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John Connally and Doug Thompson


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A couple of years ago I posted this article by Doug Thompson, Is Deception the Best Way to Serve Your Country? (30th March, 2006) on my webpage on John Connally.

http://www.opednews.com/articles/opedne_do...ion_the_bes.htm

David Lifton has emailed me and asked if I could find anymore information on this story. Please post your thoughts on the Forum:

I met John Connally on a TWA flight from Kansas City to Albuquerque earlier that year. The former governor of Texas, the man who took one of the bullets from the assassination that killed President John F. Kenney, was headed to Santa Fe to buy a house.

The meeting wasn't an accident. The flight originated in Washington and I sat in the front row of the coach cabin. During a stop in Kansas City, I saw Connally get on the plane and settle into a first class seat so I walked off the plane and upgraded to a first class seat right ahead of the governor. I not only wanted to meet the man who was with Kennedy on that day in Dallas in 1963 but, as the communications director for the re-election campaign of Congressman Manuel Lujan of New Mexico, I thought he might be willing to help out on what was a tough campaign.

When the plane was in the air, I introduced myself and said I was working on Lujan's campaign. Connally's face lit up and he invited me to move to the empty seat next to him.

"How is Manuel? Is there anything I can do to help?"

By the time we landed in Albuquerque, Connally had agreed to do a fundraiser for Lujan. A month later, he flew back into New Mexico where Amy and I picked him up for the fundraiser. Afterwards, we took him to dinner.

Connolly was both gracious and charming and told us many stories about Texas politics. As the evening wore on and the multiple bourbon and branch waters took their effect, he started talking about November 22, 1963, in Dallas.

"You know I was one of the ones who advised Kennedy to stay away from Texas," Connally said. "Lyndon (Johnson) was being a real asshole about the whole thing and insisted."

Connally's mood darkened as he talked about Dallas. When the bullet hit him, he said he felt like he had been kicked in the ribs and couldn't breathe. He spoke kindly of Jackie Kennedy and said he admired both her bravery and composure.

I had to ask. Did he think Lee Harvey Oswald fired the gun that killed Kennedy?

"Absolutely not," Connally said. "I do not, for one second, believe the conclusions of the Warren Commission."

So why not speak out?

"Because I love this country and we needed closure at the time. I will never speak out publicly about what I believe."

We took him back to catch a late flight to Texas. He shook my hand, kissed Amy on the cheek and walked up the ramp to the plane.

We saw Connally and his wife a couple of more times when they came to New Mexico but he sold his house a few years later as part of a bankruptcy settlement. He died in 1993 and, I believe, never spoke publicly about how he doubted the findings of the Warren Commission.

Connnally's note serves as yet another reminder that in our Democratic Republic, or what's left of it, few things are seldom as they seem. Like him, I never accepted the findings of the Warren Commission. Too many illogical conclusions.

John Kennedy's death, and the doubts that surround it to this day, marked the beginning of the end of America's idealism. The cynicism grew with the lies of Vietnam and the senseless deaths of too many thousands of young Americans in a war that never should have been fought. Doubts about the integrity of those we elect as our leaders festers today as this country finds itself embroiled in another senseless war based on too many lies.

John Connally felt he served his country best by concealing his doubts about the Warren Commission's whitewash but his silence may have contributed to the growing perception that our elected leaders can rewrite history to fit their political agendas.

Had Connally spoken out, as a high-ranking political figure with doubts about the "official" version of what happened, it might have sent a signal that Americans deserve the truth from their government, even when that truth hurts.

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http://www.capitolhillblue.com/dtbio.htm

Doug Thompson

Founder & Publisher

Capitol Hill Blue

Doug Thompson sold his first story and photograph to a newspaper 48 years ago as a 10-year-old schoolboy in Farmville, Virginia, when the community, caught up in a fight over integration, closed the public schools and opened an all-white private school.

When his family relocated to the Blue Ridge Mountain community of Floyd, the 14-year-old Thompson took his photographs and stories to Pete Hallman, editor of the weekly Floyd Press. Hallman encouraged the young man to continue writing and taking photos, teaching him the ins and outs of the newspaper business.

Thompson went on to join the staff of The Roanoke Times where he covered the police beat, emerging racial turmoil in the city and tackled other tough subjects. His story about a young girl who obtained an abortion (illegal at the time) won the top feature writing award from the Virginia Press Association. Another, about street racers in the city, won a feature writing award.

After moving on to The Telegraph in Alton, Illinois, Thompson continued to win awards for writing and photography, capturing top prizes for news, feature and column writing from the Illinois Press Association.

Thompson took a sabbatical from newspapers in 1981 and moved to Washington to work on Capitol Hill, starting as a press secretary and working his way up to chief of staff before coming special assistant to the Ranking Minority Member of the House Science and Technology Committee. While serving in his Capitol Hill posts, Thompson served as a writer for the Voices for Victory program of the 1984 Reagan-Bush Presidential Campaign and as a field consultant for the National Republican Congressional Committee. In 1986, he took a leave of absence from his Capitol Hill post to serve as communications consultant to the campaign of Amory Houghton (R-NY). He taught political communications at the American Campaign Academy in suburban Washington and consulted on a number of other Congressional and statewide campaigns.

From 1987-1992, Thompson served as Vice President for Political Programs for The National Association of Realtors, running the nation's largest political action committee, issues mobilization program and independent expenditure campaigns. During that stint he became involved in campaign finance issues and was a founding board member of the Project for Comprehensive Campaign Reform. He later served as a senior communications consultant for The Eddie Mahe Company, a strategic business communications company and political consulting firm based in Washington.

But journalism remained Thompson's true love and he returned to his roots as a free-lance writer and photographer when The Eddie Mahe Company merged with the law firm of Foley & Lardner.

In 1994 he launched Capitol Hill Blue as the web's first political news site. He also started a web hosting company, web design business and communications consulting firm.

The Thompsons left Washington in 2004 and retired to a hilltop retreat in the Blue Ridge Mountains of Southwestern Virginia. He returns to Washington once a year to speak to journalism students at the Washington Center for Politics and Journalism and still has business interests in the National Capital Region but his days as a Washingtonian are over. In retirement, he photographs high school sports and covers courts and county government for his hometown paper.

Thompson is also active in community service, serving as a member of the board of advisors of the New River Valley Alcohol Safety Action Program (ASAP) and a mentor to young photographers for The National Association of Press Photographers.

Despite his success in new media, Thompson remains a newspaperman at heart and lives by the creed that it is the role of a newspaperman to "comfort the afflicted and afflict the comfortable."

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A couple of years ago I posted this article by Doug Thompson, Is Deception the Best Way to Serve Your Country? (30th March, 2006) on my webpage on John Connally.

http://www.opednews.com/articles/opedne_do...ion_the_bes.htm

David Lifton has emailed me and asked if I could find anymore information on this story. Please post your thoughts on the Forum:

I met John Connally on a TWA flight from Kansas City to Albuquerque earlier that year. The former governor of Texas, the man who took one of the bullets from the assassination that killed President John F. Kenney, was headed to Santa Fe to buy a house.

The meeting wasn't an accident. The flight originated in Washington and I sat in the front row of the coach cabin. During a stop in Kansas City, I saw Connally get on the plane and settle into a first class seat so I walked off the plane and upgraded to a first class seat right ahead of the governor. I not only wanted to meet the man who was with Kennedy on that day in Dallas in 1963 but, as the communications director for the re-election campaign of Congressman Manuel Lujan of New Mexico, I thought he might be willing to help out on what was a tough campaign.

When the plane was in the air, I introduced myself and said I was working on Lujan's campaign. Connally's face lit up and he invited me to move to the empty seat next to him.

"How is Manuel? Is there anything I can do to help?"

By the time we landed in Albuquerque, Connally had agreed to do a fundraiser for Lujan. A month later, he flew back into New Mexico where Amy and I picked him up for the fundraiser. Afterwards, we took him to dinner.

Connolly was both gracious and charming and told us many stories about Texas politics. As the evening wore on and the multiple bourbon and branch waters took their effect, he started talking about November 22, 1963, in Dallas.

"You know I was one of the ones who advised Kennedy to stay away from Texas," Connally said. "Lyndon (Johnson) was being a real asshole about the whole thing and insisted."

Connally's mood darkened as he talked about Dallas. When the bullet hit him, he said he felt like he had been kicked in the ribs and couldn't breathe. He spoke kindly of Jackie Kennedy and said he admired both her bravery and composure.

I had to ask. Did he think Lee Harvey Oswald fired the gun that killed Kennedy?

"Absolutely not," Connally said. "I do not, for one second, believe the conclusions of the Warren Commission."

So why not speak out?

"Because I love this country and we needed closure at the time. I will never speak out publicly about what I believe."

We took him back to catch a late flight to Texas. He shook my hand, kissed Amy on the cheek and walked up the ramp to the plane.

We saw Connally and his wife a couple of more times when they came to New Mexico but he sold his house a few years later as part of a bankruptcy settlement. He died in 1993 and, I believe, never spoke publicly about how he doubted the findings of the Warren Commission.

Connnally's note serves as yet another reminder that in our Democratic Republic, or what's left of it, few things are seldom as they seem. Like him, I never accepted the findings of the Warren Commission. Too many illogical conclusions.

John Kennedy's death, and the doubts that surround it to this day, marked the beginning of the end of America's idealism. The cynicism grew with the lies of Vietnam and the senseless deaths of too many thousands of young Americans in a war that never should have been fought. Doubts about the integrity of those we elect as our leaders festers today as this country finds itself embroiled in another senseless war based on too many lies.

John Connally felt he served his country best by concealing his doubts about the Warren Commission's whitewash but his silence may have contributed to the growing perception that our elected leaders can rewrite history to fit their political agendas.

Had Connally spoken out, as a high-ranking political figure with doubts about the "official" version of what happened, it might have sent a signal that Americans deserve the truth from their government, even when that truth hurts.

Perhaps the below "corrections" may serve to steer history into the correct direction.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

When the bullet hit him, he said he felt like he had been kicked in the ribs and couldn't breathe.

Which in itself fully clarifies that when he was yelling "My God they are going to kill us all"

http://mcadams.posc.mu.edu/russ/testimony/conn_n.htm

he said, "My God, they are going to kill us all."

--------------------------------------------------------------

Having observed a few persons take one through the chest, I have yet to see one who clearly stated anything like this.

Kinda makes one doubt that JBC was hit in the chest at this time.

------------------------------------------------------------------

and as he recoiled to the right, just crumpled like a wounded animal to the right, he said, "My God, they are going to kill us all."

Nope! Don't think so!

Personally, I prefer Jackie's descriptive adjective: "squealing like a pig".

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------

"I do not, for one second, believe the conclusions of the Warren Commission."

Well! Since the WC fairy tale also includes THE SHOT THAT MISSED, and you are/were fully aware that there was no SHOT THAT MISSED, then it would be entirely understandable as to why you would not only not believe the WC, but you would also know that it was an intentional lie.-------Largely to CYA!

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------

John Connally felt he served his country best by concealing his doubts about the Warren Commission's whitewash[/b]

How about: John Connally felt that he served HIS INTERESTS BEST by concealing the facts of the assassination!

With of course the primary aid and assistance of his political criminal/crony, LBJ.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Had Connally spoken out, as a high-ranking political figure

Then, his "high-ranking" political career would have been instantly shot as well!

And history would have accurately recorded that in lieu of THE SHOT THAT MISSED, we would have THE GOVERNOR WHO DUCKED!--------Right into the line of fire for the third shot, I might add!

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

but his silence may have contributed to the growing perception that our elected leaders can rewrite history to fit their political agendas.

In that regards, one just may want to check into what he and LBJ demonstratedly convinced people in Texas as to the "truth".

--------------------------------------------------------

Connnally's note serves as yet another reminder that in our Democratic Republic, or what's left of it, few things are seldom as they seem

-----------------------------------------------------------

To many, this is of course quite accurate, and JBC was among the top in pulling the wool over the eyes of most americans.

However, there are a few of us who possess the ability to "look thru" the BS, and not suprisingly, things are in fact EXACTLY AS THEY SEEM.

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A couple of years ago I posted this article by Doug Thompson, Is Deception the Best Way to Serve Your Country? (30th March, 2006) on my webpage on John Connally.

http://www.opednews.com/articles/opedne_do...ion_the_bes.htm

David Lifton has emailed me and asked if I could find anymore information on this story. Please post your thoughts on the Forum:

I met John Connally on a TWA flight from Kansas City to Albuquerque earlier that year. The former governor of Texas, the man who took one of the bullets from the assassination that killed President John F. Kenney, was headed to Santa Fe to buy a house.

The meeting wasn't an accident. The flight originated in Washington and I sat in the front row of the coach cabin. During a stop in Kansas City, I saw Connally get on the plane and settle into a first class seat so I walked off the plane and upgraded to a first class seat right ahead of the governor. I not only wanted to meet the man who was with Kennedy on that day in Dallas in 1963 but, as the communications director for the re-election campaign of Congressman Manuel Lujan of New Mexico, I thought he might be willing to help out on what was a tough campaign.

When the plane was in the air, I introduced myself and said I was working on Lujan's campaign. Connally's face lit up and he invited me to move to the empty seat next to him.

"How is Manuel? Is there anything I can do to help?"

By the time we landed in Albuquerque, Connally had agreed to do a fundraiser for Lujan. A month later, he flew back into New Mexico where Amy and I picked him up for the fundraiser. Afterwards, we took him to dinner.

Connolly was both gracious and charming and told us many stories about Texas politics. As the evening wore on and the multiple bourbon and branch waters took their effect, he started talking about November 22, 1963, in Dallas.

"You know I was one of the ones who advised Kennedy to stay away from Texas," Connally said. "Lyndon (Johnson) was being a real asshole about the whole thing and insisted."

Connally's mood darkened as he talked about Dallas. When the bullet hit him, he said he felt like he had been kicked in the ribs and couldn't breathe. He spoke kindly of Jackie Kennedy and said he admired both her bravery and composure.

I had to ask. Did he think Lee Harvey Oswald fired the gun that killed Kennedy?

"Absolutely not," Connally said. "I do not, for one second, believe the conclusions of the Warren Commission."

So why not speak out?

"Because I love this country and we needed closure at the time. I will never speak out publicly about what I believe."

We took him back to catch a late flight to Texas. He shook my hand, kissed Amy on the cheek and walked up the ramp to the plane.

We saw Connally and his wife a couple of more times when they came to New Mexico but he sold his house a few years later as part of a bankruptcy settlement. He died in 1993 and, I believe, never spoke publicly about how he doubted the findings of the Warren Commission.

Connnally's note serves as yet another reminder that in our Democratic Republic, or what's left of it, few things are seldom as they seem. Like him, I never accepted the findings of the Warren Commission. Too many illogical conclusions.

John Kennedy's death, and the doubts that surround it to this day, marked the beginning of the end of America's idealism. The cynicism grew with the lies of Vietnam and the senseless deaths of too many thousands of young Americans in a war that never should have been fought. Doubts about the integrity of those we elect as our leaders festers today as this country finds itself embroiled in another senseless war based on too many lies.

John Connally felt he served his country best by concealing his doubts about the Warren Commission's whitewash but his silence may have contributed to the growing perception that our elected leaders can rewrite history to fit their political agendas.

Had Connally spoken out, as a high-ranking political figure with doubts about the "official" version of what happened, it might have sent a signal that Americans deserve the truth from their government, even when that truth hurts.

Perhaps the below "corrections" may serve to steer history into the correct direction.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

When the bullet hit him, he said he felt like he had been kicked in the ribs and couldn't breathe.

Which in itself fully clarifies that when he was yelling "My God they are going to kill us all"

http://mcadams.posc.mu.edu/russ/testimony/conn_n.htm

he said, "My God, they are going to kill us all."

--------------------------------------------------------------

Having observed a few persons take one through the chest, I have yet to see one who clearly stated anything like this.

Kinda makes one doubt that JBC was hit in the chest at this time.

------------------------------------------------------------------

and as he recoiled to the right, just crumpled like a wounded animal to the right, he said, "My God, they are going to kill us all."

Nope! Don't think so!

Personally, I prefer Jackie's descriptive adjective: "squealing like a pig".

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------

"I do not, for one second, believe the conclusions of the Warren Commission."

Well! Since the WC fairy tale also includes THE SHOT THAT MISSED, and you are/were fully aware that there was no SHOT THAT MISSED, then it would be entirely understandable as to why you would not only not believe the WC, but you would also know that it was an intentional lie.-------Largely to CYA!

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------

John Connally felt he served his country best by concealing his doubts about the Warren Commission's whitewash[/b]

How about: John Connally felt that he served HIS INTERESTS BEST by concealing the facts of the assassination!

With of course the primary aid and assistance of his political criminal/crony, LBJ.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Had Connally spoken out, as a high-ranking political figure

Then, his "high-ranking" political career would have been instantly shot as well!

And history would have accurately recorded that in lieu of THE SHOT THAT MISSED, we would have THE GOVERNOR WHO DUCKED!--------Right into the line of fire for the third shot, I might add!

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

but his silence may have contributed to the growing perception that our elected leaders can rewrite history to fit their political agendas.

In that regards, one just may want to check into what he and LBJ demonstratedly convinced people in Texas as to the "truth".

--------------------------------------------------------

Connnally's note serves as yet another reminder that in our Democratic Republic, or what's left of it, few things are seldom as they seem

-----------------------------------------------------------

To many, this is of course quite accurate, and JBC was among the top in pulling the wool over the eyes of most americans.

However, there are a few of us who possess the ability to "look thru" the BS, and not suprisingly, things are in fact EXACTLY AS THEY SEEM.

Not long before he died, Connally relented and granted an interview to Robert Caro. LBJ had long been dead. Who knows what Connally told Caro about the assassination?

I first met Caro, who now is up in years also, in 1986 and when I asked him at a public meeting if he planned to discuss Mac Wallace in his LBJ biography, he grabbed the the lapels my suit and asked who I was and how he could talk to me further. I gave him my card but heard nothing more from him.

At this point late in his life I think Caro realizes that there is nothing to lose by telling what Connally and other LBJ cronies have confided in him about the assassination. His final book on LBJ may rewrite history.

No editing done.
Edited by Antti Hynonen
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  • 4 weeks later...
Douglas Caddy Posted Jun 13 2008, 04:21 PM

QUOTE(Thomas H. Purvis @ Jun 13 2008, 01:54 PM)

QUOTE(John Simkin @ Jun 13 2008, 11:40 AM)

A couple of years ago I posted this article by Doug Thompson, Is Deception the Best Way to Serve Your Country? (30th March, 2006) on my webpage on John Connally.

http://www.opednews.com/articles/opedne_do...ion_the_bes.htm

David Lifton has emailed me and asked if I could find anymore information on this story. Please post your thoughts on the Forum:

I met John Connally on a TWA flight from Kansas City to Albuquerque earlier that year. The former governor of Texas, the man who took one of the bullets from the assassination that killed President John F. Kenney, was headed to Santa Fe to buy a house.

The meeting wasn't an accident. The flight originated in Washington and I sat in the front row of the coach cabin. During a stop in Kansas City, I saw Connally get on the plane and settle into a first class seat so I walked off the plane and upgraded to a first class seat right ahead of the governor. I not only wanted to meet the man who was with Kennedy on that day in Dallas in 1963 but, as the communications director for the re-election campaign of Congressman Manuel Lujan of New Mexico, I thought he might be willing to help out on what was a tough campaign.

When the plane was in the air, I introduced myself and said I was working on Lujan's campaign. Connally's face lit up and he invited me to move to the empty seat next to him.

"How is Manuel? Is there anything I can do to help?"

By the time we landed in Albuquerque, Connally had agreed to do a fundraiser for Lujan. A month later, he flew back into New Mexico where Amy and I picked him up for the fundraiser. Afterwards, we took him to dinner.

Connolly was both gracious and charming and told us many stories about Texas politics. As the evening wore on and the multiple bourbon and branch waters took their effect, he started talking about November 22, 1963, in Dallas.

"You know I was one of the ones who advised Kennedy to stay away from Texas," Connally said. "Lyndon (Johnson) was being a real asshole about the whole thing and insisted."

Connally's mood darkened as he talked about Dallas. When the bullet hit him, he said he felt like he had been kicked in the ribs and couldn't breathe. He spoke kindly of Jackie Kennedy and said he admired both her bravery and composure.

I had to ask. Did he think Lee Harvey Oswald fired the gun that killed Kennedy?

"Absolutely not," Connally said. "I do not, for one second, believe the conclusions of the Warren Commission."

So why not speak out?

"Because I love this country and we needed closure at the time. I will never speak out publicly about what I believe."

We took him back to catch a late flight to Texas. He shook my hand, kissed Amy on the cheek and walked up the ramp to the plane.

We saw Connally and his wife a couple of more times when they came to New Mexico but he sold his house a few years later as part of a bankruptcy settlement. He died in 1993 and, I believe, never spoke publicly about how he doubted the findings of the Warren Commission.

Connnally's note serves as yet another reminder that in our Democratic Republic, or what's left of it, few things are seldom as they seem. Like him, I never accepted the findings of the Warren Commission. Too many illogical conclusions.

John Kennedy's death, and the doubts that surround it to this day, marked the beginning of the end of America's idealism. The cynicism grew with the lies of Vietnam and the senseless deaths of too many thousands of young Americans in a war that never should have been fought. Doubts about the integrity of those we elect as our leaders festers today as this country finds itself embroiled in another senseless war based on too many lies.

John Connally felt he served his country best by concealing his doubts about the Warren Commission's whitewash but his silence may have contributed to the growing perception that our elected leaders can rewrite history to fit their political agendas.

Had Connally spoken out, as a high-ranking political figure with doubts about the "official" version of what happened, it might have sent a signal that Americans deserve the truth from their government, even when that truth hurts.

Perhaps the below "corrections" may serve to steer history into the correct direction.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

When the bullet hit him, he said he felt like he had been kicked in the ribs and couldn't breathe.

Which in itself fully clarifies that when he was yelling "My God they are going to kill us all"

http://mcadams.posc.mu.edu/russ/testimony/conn_n.htm

he said, "My God, they are going to kill us all."

--------------------------------------------------------------

Having observed a few persons take one through the chest, I have yet to see one who clearly stated anything like this.

Kinda makes one doubt that JBC was hit in the chest at this time.

------------------------------------------------------------------

and as he recoiled to the right, just crumpled like a wounded animal to the right, he said, "My God, they are going to kill us all."

Nope! Don't think so!

Personally, I prefer Jackie's descriptive adjective: "squealing like a pig".

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------

"I do not, for one second, believe the conclusions of the Warren Commission."

Well! Since the WC fairy tale also includes THE SHOT THAT MISSED, and you are/were fully aware that there was no SHOT THAT MISSED, then it would be entirely understandable as to why you would not only not believe the WC, but you would also know that it was an intentional lie.-------Largely to CYA!

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------

John Connally felt he served his country best by concealing his doubts about the Warren Commission's whitewash[/b]

How about: John Connally felt that he served HIS INTERESTS BEST by concealing the facts of the assassination!

With of course the primary aid and assistance of his political criminal/crony, LBJ.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Had Connally spoken out, as a high-ranking political figure

Then, his "high-ranking" political career would have been instantly shot as well!

And history would have accurately recorded that in lieu of THE SHOT THAT MISSED, we would have THE GOVERNOR WHO DUCKED!--------Right into the line of fire for the third shot, I might add!

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

but his silence may have contributed to the growing perception that our elected leaders can rewrite history to fit their political agendas.

In that regards, one just may want to check into what he and LBJ demonstratedly convinced people in Texas as to the "truth".

--------------------------------------------------------

Connnally's note serves as yet another reminder that in our Democratic Republic, or what's left of it, few things are seldom as they seem

-----------------------------------------------------------

To many, this is of course quite accurate, and JBC was among the top in pulling the wool over the eyes of most americans.

However, there are a few of us who possess the ability to "look thru" the BS, and not suprisingly, things are in fact EXACTLY AS THEY SEEM.

Not long before he died, Connally relented and granted an interview to Robert Caro. LBJ had long been dead. Who knows what Connally told Caro about the assassination?

I first met Caro, who now is up in years also, in 1986 and when I asked him at a public meeting if he planned to discuss Mac Wallace in his LBJ biography, he grabbed the the lapels my suit and asked who I was and how he could talk to me further. I gave him my card but heard nothing more from him.

At this point late in his life I think Caro realizes that there is nothing to lose by telling what Connally and other LBJ cronies have confided in him about the assassination. His final book on LBJ may rewrite history.

Mr. Caddy,

It would be interesting if you could follow-up on your discussion from 20 years ago with Mr. Caro. I suspect Mr. Caro is familiar with the writings of Barr McClellan?

According to Wikipedia, Mr. Caro is 72 today, up in age perhaps, but not too far imo.

Regards,

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....Good Day John.... THOMPSON's article IS a a very interesting article.

I also choose to provide and link it with the scores of many other researchers' outstanding, valuable, important research articles and reports early on my JFK website, "Men of Courage," several years ago! (Always available for everyone here.... http://hometown.aol.com/DRoberdeau/ )

Best Regards in Research,

Don

Don Roberdeau

U.S.S. John F. Kennedy, CV-67, "Big John," Plank Walker

Sooner, or later, The Truth emerges Clearly

Discovery: ROSEMARY WILLIS Zapruder Film Documented 2nd Headsnap : Westward, Ultrafast, & Directly Towards the "Grassy Knoll"

Dealey Plaza Professionally-surveyed Map Detailing 11-22-63 Victims locations, Witnesses, Photographers, Suspected trajectories, Evidentiary artifacts, & Important information & considerations

President KENNEDY "Men of Courage: 4 Principles" speech, and a portion of fellow researchers articles and my research & discoveries, 1975 to present

T ogether

E veryone

A chieves

M ore

TEAMWORK.gif

National Terror Alert for the United States:

advisory7regional.gif

"When you have eliminated the impossible, what remains, however improbable, must be the truth."

---- Sherlock Holmes, "A Study In Scarlet," (1887) by A.C. DOYLE

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http://mcadams.posc.mu.edu/russ/testimony/conn_j.htm

Governor CONNALLY. We had--we had gone, I guess, 150 feet, maybe 200 feet, I don't recall how far it was, heading down to get on the freeway, the Stemmons Freeway, to go out to the hall where we were going to have lunch and, as I say, the crowds had begun to thin, and we could--I was anticipating that we were going to be at the hall in approximately 5 minutes from the time we turned on Elm Street.

We had just made the turn, well, when I heard what I thought was a shot. I heard this noise which I immediately took to be a rifle shot. I instinctively turned to my right because the sound appeared to come from over my right shoulder, so I turned to look back over my right shoulder, and I saw nothing unusual except just people in the crowd, but I did not catch the President in the corner of my eye, and I was interested, because once I heard the shot in my own mind I identified it as a rifle shot, and I immediately--the only thought that crossed my mind was that this is an assassination attempt.

So I looked, failing to see him, I was turning to look back over my left shoulder into the back seat, but I never got that far in my turn. I got about in the position I am in now facing you, looking a little bit to the left of center, and then I felt like someone had hit me in the back.

http://www.assassinationresearch.com/zfilm/z275.jpg

Must have had his eyes closed!

Now! For a little closer to the truth!

November 27, 1963

Martin Agronsky interview with JBC at Parkland Hospital:

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  • 12 years later...

I used Doug Thompson's fascinating article as part of the new epilogue to my revised series of essays The Twelve Who Built the Oswald Legend - let me know what you think.

Connally didn't believe Oswald was the shooter

Doug Thompson, the webmaster at Capitol Hill Blue, had dinner with John Connally in 1982. Connally told him "you know I was one of the ones who advised Kennedy to stay away from Texas. Lyndon was being a real asshole about the whole thing and insisted." Thompson asked Connally if he thought Oswald was the shooter. "Absolutely not.  I do not, for one second, believe the conclusions of the Warren Commission." Why didn't Connally speak out?  "Because I love this country and we needed closure at the time. I will never speak out publicly about what I believe."

Connally's actions are why Oswald was stuck without GI Bill benefits - something Oswald needed to fix

Nellie Connally wrote in her book From Love Field that John Connally personally signed the documents that gave Oswald an undesirable discharge.

Oswald hand-wrote a memo shortly before 11/22/63 describing his experience with "street agitation" - citing his recent arrest in New Orleans. He may have written this for his still-unknown contacts in Dallas.

In my opinion, Lee Oswald's note to Hosty and letter to the Soviets was motivated to be seen as a player in the world of espionage - this was his best shot to get his GI Bill benefits ASAP. When Oswald's room on Beckley was searched, all three of his key undesirable discharge rulings from 1960-1963 were found together among his few possessions in that tiny room.

I don't think that taking a pot shot at ex-Navy secretary John Connally or JFK from the highly insecure sixth floor of the book depository was a good way to make that happen. The way for Oswald to get his benefits was to make himself seen as an important player in the world of espionage - if he could figure out his place in the scheme of things.  

I think Oswald's 11/9/63 letter and his letter to Hosty at about the same time were two halting steps in that direction. I also think that Oswald was involved in doing some favors for someone in the tense behind-the-scenes atmosphere of 11/22. Why else would he head to the Texas Theatre, except to look for a contact? And why in the world would he not bring his handgun to work if he was planning to shoot the President? Only a crazy person would fail to bring his protection along with him if he wanted to get away. Anyone conducting a long-distance ambush is trying to get away.  Oswald was not crazy.

Meanwhile, it's a sure thing that the planners of the Kennedy assassination had access to the Oswald file. One glance at it would provide convincing evidence that Connally took away Oswald's military benefits - and, in turn, provide a factual foundation for the cover story. The Connally part of the cover story was a "spare part" that was never used - but it was available, if needed.

Navy counsel Andy Kerr's memoir A Journey Among the Good and the Great also backs up Kerr's account of  Connally's involvement in Oswald's loss of his GI Bill benefits. Kerr wrote that he advised Connally:

"In Oswald's case, my conclusions were that his complaint had no legal basis, his request was without merit, and that Connally should not involve himself in any way. 

This routing slip supports the story about how Connally deep-sixed Oswald's attempt to obtain an upgraded discharge by directing
This routing slip supports the story about how
Connally deep-sixed Oswald's attempt to obtain
an upgraded discharge by directing
"appropriate action".

"I recommended that he refer the letter to the commandant of the Marine Corps for 'appropriate action'." (Emphasis added.) This phrase meant, in clear officialese, that the secretary was washing his hands of the case. The commandant could do with it as he wished. No one could doubt that the result would be. It was a kiss-off.

"A day or two later, Connally called me into  his office. He had obviously read the entire file and was intrigued. We discussed the case for half an hour or so, and at the end he said, "I agree with you, Andy--this is the way we should handle it." He then signed that second piece of paper that sent Oswald's letter on its way, we thought, to oblivion."

And, in fact, that's precisely what happened. The Warren Commission has a memo dated 2/26/62 - three days after the purported cc from Connally to Fred Korth, at a time when Connally was clearing his desk as Secretary of the Navy to pass the reins to Korth - stating that the Oswald matter was being "routed to CMC (Commandant, Marine Corps) for 'appropriate action'."  (Emphasis added.)  

There's no sign that Fred Korth saw this memo. There's an initial "C" on the bottom - that may be from Connally. Connally's signature looks similar.

Instead, a week later, Oswald was sent a "kiss-off letter" from Brigadier General R. Tompkins of the Marine Corps, saying that your letter "was referred to me for reply".  

Kerr's colleague Hank Searles also corroborates Kerr's account. Searles recalled the morning that Kerr opened the Oswald letter, read it, and advised Connally to reject it. Are there any indications that Fred Korth ever saw any of Oswald's requests for a discharge upgrade?

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I hope I'm not derailing here, but - What is the definitive, or the earliest, source for Connally's supposed cry of "My God, they are going to kill us all"?

I seem to remember Connally in an interview admitting to that outburst and trying to explain it, but I'm not sure.

Edited by David Andrews
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1 hour ago, David Andrews said:

I hope I'm not derailing here, but - What is the definitive, or the earliest, source for Connally's supposed cry of "My God, they are going to kill us all"?

I seem to remember Connally in an interview admitting to that outburst and trying to explain it, but I'm not sure.

It's on Youtube, I think it's after his surgery and filmed in the hospital whilst he is in recovery but, one of the others in the car could have reported that earlier whilst he was incapacitated. 

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34 minutes ago, Chris Barnard said:

It's on Youtube, I think it's after his surgery and filmed in the hospital whilst he is in recovery but, one of the others in the car could have reported that earlier whilst he was incapacitated. 

Thanks.

"I did not see the President at any time either after the first, second, or third shots, but I assumed always that it was HE who was hit and no one else. I immediately, when I was hit, I said, "Oh, no, no, no." And then I said, "My God, they are going to kill us all." -- JC

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John:  Thanks for posting Doug Thompson's account. I believe it is an essential part of the history of Dallas.  The two main conclusions I believe we can draw, and this goes well beyond the issue of whether there was a "second assassin."   ((TO BE CONTINUED SHORTLY) . . . 

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3 hours ago, David Lifton said:

John:  Thanks for posting Doug Thompson's account. I believe it is an essential part of the history of Dallas.  The two main conclusions I believe we can draw, and this goes well beyond the issue of whether there was a "second assassin."   ((TO BE CONTINUED SHORTLY) . . . 

NOW CONTINUING:

1.  That Connally's account, to his friend (Doug Thompson) , makes clear he was shot in the chest -- from the front.

2.  That Connaally's account, to his friend (and if true) makes clear that he deliberately lied to the Warren Commission. He even admitted that to his friend.  And in fact, its worse than that; because (NOW GO TO Point #3):

3. Connally began telling this false story of "how" he was hit, goes all the way back to 11/22/63, within 30 mnutes (approx),

4. By simply arranging his statements in chronological order, on Tuesday 11/26. and -- I believe -- going back to Monday, 11/25; I discovered that this pattern (of lying) goes back to 11/22/22, in connection with his original admittance to Parkland (!) When asked by a wire service reporter how it happened, Gov. JC responded: "From behind, I think." (The reporter immediately telephoned put that on the wire (by telephone the UPI office), and it was piblished with a time-stamp of "1:15" PM, approx.  So Gov JC was providing false information about his wounding that early.

5. Here is further relevant data.  I don't have the energy to debate this issue here on this Internet thread, but note this: When I first  interviewed Nurse Doris Nelson, in December1982--she told me in no uncertain terms that (a) Gov. JC was shot from the front, and (b) there was no entry wound on the rear surface of his body (i.e., in the area of his right shoulder or armpit) when his shirt was first taken off his body.

DSL, 11/04/20 - 11:40 PM PST

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On 11/3/2020 at 2:42 PM, David Andrews said:

Thanks.

"I did not see the President at any time either after the first, second, or third shots, but I assumed always that it was HE who was hit and no one else. I immediately, when I was hit, I said, "Oh, no, no, no." And then I said, "My God, they are going to kill us all." -- JC

Re the issue of whether Gov JC said "all" (per his WC testimony) or "both" (per Manchester's DOP): I believe that "both" probably comes from Jackie;s interview with Manchester.

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