Jump to content

Recommended Posts

Thomas H. Purvis Posted Today, 04:28 AM

Summary:

1. Tangential wound of the scalp.

2. Extremely elongated entry wound (15mm).

3. Tunnel through the soft tissue of the neck.

4. Skull entry at a higher point than the scalp entry.

OH! This is so difficult, is it not?

P.S. Did I forget to mention that the bullet also went through the slightly raised coat collar?

Failure to understand the evidence has no bearing on the validity of that evidence.

As a general rule, it merely means that one does not understand the evidence.

(Tom Purvis)

Tom, When was Kennedy's head in this type of position?

Antti;

This is merely a use of the HSCA photo (resembling JFK) to demonstrate the downward angle of penetration.

At the time/point of impact, JFK was leaned to his left towards Jackie, with his head bent forward/chin down towards chest, and face rolled slight to the right with the right side of his face facing slightly upwards.

Thusly, the right rear of his head where the bullet struck in the hairline , was in an almost horizontal position and directly exposed to the line-of-sight/line-of-flight of the bullet.

Because JFK's head/face was rolled somewhat to the right and chin down as he leaned leftwards, the bullet pathway was a downward, as well as a slightly right to left passage through the head.

If you wish a good perspective, then sit on the edge of the bed with feet on floor, bend head forward to chin about on chest, rotate head to look in direction of right shoulder, and then lean slightly forward and approximately 45+degrees to the left.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Replies 44
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Tom Purvis:

Antti;

This is merely a use of the HSCA photo (resembling JFK) to demonstrate the downward angle of penetration.

At the time/point of impact, JFK was leaned to his left towards Jackie, with his head bent forward/chin down towards chest, and face rolled slight to the right with the right side of his face facing slightly upwards.

Thusly, the right rear of his head where the bullet struck in the hairline , was in an almost horizontal position and directly exposed to the line-of-sight/line-of-flight of the bullet.

Because JFK's head/face was rolled somewhat to the right and chin down as he leaned leftwards, the bullet pathway was a downward, as well as a slightly right to left passage through the head.

If you wish a good perspective, then sit on the edge of the bed with feet on floor, bend head forward to chin about on chest, rotate head to look in direction of right shoulder, and then lean slightly forward and approximately 45+degrees to the left.

Tom,

Ok, thanks.

I understand what you are saying, but I just don't see this rather steep angle in the Zapruder film. I just can't see the neck in a virtually horizontal level with the street. The way I have tried this position and looked at Zapruder, I just keep seeing a discrepancy of some 20 degrees with what you say and with what is on film, as to me it looks like on the film that the head still semi-erect.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Tom Purvis:

Antti;

This is merely a use of the HSCA photo (resembling JFK) to demonstrate the downward angle of penetration.

At the time/point of impact, JFK was leaned to his left towards Jackie, with his head bent forward/chin down towards chest, and face rolled slight to the right with the right side of his face facing slightly upwards.

Thusly, the right rear of his head where the bullet struck in the hairline , was in an almost horizontal position and directly exposed to the line-of-sight/line-of-flight of the bullet.

Because JFK's head/face was rolled somewhat to the right and chin down as he leaned leftwards, the bullet pathway was a downward, as well as a slightly right to left passage through the head.

If you wish a good perspective, then sit on the edge of the bed with feet on floor, bend head forward to chin about on chest, rotate head to look in direction of right shoulder, and then lean slightly forward and approximately 45+degrees to the left.

Tom,

Ok, thanks.

I understand what you are saying, but I just don't see this rather steep angle in the Zapruder film. I just can't see the neck in a virtually horizontal level with the street. The way I have tried this position and looked at Zapruder, I just keep seeing a discrepancy of some 20 degrees with what you say and with what is on film, as to me it looks like on the film that the head still semi-erect.

And, in that regards, you are absolutely correct!

Having long ago begun the "trim & square" a lot of the photographic exhibits which I paid good money for in ordering from NARA, I ceased to do this.

The photo is merely rotated 90-degrees, which would indicate a downward angle of fire of some almost exactly 20-degrees,

The actual downward angle of fire (to the street elevation) as determined during the US Secret Service, to the Third/Last/Final/Altgens/Station 4+95 impact, was approximately 14-degrees downward.

With the correction fact for the actual elevation of JFK, this would have made the actual downward angle at impact of approximatel 12 degrees.

Since you have obviously been paying attention, and I have little use for these photo's after I cease to post and get on with something worthwhile, I have trimmed and oriented the photo to represent the approximatly 12-degree downward angle of fire.

Perhaps this will, with the previious information, demonsrate how the right rear of JFK's head was rolled to the right and coupled with the lean to the left, placed the backside of his head in a position which was only slightly above the horizontal position.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Antti;

Since you are quite obviously attempting to decide the merits of this impact, let me again add, as well as provide the following information.

The elongated 15mm length of the entry wound into the rear of the head of JFK is of prime importance in resolving the position of his head at the time of impact.

However, as anyone who studied would know, one must have the actual downward angle of flight of the bullet as well.

Which, due to possession of the survey which demonstrates this, only I was in full possession of.

The attached drawing demonstrates the principle of how the bullet (what angle of attack) would have had to struck the skull in order to have achieved this elongated penetration.

However, JFK's head could have been at an angle of approximately 3-degrees higher (above horizontal plane) as the 3-degrees downward slope of the street would have corrected this back.

Thusly, the back slope of JFK's head would have been at approximately 14-degrees upwards from the horizontal, and the drawing which demonstrates 14-degrees, has taken in that the car; JFK; and all occupants were on an inherent 3=degree downward slope.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Tom,

I have been able to go along with most of the ideas you have put forward. However, I am having problems with the second headshot. You suggest that the bullet entered the skin just above the hairline and penetrated the skull close to the EOP. There is certainly some evidence for this but I see that the trajectory would be almost vertical relative to the anatomical position. However, if you look at the Supplementary Report of the Autopsy of President Kennedy (ie the part where the brain is examined) you find the following statement: "There is a longitudinal laceration of the right hemisphere which is para-sagital in position approximately 2.5cm to the right of the midline which extends from the tip of the occipital lobe posteriorly to the tip of the frontal lobe anteriorly..." To me this suggests that a bullet travelled from the back of the head through the right cerebral hemisphere in a posterior-anterior direction with a largely horizontal trajectory going upwards only to a minor extent. This seems to be at odds with the trajectory that you suggest.

Is there any way of resolving this apparent contradiction?

Tony

Tony;

Were I in the business of giving such as the "Mary Ferrell Award", then you would most assuredly be at the top of the listing for the "Tom Purvis Attaboy" award.

(which of course would most probably only serve to get you laughed at a lot).

You have pretty well found the pathway of the true/one and only, "Magic Bullet"/aka that bullet which impacted down in front of James Altgens, penetrated through the head of JFK, and exited to strike JBC in the right shoulder as he lay across the open area of the jump seats with his back and right shoulder exposed to the projectile as it exited the frontal lobe of JFK's brain.

Which pathway, if one will fully read all of the examination of the brain, passed through the mid-brain region.

NOT, the upper areas of the parietal and frontal lobes which were ripped all to pieces by the fragmenting bullet strike at Z313.

Humes "assumed" that the damage to the mid-brain was created by some sort of fragment, and merely ignored that it was not a jagged ripping area similar to that damage across the upper areas of the parietal and frontal lobe.

Additionally, if one goes back and reads up on all works, they will find that the lateral skull X-ray was once marked with what was presumed to be an air/emphysema pathway directly through this area which was created by the projectile.

Lastly, although not "orginal source" information (since the original was actually burned), one may want to go back and read the next best thing, which is the handwritten autopsy notes of Dr. Humes.

There are many items here which ultimately did not end up in the "Final Report".

Beginning with the "tangential" strike to the scalp in the occipital region.

http://www.history-matters.com/archive/jfk...Vol17_0031b.htm

Tom,

Thanks for the information, I am beginning to get the idea now. When Dr. Humes describes the injury to the right cerebral hemisphere he is working towards the final conclusion that only one bullet passed through the head and killed Kennedy. He therefore uses descriptions that make it sound like one bullet is travelling from back to front causing all the damage that was found at autopsy. However, the damage was caused by a combination of two bullets passing through the head and in fact could only have been caused by two bullets going through the head.

A bullet entering the skin near the hairline and tunnelling through until it penetrated the skull just below the EOP would have a steep upward trajectory which could not cause the damage seen at the front of the brain. Dr. Humes gets around this by saying that it was a fragment travelling through the brain from back to front, as fragments can move off in a different direction relative to the original bullet trajectory. However, not even a fragment could not have caused the trail of small bullet fragments passing downward and forwards from the top of the head towards the right frontal bone just above the orbit.

Dr Humes looked at the xrays taken at the start of the autopsy, why could he not see that?

If I was struggling to understand that two bullets when through Kennedy's brain and not just one I am in good company. The HSCA Forensic Pathology Panel reviewed all the forensic evidence and concluded that Kennedy was only struck by one bullet. This time they said the single bullet was the one that entered the cowlick area of the scalp and passed downwards and forward to exit somewhere near the bregma. They did not explain how such a bullet could have caused damage to the occipital lobe of the brain.

I wondered if this esteemed panel of experts was right and in fact there was no entry wound near the EOP and, therefore, Tom got it all wrong. However, I looked at some of the details of the brain injury and came across a description of injury to the corpus callosum. Looking at the position of this structure I realised that any fragments of bone (or bullet) coming down on it from the cowlick area would hit it at a somewhat perpendicular angle and they would simply go straight through leaving holes on the surface. On the other hand any fragments of bone (or bullet) originating from the area of the EOP would hit the top of the corpus callosum at a very acute angle and could easily make long tears along the upper surface in a back to front direction.

Which type of injury is in fact described? the latter, a single tear running the full length of the upper surface of the corpus callosum. So it appears you are right, there was a bullet entering the brain near the EOP.

The only question is how did such a highly qualified panel of experts manage to get it so wrong?

Tony

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Tom,

I have been able to go along with most of the ideas you have put forward. However, I am having problems with the second headshot. You suggest that the bullet entered the skin just above the hairline and penetrated the skull close to the EOP. There is certainly some evidence for this but I see that the trajectory would be almost vertical relative to the anatomical position. However, if you look at the Supplementary Report of the Autopsy of President Kennedy (ie the part where the brain is examined) you find the following statement: "There is a longitudinal laceration of the right hemisphere which is para-sagital in position approximately 2.5cm to the right of the midline which extends from the tip of the occipital lobe posteriorly to the tip of the frontal lobe anteriorly..." To me this suggests that a bullet travelled from the back of the head through the right cerebral hemisphere in a posterior-anterior direction with a largely horizontal trajectory going upwards only to a minor extent. This seems to be at odds with the trajectory that you suggest.

Is there any way of resolving this apparent contradiction?

Tony

Tony;

Were I in the business of giving such as the "Mary Ferrell Award", then you would most assuredly be at the top of the listing for the "Tom Purvis Attaboy" award.

(which of course would most probably only serve to get you laughed at a lot).

You have pretty well found the pathway of the true/one and only, "Magic Bullet"/aka that bullet which impacted down in front of James Altgens, penetrated through the head of JFK, and exited to strike JBC in the right shoulder as he lay across the open area of the jump seats with his back and right shoulder exposed to the projectile as it exited the frontal lobe of JFK's brain.

Which pathway, if one will fully read all of the examination of the brain, passed through the mid-brain region.

NOT, the upper areas of the parietal and frontal lobes which were ripped all to pieces by the fragmenting bullet strike at Z313.

Humes "assumed" that the damage to the mid-brain was created by some sort of fragment, and merely ignored that it was not a jagged ripping area similar to that damage across the upper areas of the parietal and frontal lobe.

Additionally, if one goes back and reads up on all works, they will find that the lateral skull X-ray was once marked with what was presumed to be an air/emphysema pathway directly through this area which was created by the projectile.

Lastly, although not "orginal source" information (since the original was actually burned), one may want to go back and read the next best thing, which is the handwritten autopsy notes of Dr. Humes.

There are many items here which ultimately did not end up in the "Final Report".

Beginning with the "tangential" strike to the scalp in the occipital region.

http://www.history-matters.com/archive/jfk...Vol17_0031b.htm

Tom,

Thanks for the information, I am beginning to get the idea now. When Dr. Humes describes the injury to the right cerebral hemisphere he is working towards the final conclusion that only one bullet passed through the head and killed Kennedy. He therefore uses descriptions that make it sound like one bullet is travelling from back to front causing all the damage that was found at autopsy. However, the damage was caused by a combination of two bullets passing through the head and in fact could only have been caused by two bullets going through the head.

A bullet entering the skin near the hairline and tunnelling through until it penetrated the skull just below the EOP would have a steep upward trajectory which could not cause the damage seen at the front of the brain. Dr. Humes gets around this by saying that it was a fragment travelling through the brain from back to front, as fragments can move off in a different direction relative to the original bullet trajectory. However, not even a fragment could not have caused the trail of small bullet fragments passing downward and forwards from the top of the head towards the right frontal bone just above the orbit.

Dr Humes looked at the xrays taken at the start of the autopsy, why could he not see that?

If I was struggling to understand that two bullets when through Kennedy's brain and not just one I am in good company. The HSCA Forensic Pathology Panel reviewed all the forensic evidence and concluded that Kennedy was only struck by one bullet. This time they said the single bullet was the one that entered the cowlick area of the scalp and passed downwards and forward to exit somewhere near the bregma. They did not explain how such a bullet could have caused damage to the occipital lobe of the brain.

I wondered if this esteemed panel of experts was right and in fact there was no entry wound near the EOP and, therefore, Tom got it all wrong. However, I looked at some of the details of the brain injury and came across a description of injury to the corpus callosum. Looking at the position of this structure I realised that any fragments of bone (or bullet) coming down on it from the cowlick area would hit it at a somewhat perpendicular angle and they would simply go straight through leaving holes on the surface. On the other hand any fragments of bone (or bullet) originating from the area of the EOP would hit the top of the corpus callosum at a very acute angle and could easily make long tears along the upper surface in a back to front direction.

Which type of injury is in fact described? the latter, a single tear running the full length of the upper surface of the corpus callosum. So it appears you are right, there was a bullet entering the brain near the EOP.

The only question is how did such a highly qualified panel of experts manage to get it so wrong?

Tony

It would appear that my mission on earth is now accomplished and I can return to my home planet!

Because of exact lack of keeping records of what bone fragments came in at what time, etc;, it is now impossible to establish the exact sequence of events as to how the skull cap section of JFK's skull, which contained the Cowlick entry as well as beginning exit point, was replaced back onto JFK's head.

As demonstrated in Dr. Boswell's drawing, and in my discussions with him, all of that portion of the skull was not present when they did their initial examination.

And, the "INITIAL" exam is when they found the bullet entrance hole at the EOP, and even then, only approximately 1/2 of it was present until a small crescent shaped fragment of bone was also brought in, which completed the entire EOP entry/puncture wound.

After the initial examination, in which ONLY the EOP entry was found, Humes went into an office to write down his notes, and Dr. Boswell was busy with his drawings as well.

Thereafter, the body was taken in to be X-rayed, and at some point prior to X-ray, the skull cap section of skull was located and placed back into position prior to this X-ray.

Now, in that regards, Dr. Humes has testified about some X-rays that were developed and which they looked at in reference as to help locating bullet fragments, but he has also stated other X-rays were not developed.

Dr. Boswell has little knowledge of these matters as they were primarily the responsibility of the radiologists who worked with Dr. Humes on the matter.

Not being a radiologist, it is highly conceiveable that Dr. Humes actually saw the anterior posterior X-ray, and thought that the hole that he was looking at was the EOP entry.

This would be highly understandable.

Unfortunately, we will most likely now never know as Dr. Humes would not discuss the matter with me, and of course is now long deceased.

Between what was going on in the autopsy room, the fragments of skull showing up from various places with no written designations as to where they were found and where they actually belonged/fit into the skull, as well as exactly when they were replaced, was a major error in the overall aspects.

That there are in fact two bullet entry points into the skull of JFK is a relatively simple thing to resolve.

1. There is what appears to be the cowlick entry, which point is located in that portion of the skull cap section of JFK's head that was blown off and over onto the right hand side of his head.

2. There is what appears to be an entry through the scalp in the back of the head, in the exact region as the cowlick entry through the skull.

3. Neither the anterior/posterior X-ray, nor the autopsy photo which demonstrates the apparant scalp entry, can be established as "absolutel proof" that this is in fact an entry point, based merely on the X-ray and the autopsy photo of the back of the head.

4. There is an ABSOLUTE point of exit from within the skull shown on the anterior/posterior X-ray.

This point of exit is forward of the apparant cowlick entry hole in the skull, and is absolutely the point of initial exit of a bullet which was travelling from rearward, towards the front.

The beginning exit left the metallic residue embedded in the inner table of the skull as well as the bullet channel through both tables of the skull, and thereafter the bullet and/or fragments, tore/blew out a large portion of the frontal lobe of the skull as it/they continued forward.

5. The autopsy surgeons absolutely found a bullet entry in the EOP region of the skull.

However, due to the downward angle of fire of approximately 15-degrees down, coupled with the position of JFK's head at the time of the Z313 impact, it would have been physically impossible for any bullet fired on this downward angle, thereafter striking the skull in the EOP region, to have immediately turned upwards, tunneling through the soft tissues of the neck, and thereafter exited in the top of JFK's head at approximately the juncture of the parietal and frontal lobe of the skull.

Therefore, that bullet exit point, as seen by it's metallic residue outline embedded in the inner table of the skull, and which is seen in the anterior/posterior X-ray, can not physically be from that shot which struck JFK in the head in the EOP region of the skull.

Therefore, another shot struck JFK in the head.

And, the Cowlick entry is the only other feasible as well as observed indication of such another impact to the skull.

Now, the Cowlick entry to some, would be claimed to be a possible exit point for a bullet which passed from JFK's head in a forward to rear position.

This can not be, as upon exit, such a bullet would have blown out, at minimum, the "beveling" area of the outer table of the skull upon exit, and this portion of skull being torn out, along with the bullet, would have created a totally obvious exiting rip in the rear scalp of JFK.

6. After impact of the Z313 shot, that portion of JFK's skull (the skull cap section) which contains the HSCA (as well as Clark Panel determined) entry point* as well as the initial exiting point with embedded metallic residue, was blown over onto the right hand side of JFK's head, and for all practical purposes was "out of play" for any additional bullet impacts.

* It is actually quite simple to determine that the Cowlick entry is in no way associated with the EOP entry, as the EOP entry sent radiating fractures in a variety of directions, fracturing and fragmenting the skull at the point of entry, into multiple pieces.

The Cowlick entry, as seen in the anterior/posterior X-ray, has no such radiating fractures.

Yet, the lateral X-ray clearly demonstrates these radiating fractures coverging towards a central point in the vicinity of the EOP.

Additionally, in a complete copy of the lateral X-ray, one can see an extremely dark/black area right where this convergence would take place, and this is without any doubt the actual inshoot area for the EOP entry point.

7. The EOP impact damage did not occur until down in front of James Altgens position, at which point JFK was no longer in any position in which the Zapruder film could sufficiently capture any disruption to the rear/occipital area of the head.

8. Due to the impact of the third shot, the already damaged skull managed to send the radiating fractures from the point of impact, upward, until such running cracks incurred the "void" of where the skull cap section of the skull was missing.

And, with this fracturing and fragmenting of the skull, the internal pressure in the brain created by the bullet, managed to "open" up this occipital area with the "blowback" effect.

Thereafter the bullet penetrated through the brain pretty much as you have stated, and exited intact in the frontal lobe of the brain where the skull was already missing as a result of the Z313 impact.

Thereafter, this blew cerebral tissue forward all over Nellie, JBC, etc;

So! Am I to assume that the "mystery" of the occipital damage, as seen by the Parkland personnel, is now resolved?

P.S. From all indication, it appears that Jackie pulled the skull cap and hair back over the top of JFK's head enroute to Parkland, then it was wrapped in Clint Hill's coat before getting JFK out of the car and on a stretcher.

P.P.S. Don't believe that the HSCA was fully on the "up and up" there were a few "diversionary" tricks utilized there as well. Just that they were a little more refined and polished than Specter & Company's hijinks.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Tom,

I have been able to go along with most of the ideas you have put forward. However, I am having problems with the second headshot. You suggest that the bullet entered the skin just above the hairline and penetrated the skull close to the EOP. There is certainly some evidence for this but I see that the trajectory would be almost vertical relative to the anatomical position. However, if you look at the Supplementary Report of the Autopsy of President Kennedy (ie the part where the brain is examined) you find the following statement: "There is a longitudinal laceration of the right hemisphere which is para-sagital in position approximately 2.5cm to the right of the midline which extends from the tip of the occipital lobe posteriorly to the tip of the frontal lobe anteriorly..." To me this suggests that a bullet travelled from the back of the head through the right cerebral hemisphere in a posterior-anterior direction with a largely horizontal trajectory going upwards only to a minor extent. This seems to be at odds with the trajectory that you suggest.

Is there any way of resolving this apparent contradiction?

Tony

Tony;

Were I in the business of giving such as the "Mary Ferrell Award", then you would most assuredly be at the top of the listing for the "Tom Purvis Attaboy" award.

(which of course would most probably only serve to get you laughed at a lot).

You have pretty well found the pathway of the true/one and only, "Magic Bullet"/aka that bullet which impacted down in front of James Altgens, penetrated through the head of JFK, and exited to strike JBC in the right shoulder as he lay across the open area of the jump seats with his back and right shoulder exposed to the projectile as it exited the frontal lobe of JFK's brain.

Which pathway, if one will fully read all of the examination of the brain, passed through the mid-brain region.

NOT, the upper areas of the parietal and frontal lobes which were ripped all to pieces by the fragmenting bullet strike at Z313.

Humes "assumed" that the damage to the mid-brain was created by some sort of fragment, and merely ignored that it was not a jagged ripping area similar to that damage across the upper areas of the parietal and frontal lobe.

Additionally, if one goes back and reads up on all works, they will find that the lateral skull X-ray was once marked with what was presumed to be an air/emphysema pathway directly through this area which was created by the projectile.

Lastly, although not "orginal source" information (since the original was actually burned), one may want to go back and read the next best thing, which is the handwritten autopsy notes of Dr. Humes.

There are many items here which ultimately did not end up in the "Final Report".

Beginning with the "tangential" strike to the scalp in the occipital region.

http://www.history-matters.com/archive/jfk...Vol17_0031b.htm

Tom,

Thanks for the information, I am beginning to get the idea now. When Dr. Humes describes the injury to the right cerebral hemisphere he is working towards the final conclusion that only one bullet passed through the head and killed Kennedy. He therefore uses descriptions that make it sound like one bullet is travelling from back to front causing all the damage that was found at autopsy. However, the damage was caused by a combination of two bullets passing through the head and in fact could only have been caused by two bullets going through the head.

A bullet entering the skin near the hairline and tunnelling through until it penetrated the skull just below the EOP would have a steep upward trajectory which could not cause the damage seen at the front of the brain. Dr. Humes gets around this by saying that it was a fragment travelling through the brain from back to front, as fragments can move off in a different direction relative to the original bullet trajectory. However, not even a fragment could not have caused the trail of small bullet fragments passing downward and forwards from the top of the head towards the right frontal bone just above the orbit.

Dr Humes looked at the xrays taken at the start of the autopsy, why could he not see that?

If I was struggling to understand that two bullets when through Kennedy's brain and not just one I am in good company. The HSCA Forensic Pathology Panel reviewed all the forensic evidence and concluded that Kennedy was only struck by one bullet. This time they said the single bullet was the one that entered the cowlick area of the scalp and passed downwards and forward to exit somewhere near the bregma. They did not explain how such a bullet could have caused damage to the occipital lobe of the brain.

I wondered if this esteemed panel of experts was right and in fact there was no entry wound near the EOP and, therefore, Tom got it all wrong. However, I looked at some of the details of the brain injury and came across a description of injury to the corpus callosum. Looking at the position of this structure I realised that any fragments of bone (or bullet) coming down on it from the cowlick area would hit it at a somewhat perpendicular angle and they would simply go straight through leaving holes on the surface. On the other hand any fragments of bone (or bullet) originating from the area of the EOP would hit the top of the corpus callosum at a very acute angle and could easily make long tears along the upper surface in a back to front direction.

Which type of injury is in fact described? the latter, a single tear running the full length of the upper surface of the corpus callosum. So it appears you are right, there was a bullet entering the brain near the EOP.

The only question is how did such a highly qualified panel of experts manage to get it so wrong?

Tony

http://www.history-matters.com/archive/jfk...Vol16_0506a.htm

Tony;

I would assume that you have expended considerable time digesting this.

Especially that part which deals with the basilar aspect examination.

Tom

Link to comment
Share on other sites

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Occiput

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Occipital_bone

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Basilar_skull_fracture

Dr. Humes "second generation" handwritten notes of the autopsy.

Latereal X-ray of JFK head taken during autopsy.

"A"----portion of "skull cap" blown off by impact of shot#2/aka Z313 impact, and thereafter blown over onto right hand side of JFK's head.

"B"----Occipital area of the skull which was severely fractured and fragmented due to the third/last/Altgens location impact with the rear base of the skull in the vicinity of the EOP.

Severe fragmentation caused by a weakened skull in which the area above it ("A") was already gone, as well as a section of the temporal bone blown over onto the right hand side of JFK's head with the Z313 impact injury as well.

"b1 & b2"----fractures lines in the skull which radiated from the point of impact in the EOP region, and which Dr. Humes clearly described, and Dr. Boswell clearly drew on his autopsy drawing sheet.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Portion of HSCA testimony of Dr. Humes and Dr. Boswell which deals with the EOP entry as well as the fragmentation of the skull in that region.

Additionally, this discussion reveals that only 1/2 of the entry wound was present in the sections of bone which were still intact with the scalp.

Dr. Boswell's drawing of the head, demonstrates the radiating nature of the fractures and fragments at the occipital region, as created by the bullet entrance which they observed, as well as the "radiating' lines from the center of the impact point.

Additionally, of key concern, is that portion of Dr. Boswell's drawing down at the bottom of the sheet which shows a crescent/half-moon section of skull.

For those who may recall, I long ago posted a copy of one of those letters written to Dr. Boswell in which this specific piece of bone was mentioned, and in which a follow-up conversation about this drawing and the bone at the rear base of JFK's skull was done in conjunction with the letter.

The small crescent/half-moon drawing was of a skull fragment which, according to Dr. Boswell's memory, was not attached to the scalp, and either fell out as the scalp was reflected or was a seperate piece of bone which was presented during the course of the initial examination.

This piece of bone contains a smaller "half-circle" indication along it's left side, and Dr. Boswell relayed that this was the other 1/2 of the entry hole for the wound of the occipital region.

When the intact skull fragments (still attached to the scalp) were re-assembled in place, they contained 1/2 of the penetration through the skull, and the small bone fragment drawn down at the bottom contained the other 1/2 of the penetration.

When this fragment drawn down at the bottom of the page was re-inserted/re-assembled into the skull of JFK, the EOP entry wound was complete, to include the characteristic beveling of the skull on the inner table.

Additionally, the "straight line" which drawn goint into the small fragment drawing at the bottom was drawn by Dr. Boswell and was meant to represent the approximate angle of penetration (angle of attack) of the projectile as it struck the bone.

It is specifically noted that on Dr. Boswell's drawing, at the time of the initial examination, in which the cause of death was determined to be a penetrating gunshot wound to the rear/EOP region of the head/skull, that portion of the skull which represents item "A"/aka the skull cap/aka a large area of the parietal and frontal lobes of the skull were not present.

Thusly, the autopsy determined the cause of death as being this single bullet penetration through the skull, and since a complete and thorough examination of JFK's brain was not undertaken until several days later, there was in fact insufficient examination of the brain to determine exactly how many missles had actually passed through the brain.

Added to that, no cross-sectioning was done, (which seems quite strange) when one considers what was observed from the basilar view/examination, and a "hasty decision" on the part of the autopsy surgeons (Primarily Humes) has now opened the door to a myriad of rabbit holes which lead no where and which have been opened as a result of a complete lack of examination and understanding of the significance of various aspects of the forensic; ballistic; pathological; and physical evidence.

Which by the way, the WC was quite adept at taking advantage of in "feeding" us THE SHOT THAT MISSED"

KIDFOHS---------------aka/the mushroom snydrone.

Failure to understand the evidence has no bearing on the validity of that evidence.

As a general rule, it merely means that one does not understand the evidence.

(Tom Purvis)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

And now, provided one has kept up with the conversation, you know "The Rest of the Story" as to why someone thought that the discussion as regards the tunneling through the soft tissue at the base of JFK's neck, as created by the bullet, should not be placed in the "damn record".

Simply due to the fact that if a bullet struck at the edge of the hairiline and tunnelled "upwards" to strike the skull, then this most assuredly was not associated with the Cowlick Entry wound which the HSCA Medical Panel was certain existed.

And, thusly, if what the Autopsy Surgeons were stating was correct, then JFK had two completely different and distinctive wounds to the head.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Tom,

I have been able to go along with most of the ideas you have put forward. However, I am having problems with the second headshot. You suggest that the bullet entered the skin just above the hairline and penetrated the skull close to the EOP. There is certainly some evidence for this but I see that the trajectory would be almost vertical relative to the anatomical position. However, if you look at the Supplementary Report of the Autopsy of President Kennedy (ie the part where the brain is examined) you find the following statement: "There is a longitudinal laceration of the right hemisphere which is para-sagital in position approximately 2.5cm to the right of the midline which extends from the tip of the occipital lobe posteriorly to the tip of the frontal lobe anteriorly..." To me this suggests that a bullet travelled from the back of the head through the right cerebral hemisphere in a posterior-anterior direction with a largely horizontal trajectory going upwards only to a minor extent. This seems to be at odds with the trajectory that you suggest.

Is there any way of resolving this apparent contradiction?

Tony

Tony;

Were I in the business of giving such as the "Mary Ferrell Award", then you would most assuredly be at the top of the listing for the "Tom Purvis Attaboy" award.

(which of course would most probably only serve to get you laughed at a lot).

You have pretty well found the pathway of the true/one and only, "Magic Bullet"/aka that bullet which impacted down in front of James Altgens, penetrated through the head of JFK, and exited to strike JBC in the right shoulder as he lay across the open area of the jump seats with his back and right shoulder exposed to the projectile as it exited the frontal lobe of JFK's brain.

Which pathway, if one will fully read all of the examination of the brain, passed through the mid-brain region.

NOT, the upper areas of the parietal and frontal lobes which were ripped all to pieces by the fragmenting bullet strike at Z313.

Humes "assumed" that the damage to the mid-brain was created by some sort of fragment, and merely ignored that it was not a jagged ripping area similar to that damage across the upper areas of the parietal and frontal lobe.

Additionally, if one goes back and reads up on all works, they will find that the lateral skull X-ray was once marked with what was presumed to be an air/emphysema pathway directly through this area which was created by the projectile.

Lastly, although not "orginal source" information (since the original was actually burned), one may want to go back and read the next best thing, which is the handwritten autopsy notes of Dr. Humes.

There are many items here which ultimately did not end up in the "Final Report".

Beginning with the "tangential" strike to the scalp in the occipital region.

http://www.history-matters.com/archive/jfk...Vol17_0031b.htm

Tom,

Thanks for the information, I am beginning to get the idea now. When Dr. Humes describes the injury to the right cerebral hemisphere he is working towards the final conclusion that only one bullet passed through the head and killed Kennedy. He therefore uses descriptions that make it sound like one bullet is travelling from back to front causing all the damage that was found at autopsy. However, the damage was caused by a combination of two bullets passing through the head and in fact could only have been caused by two bullets going through the head.

A bullet entering the skin near the hairline and tunnelling through until it penetrated the skull just below the EOP would have a steep upward trajectory which could not cause the damage seen at the front of the brain. Dr. Humes gets around this by saying that it was a fragment travelling through the brain from back to front, as fragments can move off in a different direction relative to the original bullet trajectory. However, not even a fragment could not have caused the trail of small bullet fragments passing downward and forwards from the top of the head towards the right frontal bone just above the orbit.

Dr Humes looked at the xrays taken at the start of the autopsy, why could he not see that?

If I was struggling to understand that two bullets when through Kennedy's brain and not just one I am in good company. The HSCA Forensic Pathology Panel reviewed all the forensic evidence and concluded that Kennedy was only struck by one bullet. This time they said the single bullet was the one that entered the cowlick area of the scalp and passed downwards and forward to exit somewhere near the bregma. They did not explain how such a bullet could have caused damage to the occipital lobe of the brain.

I wondered if this esteemed panel of experts was right and in fact there was no entry wound near the EOP and, therefore, Tom got it all wrong. However, I looked at some of the details of the brain injury and came across a description of injury to the corpus callosum. Looking at the position of this structure I realised that any fragments of bone (or bullet) coming down on it from the cowlick area would hit it at a somewhat perpendicular angle and they would simply go straight through leaving holes on the surface. On the other hand any fragments of bone (or bullet) originating from the area of the EOP would hit the top of the corpus callosum at a very acute angle and could easily make long tears along the upper surface in a back to front direction.

Which type of injury is in fact described? the latter, a single tear running the full length of the upper surface of the corpus callosum. So it appears you are right, there was a bullet entering the brain near the EOP.

The only question is how did such a highly qualified panel of experts manage to get it so wrong?

Tony

http://www.history-matters.com/archive/jfk...Vol16_0506a.htm

Tony;

I would assume that you have expended considerable time digesting this.

Especially that part which deals with the basilar aspect examination.

Tom

Tom;

Yes, I know you are referring to the bullet passing through the mid brain from the EOP entrance which was the second shot to the head.

The panel for the HSCA came out with some odd statements when they looked at photographs of the brain such as "The view of the majority of the panel was that the absence of injury to the inferior surface of the brain offers 'incontrovertible evidence' that the wound in the Presidents head is not the location described in the autopsy report" (ie the entry is not by the EOP) and later:"The inferior posterior portion of the cerebellum does not demonstate the degree of laceration, fragmentation or contusion that would be expected in this location if the bullet wound of enterance was as described in the autopsy report."

I thought that neither of these statements were correct and I have tried to figure out why the panel made them. I think that the panel assumed that there was only one head shot, which occurred at Zapruder frame 313 when the President's head position meant that a shot hitting the skull near the EOP would have a downward trajectory (they also assumed it had come from the 6th floor of the SBD) but in fact the shot hit the skull at a later time when the President had gone forward and the bullet was moving with an upward trajectory (relative to the anatomical position). Basically, I think they came up with false conclusions because they made false assumptions.

Tony

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Tom,

I have been able to go along with most of the ideas you have put forward. However, I am having problems with the second headshot. You suggest that the bullet entered the skin just above the hairline and penetrated the skull close to the EOP. There is certainly some evidence for this but I see that the trajectory would be almost vertical relative to the anatomical position. However, if you look at the Supplementary Report of the Autopsy of President Kennedy (ie the part where the brain is examined) you find the following statement: "There is a longitudinal laceration of the right hemisphere which is para-sagital in position approximately 2.5cm to the right of the midline which extends from the tip of the occipital lobe posteriorly to the tip of the frontal lobe anteriorly..." To me this suggests that a bullet travelled from the back of the head through the right cerebral hemisphere in a posterior-anterior direction with a largely horizontal trajectory going upwards only to a minor extent. This seems to be at odds with the trajectory that you suggest.

Is there any way of resolving this apparent contradiction?

Tony

Tony;

Were I in the business of giving such as the "Mary Ferrell Award", then you would most assuredly be at the top of the listing for the "Tom Purvis Attaboy" award.

(which of course would most probably only serve to get you laughed at a lot).

You have pretty well found the pathway of the true/one and only, "Magic Bullet"/aka that bullet which impacted down in front of James Altgens, penetrated through the head of JFK, and exited to strike JBC in the right shoulder as he lay across the open area of the jump seats with his back and right shoulder exposed to the projectile as it exited the frontal lobe of JFK's brain.

Which pathway, if one will fully read all of the examination of the brain, passed through the mid-brain region.

NOT, the upper areas of the parietal and frontal lobes which were ripped all to pieces by the fragmenting bullet strike at Z313.

Humes "assumed" that the damage to the mid-brain was created by some sort of fragment, and merely ignored that it was not a jagged ripping area similar to that damage across the upper areas of the parietal and frontal lobe.

Additionally, if one goes back and reads up on all works, they will find that the lateral skull X-ray was once marked with what was presumed to be an air/emphysema pathway directly through this area which was created by the projectile.

Lastly, although not "orginal source" information (since the original was actually burned), one may want to go back and read the next best thing, which is the handwritten autopsy notes of Dr. Humes.

There are many items here which ultimately did not end up in the "Final Report".

Beginning with the "tangential" strike to the scalp in the occipital region.

http://www.history-matters.com/archive/jfk...Vol17_0031b.htm

Tom,

Thanks for the information, I am beginning to get the idea now. When Dr. Humes describes the injury to the right cerebral hemisphere he is working towards the final conclusion that only one bullet passed through the head and killed Kennedy. He therefore uses descriptions that make it sound like one bullet is travelling from back to front causing all the damage that was found at autopsy. However, the damage was caused by a combination of two bullets passing through the head and in fact could only have been caused by two bullets going through the head.

A bullet entering the skin near the hairline and tunnelling through until it penetrated the skull just below the EOP would have a steep upward trajectory which could not cause the damage seen at the front of the brain. Dr. Humes gets around this by saying that it was a fragment travelling through the brain from back to front, as fragments can move off in a different direction relative to the original bullet trajectory. However, not even a fragment could not have caused the trail of small bullet fragments passing downward and forwards from the top of the head towards the right frontal bone just above the orbit.

Dr Humes looked at the xrays taken at the start of the autopsy, why could he not see that?

If I was struggling to understand that two bullets when through Kennedy's brain and not just one I am in good company. The HSCA Forensic Pathology Panel reviewed all the forensic evidence and concluded that Kennedy was only struck by one bullet. This time they said the single bullet was the one that entered the cowlick area of the scalp and passed downwards and forward to exit somewhere near the bregma. They did not explain how such a bullet could have caused damage to the occipital lobe of the brain.

I wondered if this esteemed panel of experts was right and in fact there was no entry wound near the EOP and, therefore, Tom got it all wrong. However, I looked at some of the details of the brain injury and came across a description of injury to the corpus callosum. Looking at the position of this structure I realised that any fragments of bone (or bullet) coming down on it from the cowlick area would hit it at a somewhat perpendicular angle and they would simply go straight through leaving holes on the surface. On the other hand any fragments of bone (or bullet) originating from the area of the EOP would hit the top of the corpus callosum at a very acute angle and could easily make long tears along the upper surface in a back to front direction.

Which type of injury is in fact described? the latter, a single tear running the full length of the upper surface of the corpus callosum. So it appears you are right, there was a bullet entering the brain near the EOP.

The only question is how did such a highly qualified panel of experts manage to get it so wrong?

Tony

http://www.history-matters.com/archive/jfk...Vol16_0506a.htm

Tony;

I would assume that you have expended considerable time digesting this.

Especially that part which deals with the basilar aspect examination.

Tom

Tom;

Yes, I know you are referring to the bullet passing through the mid brain from the EOP entrance which was the second shot to the head.

The panel for the HSCA came out with some odd statements when they looked at photographs of the brain such as "The view of the majority of the panel was that the absence of injury to the inferior surface of the brain offers 'incontrovertible evidence' that the wound in the Presidents head is not the location described in the autopsy report" (ie the entry is not by the EOP) and later:"The inferior posterior portion of the cerebellum does not demonstate the degree of laceration, fragmentation or contusion that would be expected in this location if the bullet wound of enterance was as described in the autopsy report."

I thought that neither of these statements were correct and I have tried to figure out why the panel made them. I think that the panel assumed that there was only one head shot, which occurred at Zapruder frame 313 when the President's head position meant that a shot hitting the skull near the EOP would have a downward trajectory (they also assumed it had come from the 6th floor of the SBD) but in fact the shot hit the skull at a later time when the President had gone forward and the bullet was moving with an upward trajectory (relative to the anatomical position). Basically, I think they came up with false conclusions because they made false assumptions.

Tony

To a large degree they had evidence, as well as testimony/statements which Dr. Humes & Dr. Boswell made, which they could not reconcile with their known understanding of the evidence.

That being the misconception that Z313 was the last shot, as well as the only shot to JFK's head.

And, I am of the opinion that Humes at least, had the same dilemma.

Three separate surgeons (Humes; Boswell; Finck), no matter how incompetent, are not going to mislocate a wound by some 4+ inches on the head, just as they are not going to confuse a wound of the occiput with a wound of the cowlick area.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Please sign in to comment

You will be able to leave a comment after signing in



Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...