.

This is the car after we cut it loose from the tree at the storage place. Thats Jay Harrison with his back to the camara. He did not like to have his picture taken.

For the record this is the car that Richard Bartholomew wrote about finding at UT. (It's been referenced here on the forum a few times (See "Possible Discovery of an Automobile Used in the JFK Conspiracy", can be found online).

Tosh thanks for the pic with Jay in it! No he wasn't much on having his pic taken but I have a bunch of them, different places, times, gatherings...

Dawn

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For those wondering just how unique this '59 Rambler Cross-Country 6-cylinder station wagon is, I suppose it depends upon whether it's in Super, DeLuxe, or Custom trim. It may be one of over 66,000...or one of 38,000...or one of much fewer, depending upon the trim level. [i just can't read the trim designation, which is on the rear door, inside the "spear" trim.] My dad and grand-dad sold Hudsons, and then Ramblers, thru 1959...so this model is sort of familiar to me.

For more info on the 1959 Ramblers, including production numbers, see this link:

http://www.amcyclopedia.org/node/58

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This is the Nash Rambler Jay Harrison had in storage for over ten years. I took these pictures on 3-30-02 before we (Jay and I ) moved it to my daughter's and her husbands farm near Lockhart. I have other pictures as well as Dawn.

There are Mexico permits still pasted on this car as well as other info.

This is the car after we cut it loose from the tree at the storage place. Thats Jay Harrison with his back to the camara. He did not like to have his picture taken.

For the record this is the car that Richard Bartholomew wrote about finding at UT. (It's been referenced here on the forum a few times (See "Possible Discovery of an Automobile Used in the JFK Conspiracy", can be found online).

Tosh thanks for the pic with Jay in it! No he wasn't much on having his pic taken but I have a bunch of them, different places, times, gatherings...

Dawn

Thought I'd add the manuscript: (I hope the link still works, I am re-posting it from the post made by Duke Lane in 06.

Dawn

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Duke Lane

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Find Member's Posts Feb 28 2006, 07:11 PM Post #16

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QUOTE(Robert Howard @ Jan 16 2006, 03:25 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>

I am posting this article because I believe it ties together the connections of the conspiracy better than any single article written concerning the 'connecting the dots' aspect of JFK's assassination.

Possible Discovery of an Automobile Used

In the JFK Conspiracy

Copyright © 1993 by Richard Bartholomew

I found a link to the whole article starting here.

--------------------

Duke Lane

Once in a while, you can get shown the light

In the strangest of places if you look at it right!

Bio - http://educationforum.ipbhost.com/index.php?showtopic=5278

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I have found Barthoolomew to be one of the least boring writers going. I only hope he is still going; he is also a cartoonist as someone posted about nearly a month ago.

This article about the Nash Rambler, at first struck me as highly conjectural, but then got down into some absolutely great stuff about the Magnolia Group (?) in Dallas that was made up of White Russians, and oily geologists. Also great overview of Paine background in all directions, and some fascinating stuff about a divergent strain of quakers, that frankly could explain a lot!

I couldn't put it down.

I also strongly recommend his article on the rifle and clip problem about the conflicting accounts of the kind of rifle that was "found" on the sixth floor. It starts out highly technical and then moves in unpredictable and fascinating political directions. This Bartholomew really knows his WWII spy history and uses it well to inform JFK research.

http://www.assassinationresearch.com/v1n2/gtds.html

Edited by Nathaniel Heidenheimer
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Looks like it "might" say "Cross Country" in the back & "might" say "Custom" on the side.

*Don`t hold me to this.

_____________________________________

Michael,

Definitely. Good catch.

FWIW,

--Thomas

PS- The first photo looks like the "ramble in the bramble" (not to be confused with the "rumble in the jungle").

Sorry 'bout that. Couldn't resist the temptation....

_____________________________________

Edited by Thomas Graves
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Far f'n Out! And where is it now? I hope secure. I hope people in control of it also realize it would now be possible to test DNA of hair and even dandruff, etc. to match to persons who were in that car!....protect that lill baby and don't do anything like vacuum inside!....don't even think of it. Keep it closed and away from the 'Borg'.

Plumlee photo 3-30-02

Inside view of Rambler:

post-1680-1204166481_thumb.jpg

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Far f'n Out! And where is it now? I hope secure. I hope people in control of it also realize it would now be possible to test DNA of hair and even dandruff, etc. to match to persons who were in that car!....protect that lill baby and don't do anything like vacuum inside!....don't even think of it. Keep it closed and away from the 'Borg'.

Plumlee photo 3-30-02

Inside view of Rambler:

Before Rambler was moved. Jay Harrison

photo taken by Tosh Plumlee 03-30-02

post-1680-1204167140_thumb.jpg

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Moved to my laptop, and with the LCD display the image is clearer. That DEFINITELY is a "Custom," which makes it one of 38,761 produced. And from Tosh's pic of the interior, I can also state without fear of contradiction that the car is equipped with the push-button automatic transmission...since there is no column shifter of any kind. [The push buttons were located in the lower left corner of the dash area.]

VIN numbers, as we know them today, didn't exist in that era. But the serial number of that car, if it's still there, will be on a stamped plate spot-welded to the top of the right-hand spring tower, and is only visible with the hood raised. If Texas DMV records are available--and from '63, the odds are that they were never put onto any computer database, and are still on paper somewhere [but they also may have been microfilmed, if they were saved at all]--it should be easy to determine whether this was Mrs. Paine's Rambler station wagon.

Big IF.

BUT...if Mrs. Paine's Rambler station wagon had an automatic transmission, you may be on the right track. Likewise, if Mrs. Payne's Rambler had a "three on the tree," you might be following a dead end here. So does anyone know for sure the serial # of the Payne Rambler, or even whether it was a stick or an automatic? I don't believe I've ever heard the answers to these two questions.

Edited by Mark Knight
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Moved to my laptop, and with the LCD display the image is clearer. That DEFINITELY is a "Custom," which makes it one of 38,761 produced. And from Tosh's pic of the interior, I can also state without fear of contradiction that the car is equipped with the push-button automatic transmission...since there is no column shifter of any kind. [The push buttons were located in the lower left corner of the dash area.]

VIN numbers, as we know them today, didn't exist in that era. But the serial number of that car, if it's still there, will be on a stamped plate spot-welded to the top of the right-hand spring tower, and is only visible with the hood raised. If Texas DMV records are available--and from '63, the odds are that they were never put onto any computer database, and are still on paper somewhere [but they also may have been microfilmed, if they were saved at all]--it should be easy to determine whether this was Mrs. Paine's Rambler station wagon.

Big IF.

BUT...if Mrs. Paine's Rambler station wagon had an automatic transmission, you may be on the right track. Likewise, if Mrs. Payne's Rambler had a "three on the tree," you might be following a dead end here. So does anyone know for sure the serial # of the Payne Rambler, or even whether it was a stick or an automatic? I don't believe I've ever heard the answers to these two questions.

This is the same car that Richard Bartholomew wrote about here, according to the license plate, and car's history is well documented in that article. This is a quick excerpt from the article...

"George Gordon Wing, the owner of the car from April 1963 until his death in December 1991, was a Ph.D. and associate professor in the Spanish and Portuguese Department."

As far as I know, Ruth Paine didn't own a Rambler station wagon. Sometimes her '55 or '56 Chevy wagon was confused with the Rambler whenever a "station wagon" is mentioned. The Paines owned the Chevy wagon, a mid-fifties Oldsmobile, and a Citroen. The only thing that ties Ruth Paine to having a Rambler wagon is when Oswald was asked about getting into a "Rambler station wagon", and he said something about not getting her involved. My thinking is that he keyed in on the word "station wagon" and assumed that they were talking about her and her car.

JWK

Edited by J. William King
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