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The Ryder Cup Conspiracy


Guest Gary Loughran
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Guest Gary Loughran

In one fell swoop, Nick Faldo reminded the world why he has left a trail of destruction in his wake throughout his life. In a move which has shocked, players, caddies and coaches throughout the game, he has omitted Darren Clarke from his Ryder Cup squad. An obviously uncomfortable and far from truthful Faldo was unable to look anyone in the eye during the press conference as he tried to explain Clarke's omission.

After the similarly poor treatment of Paul McGinley it is tempting to classify Faldo as anti-Irish. I don't believe this to be the case, instead I believe he is pro English and had he another pick would have picked Dougherty anyway.

A normally effusive Padraig Harrington initially declined comment before blandly stating that Poulter and Casey were two solid picks. Azinger described Clarke as a lock and was shocked, if not delighted, at the absence of the in-form Ulsterman. Commentators and players across the European scene were barely able to contain their anger at the decision. Every American Caddy and player at the Fed-Ex Cup in Boston stated off the record their amazement. A poll at Gleneagles, the last qualifying tournament for European Ryder Cup hopefuls, revealed that one of 32 picked Poulter ahead of Clarke.

Another twist in this tale, and further proof, if needed, of Faldo's unwillingness to select a non-English player over the clearly favoured Poulter - was the alarming decision by Poulter to go against Faldo's request to play Gleneagles. A top 5 finish would have qualified Poulter for the team automatically, something that despite playing in every WGC and major he was unable to do. Instead Poulter decided to miss another cut on the US tour. Luckily for Faldo, Clarke's poor showing at Gleneagles allowed him minor justification in picking Poulter, in spite of his insubordination.

The fall-out, I think will affect European moral as well as impact negatively on the likeable Poulter. It will undoubtedly be a fillip for a US team struggling to win the Cup.

One must remember Clarke's participation in the 2006 Cup - 3 weeks after the death of his wife. A feat more remarkable than Tiger Wood's recent US Open victory, for many reasons. After the maelstrom and elation had alleviated, a tired Clarke played awfully during the 2007 qualifying period, many feeling he would quit the game. However, early this year he rededicated himself to golf winning twice in this period and having a top 6 finish at the last WGC - in doing so moving form 200+ to 56 in the world rankings.

Failure at the Ryder Cup will harm Ian Poulter, a man near breaking point in recent days. For his sake I hope Faldo's little Englander mindset works on this one occasion.

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In one fell swoop, Nick Faldo reminded the world why he has left a trail of destruction in his wake throughout his life. In a move which has shocked, players, caddies and coaches throughout the game, he has omitted Darren Clarke from his Ryder Cup squad. An obviously uncomfortable and far from truthful Faldo was unable to look anyone in the eye during the press conference as he tried to explain Clarke's omission.

After the similarly poor treatment of Paul McGinley it is tempting to classify Faldo as anti-Irish. I don't believe this to be the case, instead I believe he is pro English and had he another pick would have picked Dougherty anyway.

A normally effusive Padraig Harrington initially declined comment before blandly stating that Poulter and Casey were two solid picks. Azinger described Clarke as a lock and was shocked, if not delighted, at the absence of the in-form Ulsterman. Commentators and players across the European scene were barely able to contain their anger at the decision. Every American Caddy and player at the Fed-Ex Cup in Boston stated off the record their amazement. A poll at Gleneagles, the last qualifying tournament for European Ryder Cup hopefuls, revealed that one of 32 picked Poulter ahead of Clarke.

Another twist in this tale, and further proof, if needed, of Faldo's unwillingness to select a non-English player over the clearly favoured Poulter - was the alarming decision by Poulter to go against Faldo's request to play Gleneagles. A top 5 finish would have qualified Poulter for the team automatically, something that despite playing in every WGC and major he was unable to do. Instead Poulter decided to miss another cut on the US tour. Luckily for Faldo, Clarke's poor showing at Gleneagles allowed him minor justification in picking Poulter, in spite of his insubordination.

The fall-out, I think will affect European moral as well as impact negatively on the likeable Poulter. It will undoubtedly be a fillip for a US team struggling to win the Cup.

One must remember Clarke's participation in the 2006 Cup - 3 weeks after the death of his wife. A feat more remarkable than Tiger Wood's recent US Open victory, for many reasons. After the maelstrom and elation had alleviated, a tired Clarke played awfully during the 2007 qualifying period, many feeling he would quit the game. However, early this year he rededicated himself to golf winning twice in this period and having a top 6 finish at the last WGC - in doing so moving form 200+ to 56 in the world rankings.

Failure at the Ryder Cup will harm Ian Poulter, a man near breaking point in recent days. For his sake I hope Faldo's little Englander mindset works on this one occasion.

I know very little about golf and so I am not really in a position to comment. However, I will. You say you are not proposing an anti-Irish conspiracy. Could it be that it is an anti-Celtic conspiracy? After all, he did not select Colin Montgomerie either. Maybe it is an anti-old men conspiracy. Faldo is obviously convinced by his own form that young men are more consistent than old men.

These golfers are convinced that Faldo has made a serious mistake:

http://news.bbc.co.uk/sport1/hi/golf/7591012.stm

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I know very little about golf and so I am not really in a position to comment. However, I will. You say you are not proposing an anti-Irish conspiracy. Could it be that it is an anti-Celtic conspiracy? After all, he did not select Colin Montgomerie either. Maybe it is an anti-old men conspiracy. Faldo is obviously convinced by his own form that young men are more consistent than old men.

Quite possibly - he has after all left out the obvious Manx candidate for the team also :rolleyes: .

Faldo has selected younger players because he is deeply unpopular amongst his peers. Leaving out Clarke is crazy - there is less of a case for Montgomerie because of his recent poor form.

Faldo will be a very poor captain but he is fortunate to be faced with the weakest USA team I have ever seen. Europe will win despite their captain.

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Guest Gary Loughran
I know very little about golf and so I am not really in a position to comment. However, I will. You say you are not proposing an anti-Irish conspiracy. Could it be that it is an anti-Celtic conspiracy? After all, he did not select Colin Montgomerie either. Maybe it is an anti-old men conspiracy. Faldo is obviously convinced by his own form that young men are more consistent than old men.

These golfers are convinced that Faldo has made a serious mistake:

http://news.bbc.co.uk/sport1/hi/golf/7591012.stm

You might be on to something in thinking he is anti-old men or more pertinently, anti-those who he competed against. Faldo, a man who deliberately courts controversy, is universally reviled by his contemporaries in golf. However, since his extreme makeover at CBS and the Golf Channel, he has become something of a hit with the younger generation - who know him more for his anachronistic, olde English, public schoolboy type commentary - A generation that wasn't around, originally, to be insulted by Faldo. Be careful who you piss off on the way up because you'll meet them on the way down, does not apply to Faldo, as he has carefully avoided all those people in favour of young men who don't know him. Paul Azinger described him perfectly in a recent interview, using language that would be moderated here.

Faldo has respect, quite rightly, due to his Major and general golfing record, which is superb. However he is not respected as a person. In a sport of great champions he is unique in this repsect.

Edited by Gary Loughran
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Faldo has respect, quite rightly, due to his Major and general golfing record, which is superb. However he is not respected as a person. In a sport of great champions he is unique in this repsect.

Agreed. Bernard Gallacher (former Ryder Cup Captain) was once asked what Faldo brings to the team room, he answered "Faldo". When pressed "is that all" he answered "yes".

Mark James (another former Ryder Cup captain) once publicly binned a Ryder Cup good luck note from Faldo and non of his team objected.

Nick Faldo once went behind Sandy Lyle's back to get him disqualified from a tournament for a very trivial rules infringement and is also the man who thanked the press from "the heart of his bottom" in his 1992 open victory speech.

He is pretty much detested by his peer group hence the move to select kids for his team.

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The Ryder Cup is golf, is it?

For years I've been part of a conspiracy against watching golf. All the coincidence theorists out there would probably say it's just a coincidence that I and many others always watch something else when there's a golf tournament on the tube (I personally prefer things like beach volleyball, when the girls are at it). I'll just let them think that, since you can never change their minds anyway about any conspiracy.

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The Ryder Cup is golf, is it?

I am not surprised given recent history that our American brothers, here represented by the redoubtable Ron, pretend to forget the Ryder Cup.

http://www.rydercup.com/2008/europe/histor...st_results.html

We must all now seek to banish equally his comment about the pleasure he experiences from watching ladies beach volleyball, especially those amongst us who are visual learners :lol:

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  • 3 weeks later...
The Ryder Cup is golf, is it?

I am not surprised given recent history that our American brothers, here represented by the redoubtable Ron, pretend to forget the Ryder Cup.

http://www.rydercup.com/2008/europe/histor...st_results.html

We must all now seek to banish equally his comment about the pleasure he experiences from watching ladies beach volleyball, especially those amongst us who are visual learners :blink:

http://kellysgolfhistory.blogspot.com/

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Guest Gary Loughran
The Ryder Cup is golf, is it?

I am not surprised given recent history that our American brothers, here represented by the redoubtable Ron, pretend to forget the Ryder Cup.

http://www.rydercup.com/2008/europe/histor...st_results.html

We must all now seek to banish equally his comment about the pleasure he experiences from watching ladies beach volleyball, especially those amongst us who are visual learners :blink:

http://kellysgolfhistory.blogspot.com/

Nice article Bill. I enjoy reading most, if not all, your stuff, golf and JFK.

What do you think...US victory, for a change?? I would nearly like that (to spite Faldo), except I couldn't cheer against Garcia, Jiminez, Harrington, Stenson and McDowell...for various reasons my favourite European players. Smilarly I couldn't go against Weekly, Furyk and Cink who I like.

Kim could be a revelation, this kid has no fear. Then again it's usually about the hot putter.

Really wish Clarke was there, and despite poor showing I'm sure Monty would've won more points than he lost.

I'll go for a split in morning foursomes and fourballs this afternoon 4v4 at end of play. Really like, and can't wait to see, the 1st and last matches especially this morning (1:05pm my time). Should be great fun. When Sunday's singles are announced we should have a little competition to predict the 12 results...just for bragging rights. :) - you in? I'm sure Andy will gaze into his crystal ball. Being a Liverpool fan his luck is really in these days. :)

Edited by Gary Loughran
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Having watched the Opening Ceremony last night I may have to review my prediction for the current matches. Faldo's speech was predictably clumsy and graceless, largely about him, and an embarrassment to his team. Azinger on the other hand spoke well and introduced his team with a quiet, focussed and assured confidence.

A few years OK when Hal Sutton spent his speech blubbing about his wife and family I knew the Americans were beaten before they started.

If Europe win this time it will despite this 'arse' they have selected as captain :blink:

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Guest Gary Loughran
Having watched the Opening Ceremony last night I may have to review my prediction for the current matches. Faldo's speech was predictably clumsy and graceless, largely about him, and an embarrassment to his team. Azinger on the other hand spoke well and introduced his team with a quiet, focussed and assured confidence.

A few years OK when Hal Sutton spent his speech blubbing about his wife and family I knew the Americans were beaten before they started.

If Europe win this time it will despite this 'arse' they have selected as captain :blink:

Indeed, it was a speech from the David Brent handbook. He only seemed comfortable talking about himself and his family. In fact, I felt a little sorry for him. He genuinely seems to be uncomfortable in a public speaking role. Perhaps he is not such a bad person, just wholly inarticulate.

He would do well to get a few lessons from Jack Nicklaus in how to conduct oneself publicly. Now, Jack is a true legend.

Edited by Gary Loughran
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Having watched the Opening Ceremony last night I may have to review my prediction for the current matches. Faldo's speech was predictably clumsy and graceless, largely about him, and an embarrassment to his team. Azinger on the other hand spoke well and introduced his team with a quiet, focussed and assured confidence.

A few years OK when Hal Sutton spent his speech blubbing about his wife and family I knew the Americans were beaten before they started.

If Europe win this time it will despite this 'arse' they have selected as captain :rolleyes:

Indeed, it was a speech from the David Brent handbook. He only seemed comfortable talking about himself and his family. In fact, I felt a little sorry for him. He genuinely seems to be uncomfortable in a public speaking role. Perhaps he is not such a bad person, just wholly inarticulate.

He would do well to get a few lessons from Jack Nicklaus in how to conduct oneself publicly. Now, Jack is a true legend.

It's one thing to be a good orator and coach, and another thing to play good golf.

These things tend to go in trends, and it hasn't been in US favor since 1999 in Brookline, though as then, US has the home field advantage, and a good team of young rookies who haven't experienced losing a Ryder Cup match.

The Ryder and Walker Cups are not only unique in pitting nationalistic teams against each other, but in the way they play the game. Best ball, match rules, etc., change the nature of the tournament game.

Certainly in these circumstances, the coach and the rules and the cheers of celebrities, like Ali and even Tiger Woods, relegated to a spectator, can raise the level of play, but when it comes down to it, whoever putts best will win.

BK

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On another thread I have argued that outstanding football players are usually poor football managers/coaches. The main reason is that top players are usually very self-centred individuals who care little about improving other players ability. I am reminded of a talented artist who told me he intended giving up his teaching job. He said he realised he was a poor teacher because he only really cared about his own work. The same goes for Nick Faldo. He is a mean-spirited man who although clearly wanting the team to win, cannot change his personality in order to get the best out of his team. However, that does not mean the US will win the Ryder Cup. Europe has some talented players and might win despite of Faldo instead of because of him.

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On another thread I have argued that outstanding football players are usually poor football managers/coaches. The main reason is that top players are usually very self-centred individuals who care little about improving other players ability. I am reminded of a talented artist who told me he intended giving up his teaching job. He said he realised he was a poor teacher because he only really cared about his own work. The same goes for Nick Faldo. He is a mean-spirited man who although clearly wanting the team to win, cannot change his personality in order to get the best out of his team. However, that does not mean the US will win the Ryder Cup. Europe has some talented players and might win despite of Faldo instead of because of him.

I always thought Nick Faldo would make a great "James Bond" in the movies. I always thought he could pull off that character.

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...is also the man who thanked the press from "the heart of his bottom" in his 1992 open victory speech.

I've no time for Faldo, but you've got to admit, that is a great one-liner! Albeit, not his own of course ;)

Edited by Dave Greer
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