Jump to content
The Education Forum

CIA 101


Recommended Posts

Pamela, No Name Key is about thirty miles north of Key West whereas the Everglades are on the mainland over 150 miles to the North.

If Files was ever really at No Name Key, how could he say No Name Key was in the Everglades?

If he was at No Name Key, which of the Interpen men did he meet? Hemming never saw him!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Pamela, No Name Key is about thirty miles north of Key West whereas the Everglades are on the mainland over 150 miles to the North.

If Files was ever really at No Name Key, how could he say No Name Key was in the Everglades?

If he was at No Name Key, which of the Interpen men did he meet? Hemming never saw him!

But, what they are talking about here is the shipment to Libya in 1977 when we had all of the C-4 on the North American Continent and that includes Canada and Mexico We had it locked up in a bunker in the desert. It was put in to five gallon buckets, filled two inches from the top, a plastic disc was then sealed into the can, then two inches of “Oil Drilling mud was put in, the can sealed and labeled Oil Drilling mud and that is what went on the “Bill of Landing” when it was trucked in a semi to the airport in Houston, Texas.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bentonite

Sodium bentonite expands when wet, possibly absorbing several times its dry mass in water. Because of its excellent colloidal properties (see Odom ref below) it is often used in drilling mud for oil and gas wells and for geotechnical and environmental investigations.

[edit] Uses for both types

Much of bentonite's usefulness in the drilling and geotechnical engineering industry comes from its unique rheological properties. Relatively small quantities of bentonite suspended in water form a viscous, shear thinning material.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Bentonite/aka drilling mud is sold completely dry in either sacks of approximately 50 lbs which can be easily handled (opened and mixed on the work sight with the "mud pump" and mud tanks), or in some instances in larger volumes (also dry) which can be handled with a small forklift.

Were one to handle and ship drilling mud "pre-mixed" in 5-gallon cans, the associative cost of shipping literally thousands of gallons of mixed mud per drilling rig would have gasoline prices at about $50.00 per gallon and the cost of natural gas so far beyond reason that we would all be cooking and heating with firewood and/or coal.

In my entire experience in the oilfield industry, NEVER have I observed bentonite/aka drilling mud shipped to a rig in five gallon cans.

Guess that one can learn new and marvelous new things here on this sight.

when we had all of the C-4 on the North American Continent and that includes Canada and Mexico We had it locked up in a bunker in the desert.

Nope! At the time, I had my own personal cache of approximately 8 pounds left over, as my ex can easily attest to.

One never knows exactly when a little "bang" may be needed.

P.S. I am also aware of a considerable number of others who also had their own private stockpile, in case of emergency.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Please sign in to comment

You will be able to leave a comment after signing in



Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...