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Sylvia Duran and Lee Harvey Oswald


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One of the most interesting aspects of Jeff Morley’s book, “Our Man in Mexico”, is his account of Sylvia Duran, a Mexican employee in the Cuban consulate in Mexico City.

At 11.00 a.m. on Friday, 27th September, 1963, Oswald told Duran that he wished to travel to the Soviet Union via Cuba. Duran told him that he would need a passport photograph to apply for a visa for Cuba. He returned an hour later with the photograph. Duran then told him he would need to visit the Soviet embassy to get the necessary paperwork. This he did but Vice Consul Oleg Nechiperenko informed him that the visa application would be sent to the Soviet embassy in Washington and would take about four months. Oswald then returned to the Cuban consulate at 4.00 and lied to Duran about his meeting with Nechiperenko. Duran checked Oswald’s story on the phone and after a brief argument he left the consulate. Six times Oswald needed to pass the newly installed LIERODE camera.

The CIA surveillance program worked and on Monday, 30th September, Anne Goodpasture recorded details of Oswald’s visits to the Cuban consulate. As Goodpasture noted, the two types of “security” information that most interested the CIA station concerned “U.S. citizens initiating or maintaining contact with the Cuban and Soviet diplomatic installations” and “travel to Cuba by U.S. citizens or residents.” (page 182)

The CIA tape of the Oswald call was marked “urgent” and was delivered to the station within 15 minutes of it taking place. Win Scott read Goodpasture’s report and next to the transcript of Duran’s call to the Soviet embassy, he wrote: “Is it possible to identify”.

It later emerged that the CIA station in Mexico was already monitoring Sylvia Duran. According to David Phillips and Win Scott, the CIA surveillance program had revealed that Duran was having an affair with Carlos Lechuga, the former Cuban ambassador in Mexico City, who was in 1963 serving as Castro’s ambassador to the United Nations. We also now know that Lechuga was involved in the secret negotiations with Lisa Howard on behalf of JFK.

Soon after the assassination of JFK Win Scott contacted Luis Echeverria and asked his men to arrest Sylvia Duran. He also told Diaz Ordaz that Duran was to be held incommunicado until she gave all details of her contacts with Oswald. Scott then reported his actions to CIA headquarters. Soon afterwards, John Whitten, the CIA head of the Mexican desk, called Scott with orders from Tom Karamessines that Duran was not to be arrested. Win told them it was too late and that the Mexican government would keep the whole thing secret. Karamessines replied with a telegram that began: “Arrest of Sylvia Duran is extremely serious matter which could prejudice U.S. freedom of action on entire question of Cuban responsibility.”

What did Karamessines mean by this? Why did he not want the Mexicans to find out? What we do know is that John Whitten was also surprised by Karamessines’ order and initially opposed sending the message to Scott.

Duran, her husband and five other people were arrested. Duran was “interrogated forcefully” (Duran was badly bruised during the interview). Echeverria reported to Scott that Duran had been “completely cooperative” and had made a detailed statement. This statement matched the story of the surveillance transcripts, with one exception. The tapes indicated that Duran made another call to the Soviet embassy on Saturday, 28th September. Duran then put an American on the line who spoke incomprehensible Russian. This suggests that the man could not have been Oswald who spoke the language well.

Duran was released but was then rearrested and questioned about her relationship with Oswald. Despite being roughed up she denied having a sexual relationship with Oswald. Echeverria believed her and she was released. However, Duran later admitted to a close friend that she had dated Oswald while he was in Mexico City.

A week after the assassination Elena Garro reported that she had seen Oswald at a party held by people from the Cuban consulate in September 1963. The following week, June Cobb, a CIA informant, confirmed Oswald presence at the party. She also had been told that Oswald was sleeping with Duran. Win Scott reported this information to CIA headquarters but never got a reply. (page 241)

Why did the CIA want Sylvia Duran kept out of this story? One released document reveals that a Mexican source on the CIA payroll suggested that it would be very easy to recruit Duran as a spy. (page 210) Did Karamessines via Phillips recruit Duran as a spy? If so, Win Scott and John Whitten were kept out of the loop. Why? Was there an unofficial CIA operation involving Duran and Oswald? To be more correct, someone posing as Oswald.

It later emerged that when Duran was interviewed by the Mexican authorities soon after the assassination she described the man who visited the Cuban consul's office as being "blond-haired" and with "blue or green eyes". Neither detail fits in with the authentic Oswald. But these details had been removed from the statement by the time it reached the Warren Commission.

Duran was interviewed by the House Select Committee on Assassinations in 1978. This testimony is classified. However, in 1979 Duran told the author, Anthony Summers that she told the HSCA that the man who visited the office was about her size (5 feet 3.5 inches). This created problems as Oswald was 5 feet 9.5 inches. When Summers showed Duran a film of Oswald taken at the time of his arrest, Duran said: "The man on the film is not like the man I saw here in Mexico City."

Win Scott died on 26th April, 1971, while he was negotiating with the CIA about publishing his memoirs that included an account of Oswald’s time in Mexico. Scott told Helms that he would not be talked out of publishing the book.

When Anne Goodpasture heard the news of Scott’s death she went straight to Jim Angleton’s office to tell him that Scott had classified documents in his home safe (Scott had tapes and photos of Oswald). Angleton went straight to Mexico City and took control of this material).

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On 5/8/2008 at 2:40 AM, John Simkin said:

 

One of the most interesting aspects of Jeff Morley’s book, “Our Man in Mexico”, is his account of Sylvia Duran, a Mexican employee in the Cuban consulate in Mexico City.

[Are the following your paraphrased extracts, John?]


At 11.00 a.m. on Friday, 27th September, 1963, Oswald told Duran that he wished to travel to the Soviet Union via Cuba. Duran told him that he would need a passport photograph to apply for a visa for Cuba. He returned an hour later with the photograph. Duran then told him he would need to visit the Soviet embassy to get the necessary paperwork. This he did but Vice Consul Oleg Nechiperenko [Weren't Kostikov and Yasov allegedly with Nechiporenko at the time?] informed him that the visa application would be sent to the Soviet embassy in Washington and would take about four months. Oswald then returned to the Cuban consulate at 4.00 and lied to Duran about his meeting with Nechiperenko. Duran checked Oswald’s story on the phone [with Kostikov, right?] and after a brief argument he left the consulate. Six times Oswald needed to pass the newly installed LIERODE camera [Were they having technical problems with that camera at the time?  Wasn't that particular camera installed on 9/27/63?].

The CIA surveillance program worked [which aspect are you referring to, here?] and on Monday, 30th September, Anne Goodpasture recorded details of Oswald’s visits to the Cuban consulate. As Goodpasture noted, the two types of “security” information that most interested the CIA station concerned “U.S. citizens initiating or maintaining contact with the Cuban and Soviet diplomatic installations” and “travel to Cuba by U.S. citizens or residents.” (page 182)

The CIA tape of the Oswald call was marked “urgent” and was delivered to the station within 15 minutes of it taking place. Win Scott read Goodpasture’s report and next to the transcript of Duran’s call to the Soviet embassy, he wrote: “Is it possible to identify”.

It later emerged that the CIA station in Mexico was already monitoring Sylvia Duran. According to David Phillips and Win Scott, the CIA surveillance program had revealed that Duran was having an affair with Carlos Lechuga, the former Cuban ambassador in Mexico City, who was in 1963 serving as Castro’s ambassador to the United Nations. We also now know that Lechuga was involved in the secret negotiations with Lisa Howard on behalf of JFK.

Soon after the assassination of JFK Win Scott contacted Luis Echeverria and asked his men to arrest Sylvia Duran. He also told Diaz Ordaz that Duran was to be held incommunicado until she gave all details of her contacts with Oswald. Scott then reported his actions to CIA headquarters. Soon afterwards, John Whitten, the CIA head of the Mexican desk, called Scott with orders from Tom Karamessines that Duran was not to be arrested. Win told them it was too late and that the Mexican government would keep the whole thing secret. Karamessines replied with a telegram that began: “Arrest of Sylvia Duran is extremely serious matter which could prejudice U.S. freedom of action on entire question of Cuban responsibility.”

What did Karamessines mean by this? [Good question!] Why [or what?] did he not want the Mexicans to find out? What we do know is that John Whitten was also surprised by Karamessines’ order and initially opposed sending the message to Scott.

Duran, her husband and five other people were arrested. Duran was “interrogated forcefully” (Duran was badly [really?] bruised during the interview). Echeverria reported to Scott that Duran had been “completely cooperative” and had made a detailed statement. This statement matched the story of the surveillance transcripts, with one exception. The tapes indicated that Duran made another call to the Soviet embassy on Saturday, 28th September. Duran then put an American on the line who spoke incomprehensible [Really?  I thought it was just "nearly incomprehensible"] Russian. This suggests that the man could not have been Oswald who spoke the language well.

Duran was released but was then rearrested and questioned about her relationship with Oswald. Despite being roughed up she denied having a sexual relationship with Oswald. Echeverria believed her and she was released. However, Duran later admitted to a close friend that she had dated Oswald while he was in Mexico City.

A week after the assassination Elena Garro reported that she had seen Oswald at a party held by people from the Cuban consulate in September 1963. The following week, June Cobb, a CIA informant, confirmed Oswald presence at the party. She also had been told that Oswald was sleeping with Duran. Win Scott reported this information to CIA headquarters but never got a reply. (page 241)

Why did the CIA want Sylvia Duran kept out of this story? One released document reveals that a Mexican source on the CIA payroll suggested that it would be very easy to recruit Duran as a spy. (page 210) Did Karamessines via Phillips recruit Duran as a spy? If so, Win Scott and John Whitten were kept out of the loop. Why? Was there an unofficial CIA operation involving Duran and Oswald? To be more correct, someone posing as Oswald.  [emphasis added by T. Graves]

It later emerged that when Duran was interviewed by the Mexican authorities soon after the assassination she described the man who visited the Cuban consul's office as being "blond-haired" and with "blue or green eyes" [Hmm .. Just like Nikolai Leonov!]. Neither detail fits in with the authentic Oswald. But these details had been removed from the statement by the time it reached the Warren Commission.  [Are transcripts of the Mexican interrogations available to us?]

Duran was interviewed by the House Select Committee on Assassinations in 1978. This testimony is classified. [Has it been declassified yet?] However, in 1979 Duran told the author, Anthony Summers that she told the HSCA that the man who visited the office was about her size (5 feet 3.5 inches). [Holy Toledo!  What a coincidence!  Blond-haired, blue-eyed Leonov was only 5' 6" or 5' 7" ! ] This created problems as Oswald was 5 feet 9.5 inches. When Summers showed Duran a film of Oswald taken at the time of his arrest, Duran said: "The man on the film is not like the man I saw here in Mexico City."

Win Scott died on 26th April, 1971, while he was negotiating with the CIA about publishing his memoirs that included an account of Oswald’s time in Mexico. Scott told Helms that he would not be talked out of publishing the book.

When Anne Goodpasture heard the news of Scott’s death she went straight to Jim Angleton’s office [Wasn't Goodpasture in Mexico City at the time?]  to tell him that Scott had classified documents in his home safe (Scott had tapes and photos of Oswald). Angleton went straight to Mexico City and took control of this material).

bumped with questions and observations

--  Tommy :sun

Edited by Thomas Graves
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On ‎5‎/‎8‎/‎2008 at 4:40 AM, John Simkin said:

...One of the most interesting aspects of Jeff Morley’s book, “Our Man in Mexico”, is his account of Sylvia Duran, a Mexican employee in the Cuban consulate in Mexico City...

Duran was released but was then rearrested and questioned about her relationship with Oswald. Despite being roughed up she denied having a sexual relationship with Oswald. Echeverria believed her and she was released. However, Duran later admitted to a close friend that she had dated Oswald while he was in Mexico City.

A week after the assassination Elena Garro reported that she had seen Oswald at a party held by people from the Cuban consulate in September 1963. The following week, June Cobb, a CIA informant, confirmed Oswald presence at the party. She also had been told that Oswald was sleeping with Duran. Win Scott reported this information to CIA headquarters but never got a reply. (page 241)

Why did the CIA want Sylvia Duran kept out of this story? One released document reveals that a Mexican source on the CIA payroll suggested that it would be very easy to recruit Duran as a spy. (page 210) Did Karamessines via Phillips recruit Duran as a spy? If so, Win Scott and John Whitten were kept out of the loop. Why? Was there an unofficial CIA operation involving Duran and Oswald? To be more correct, someone posing as Oswald.

It later emerged that when Duran was interviewed by the Mexican authorities soon after the assassination she described the man who visited the Cuban consul's office as being "blond-haired" and with "blue or green eyes". Neither detail fits in with the authentic Oswald. But these details had been removed from the statement by the time it reached the Warren Commission.

Duran was interviewed by the House Select Committee on Assassinations in 1978. This testimony is classified. However, in 1979 Duran told the author, Anthony Summers that she told the HSCA that the man who visited the office was about her size (5 feet 3.5 inches). This created problems as Oswald was 5 feet 9.5 inches. When Summers showed Duran a film of Oswald taken at the time of his arrest, Duran said: "The man on the film is not like the man I saw here in Mexico City."...

John,

Jeff Morley left out some important facts about Sylvia Duran -- critically important.

1.  Sylvia Duran was tortured by the Mexican Police, to beat out of her what they wanted to hear -- namely -- that the JFK assassination had been a Communist Plot.

2.  The CIA encouraged the Mexican Police in their activities -- just to make absolutely sure.

3.  The Mexican press made a fortune printing fictions about Sylvia Duran, especially sexy stories about her and Lee Harvey Oswald.  There was real money in it.

4.  Elena Garro, a fiction writer, decided to make some money by printing sexy fiction about her former friend, Sylvia Duran.

5.  The Warren Commission volumes are filled with "mistaken identity" cases featuring Lee Harvey Oswald.  Surely Mexico City had its share as well.

6.  After Sylvia Duran was traumatized by the Mexican Police (with CIA encouragement) and the Mexican press -- does anybody really believe that she would be truthful to American interviewers?

7.  The fact that she (and Azcue) would insist that "the person we saw at the Cuban Embassy didn't look anything like Lee Harvey Oswald," absolutely must be taken in the context of torture, beatings, social ostracism and blatant terror.

Regards,
--Paul Trejo

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On 5/4/2017 at 8:01 AM, Paul Trejo said:

John,

Jeff Morley left out some important facts about Sylvia Duran -- critically important.

1.  Sylvia Duran was tortured by the Mexican Police, to beat out of her what they wanted to hear -- namely -- that the JFK assassination had been a Communist Plot.

2.  The CIA encouraged the Mexican Police in their activities -- just to make absolutely sure.

3.  The Mexican press made a fortune printing fictions about Sylvia Duran, especially sexy stories about her and Lee Harvey Oswald.  There was real money in it.

4.  Elena Garro, a fiction writer, decided to make some money by printing sexy fiction about her former friend, Sylvia Duran.

5.  The Warren Commission volumes are filled with "mistaken identity" cases featuring Lee Harvey Oswald.  Surely Mexico City had its share as well.

6.  After Sylvia Duran was traumatized by the Mexican Police (with CIA encouragement) and the Mexican press -- does anybody really believe that she would be truthful to American interviewers?

7.  The fact that she (and Azcue) would insist that "the person we saw at the Cuban Embassy didn't look anything like Lee Harvey Oswald," absolutely must be taken in the context of torture, beatings, social ostracism and blatant terror.

Regards,
--Paul Trejo

 

Paul,

With all due respect, do you actually believe that the CIA forced the Mexican Police to force Sylvia Duran to describe, in late 1963 and early 1964, "Oswald" in such a way as to point a guilty finger at short (especially by Duran's own 5' 3.5" standards!), blond-haired, blue-eyed KGB-officer Nikolai Leonov, or did she tell them that bit more or less voluntarily between her brutal, brutal beatings in an attempt to get her to admit that she had sex with Lee Harvey Oswald and/or paid him money to kill JFK?

Why did both Sylvia Duran (in '63 and '78) and Eusebio Azcue (in '78) collectively describe the Oswald Impersonator (with whom they probably hadn't even dealt!) in such a way as to perfectly resemble KGB officer Nikolai Leonov?

--  Tommy :sun

 

Edited by Thomas Graves
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35 minutes ago, Thomas Graves said:

What did Duran specifically say after she was so brutally tortured by the Mexican Police ("with American encouragement") that would lead one to believe that the assassination had been a "Communist plot"?

What "mistaken identity" situation was Duran involved in?

Why did Duran and Azcue collectively describe the "Oswald" they'd allegedly dealt with in such a way as to perfectly jibe with KGB officer Nikolai Leonov's?

Did Duran and Azcue secretly tap out Morse code messages to each other from their respective torture cells to the effect of "Hey, Silvy, whaddya say we both say it was Komarad Leonov?  I mean, I mean, I mean .... His physical characteristics should be easy enough for us to keep straight even after they've ... OUCH! .... finished OUCH! .... torturing us .... .OUCH!

--  Tommy :sun

Tommy,

1.  Sylvia Duran knew better than to confess a lie to the Mexican Police -- because then the torture would have been doubled.  

2.  The "mistaken identity" was the widespread story that Lee Harvey Oswald attended a "twist party" with Sylvia Duran.

3.  Nikolai Leonov was a regular at the Cuban Embassy.  They didn't get much business, either, so he stood out.

4.  Duran and Azcue had offices in the same room.  Leonov was well-known to both of them.  It would only take a couple of seconds to coordinate.

Regards,
--Paul Trejo

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31 minutes ago, Paul Trejo said:

Tommy,

1.  Sylvia Duran knew better than to confess a lie to the Mexican Police -- because then the torture would have been doubled.  

2.  The "mistaken identity" was the widespread story that Lee Harvey Oswald attended a "twist party" with Sylvia Duran.

3.  Nikolai Leonov was a regular at the Cuban Embassy.  They didn't get much business, either, so he stood out.

4.  Duran and Azcue had offices in the same room.  Leonov was well-known to both of them.  It would only take a couple of seconds to coordinate.

Regards,
--Paul Trejo

 

"So," .....

Who impersonated Leonov on 9/27/63, then?

--  Tommy :sun

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31 minutes ago, Thomas Graves said:

"So," .....

Who impersonated Leonov on 9/27/63, then?

--  Tommy :sun

You tell me; Tommy -- it's like anything is a connection to anything in your CT.

Regards,
--Paul Trejo

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2 hours ago, Thomas Graves said:

Nice non-answer!

--  Tommy :sun

Tommy,

I answered your four questions quickly and accurately, and you didn't acknowledge.  What's up with that?

Regards,

--Paul Trejo

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23 minutes ago, Paul Trejo said:

Tommy,

I answered your four questions quickly and accurately, and you didn't acknowledge.  What's up with that?

Regards,

--Paul Trejo

Don't get all paranoid on me, Trejo.

I'm using a library's Wi-Fi, and the way they have it set up, if you forget to refresh your laptop's connection to said Wi-Fi every 90 minutes or so, you lose everything, and gotta start all over again.

Capiche?

--  Tommy :sun

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On 5/4/2017 at 11:41 AM, Paul Trejo said:

Tommy,

1.  Sylvia Duran knew better than to confess a lie to the Mexican Police -- because then the torture would have been doubled.  

2.  The "mistaken identity" was the widespread story that Lee Harvey Oswald attended a "twist party" with Sylvia Duran.

3.  Nikolai Leonov was a regular at the Cuban Embassy.  They didn't get much business, either, so he stood out.

4.  Duran and Azcue had offices in the same room.  Leonov was well-known to both of them.  It would only take a couple of seconds to coordinate.

Regards,
--Paul Trejo

Dear Paul,

According to the CIA report regarding the second Mexican interrogation of Duran, she said she didn't know anyone from the Soviet Embassy.

--  Tommy :sun

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4 hours ago, Thomas Graves said:

Dear Paul,

According to the CIA report regarding the second Mexican interrogation of Duran, she said she didn't know anyone from the Soviet Embassy.

--  Tommy :sun

Tommy,

By the second Mexican interrogation of Sylvia Duran, she had been beaten by them several times.  She was terrified.  Why doesn't that register with you?   

I repeat -- never at any time did Sylvia Duran ever say that she was describing Nikolai Leonov.  She described somebody that MIGHT be considered to be Leonov, or perhaps thousands of other people -- anybody but Lee Harvey Oswald.  She was officially terrified.

Sylvia Duran gave no name at all during that second Mexican interrogation -- only that she didn't know Lee Harvey Oswald, either before, during or after the JFK assassination.

Try to remember, Tommy -- the Mexican Police were trying to pin the JFK assassination on Sylvia Duran, as well as on Communist sympathizers in general.  Being a Communist in Mexico in 1963 was illegal.  It's not like the USA where we have so much freedom of speech.  Please try to remember this.  

Sylvia was terrified.  Imagine what these brutal Mexican Police would have done to her, just for saying the words, "Oh, yes, I know people from the Soviet Embassy."  It would not be pretty. 

Regards,
--Paul Trejo

Edited by Paul Trejo
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On 5/6/2017 at 12:36 PM, Paul Trejo said:

Tommy,

By the second Mexican interrogation of Sylvia Duran, she had been beaten by them several times.  She was terrified.  Why doesn't that register with you?   

I repeat -- never at any time did Sylvia Duran ever say that she was describing Nikolai Leonov.  

She described somebody that MIGHT be considered to be Leonov, or perhaps thousands of other people -- anybody but Lee Harvey Oswald.  She was officially terrified.

Sylvia Duran gave no name at all during that second Mexican interrogation -- only that she didn't know Lee Harvey Oswald, either before, during or after the JFK assassination.

Try to remember, Tommy -- the Mexican Police were trying to pin the JFK assassination on Sylvia Duran.  Being a Communist in Mexico in 1963 was illegal.  It's not like the USA where we have so much freedom of speech.  Please try to remember this.  

Sylvia was terrified.  Imagine what these brutal Mexican Police would have done to her, just for saying the words, "Oh, yes, I know people from the Soviet Embassy."  It would not be pretty. 

Regards,
--Paul Trejo

 

Dear Paul,

Geez, that's why I said, "in so many words."

Maybe you missed that part?

 

Regardless,  

What did Duran tell the Mexican police in late November, 1963?  "The guy was blond-haired and short," right?

 .....

How did Duran describe "Oswald" to the HSCA in 1978?

That "he" was:

1) "short" ... compared to her own 5' 3.5" or 5' 3.75"

2) "blond-haired"

3) "had blue or green eyes"

 

Does that sound like Lee Harvey Oswald to you?

 

--  Tommy :sun

 

Edited by Thomas Graves
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1 hour ago, Thomas Graves said:

What did Duran tell the Mexican police on 11/23/63?  "The guy was blond-haired and short," right?

How did Duran describe the same "guy" to the Mexican Police the second time they interrogated her (around 1/10/64)? --  (I don't know.  Do you, Paul?)

What did Duran tell the HSCA?  "He was quite short, blond-haired, and had blue or green eyes," right?

Did I forget anyone else to whom she described the guy she'd dealt with at the Cuban Consulate on 9/27/63?

--  Tommy :sun

Tommy,

You are still missing the intense Anticommunist culture in Mexico City 1963.

From the very start, Sylvia Duran knew she was going to be accused of a conspiracy to assassinate JFK.

That was the culture.

Her suspicions were correct -- she was repeatedly arrested and beaten to get her to confess to a Communist conspiracy.

Not only the Mexican Police, but also the US agencies like the FBI and the CIA were eager to hear what Duran had to say about Cuban-linked accomplices of Lee Harvey Oswald.

Sylvia Duran was trapped like a rat -- for the sole crime of being the last woman in Mexico City to see Lee Harvey Oswald.

Even our own FORUM Spartacus entry on Sylvia Duran continues the Mexican rumors that Sylvia had a romance with Oswald, and about Elena Garro de Paz's story about a "twist party" and a "Duran confession."

http://spartacus-educational.com/JFKduranS.htm

No -- I don't have transcripts from the second Duran interrogation by the Mexican Police.  From what I have read, they beat her while asking her if she had a sexual relationship with LHO, or if she saw LHO take money from anybody at the Cuban Embassy, or if she was part of the Communist conspiracy to kill JFK.  

From what I have read -- the CIA in Mexico City as well as FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover were eager to hear the results of the second interrogation of Sylvia Duran by the Mexican Police.  She did not crack.  So they subjected Gilberto Alverado (the guy who spread the rumor about the money) to a lie-detector test, and he did crack.

So, that was the end of it -- except that nothing Sylvia Duran ever said after that could ever be trusted.   Ever.

Regards,
--Paul Trejo

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