Jump to content
The Education Forum

My "new" image galleries Website


Robin Unger
 Share

Recommended Posts

Thanks to the generousity of Duncan MacRae i now have a new home for

my image galleries.

This has been a long time in coming and is an on going " Work in progress "

http://www.jfkassassinationforum.com/gallery

Fantastic work Robin. I look forward to checking back every now and again. Really a terrific start.

I hope I can contribute....

- lee

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks to the generousity of Duncan MacRae i now have a new home for

my image galleries.

This has been a long time in coming and is an on going " Work in progress "

http://www.jfkassassinationforum.com/gallery

Fantastic work Robin. I look forward to checking back every now and again. Really a terrific start.

I hope I can contribute....

- lee

Hi Lee.

Great to hear from you again.

Lee you already have contributed.

The book you sent me in the mail " Trasks Pictures of the pain " provided some of the best Scans in the Image gallery.

And no one could forget that " CLASSIC " Cancellare image you obtained from Ebay, and generously shared with the forums.

Keep in touch Lee.

My Email:

quaneeri2@yahoo.com

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Robin,

Just a quick technical note. How did you get permission from the copyright holders (or are the images in the public domain) to publish online?

When R. Groden approached my organization a few years back, the largest stumbling block to seriously considering taking on his collection (besides the fact he wanted to sell it to us for huge bucks) was that he owned copyright to virtually none of the images, and so we wouldn't be able to post an online collection without a bootload of legwork.

Thanks,

Rob

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Robin,

Just a quick technical note. How did you get permission from the copyright holders (or are the images in the public domain) to publish online?

When R. Groden approached my organization a few years back, the largest stumbling block to seriously considering taking on his collection (besides the fact he wanted to sell it to us for huge bucks) was that he owned copyright to virtually none of the images, and so we wouldn't be able to post an online collection without a bootload of legwork.

Thanks,

Rob

The images in my collection can already be found in various galleries and forums online, and as such are already ( in the public domain. )

Should anyone have a serious concern regarding "Copyright" if they contact me, i will have the images immediately removed.

I hope that answers your question. !

Edited by Robin Unger
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks to the generousity of Duncan MacRae i now have a new home for

my image galleries.

This has been a long time in coming and is an on going " Work in progress "

http://www.jfkassassinationforum.com/gallery

Fantastic work Robin. I look forward to checking back every now and again. Really a terrific start.

I hope I can contribute....

- lee

Hi Lee.

Great to hear from you again.

Lee you already have contributed.

The book you sent me in the mail " Trasks Pictures of the pain " provided some of the best Scans in the Image gallery.

And no one could forget that " CLASSIC " Cancellare image you obtained from Ebay, and generously shared with the forums.

Keep in touch Lee.

My Email:

quaneeri2@yahoo.com

Robin, I like your site very much. I uploaded here one of the scariest pictures I've ever seen. It's of the front section of the limo, racing to Parkland and beyond a man is on a rooftop with a rifle. He really wasn't going to get out of there alive.

Kathy C

Edited by Kathleen Collins
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Robin,

Just a quick technical note. How did you get permission from the copyright holders (or are the images in the public domain) to publish online?

When R. Groden approached my organization a few years back, the largest stumbling block to seriously considering taking on his collection (besides the fact he wanted to sell it to us for huge bucks) was that he owned copyright to virtually none of the images, and so we wouldn't be able to post an online collection without a bootload of legwork.

Thanks,

Rob

The images in my collection can already be found in various galleries and forums online, and as such are already ( in the public domain. )

Should anyone have a serious concern regarding "Copyright" if they contact me, i will have the images immediately removed.

I hope that answers your question. !

Robin and Robert,

While it would be difficult to determine the origin and ownership of some of Groden's materials, and would be unwise to buy them at any price, I would think that if he donated them to a library they should be preserved for posterity.

As for posting assassination photos on the internet, they should be permited under the fair use doctrine, which would hold true if they are of historical or educational interest and no profit is made, which seems to be the case.

But copyright shouldn't be used as an excuse to prevent fair use of histoircal material or hide evidence of a crime.

BK

http://www.copyright.com/ccc/viewPage.do?pageCode=cr10-n

Fair Use

The concept of fair use can be confusing and difficult to apply to particular uses of copyright protected material. Understanding the concept of fair use and when it applies may help ensure your compliance with copyright law.

Fair use is a uniquely U.S. concept, created by judges and enshrined in the law. Fair use recognizes that certain types of use of other people's copyright protected works do not require the copyright holder's authorization. In these instances, it is presumed the use is minimal enough that it does not interfere with the copyright holder's exclusive rights to reproduce and otherwise reuse the work.

Fair use is primarily designed to allow the use of the copyright protected work for commentary, parody, news reporting, research and education. However, fair use is not an exception to copyright compliance so much as it is a "legal defense." That is, if you use a copyright protected work and the copyright owner claims copyright infringement, you may be able to assert a defense of fair use, which you would then have to prove.

Section 107 of the United States Copyright Act lists four factors to help judges determine, and therefore to help you predict, when content usage may be considered "fair use."

  1. The purpose and character of the use, including whether such use is of a commercial nature or is for nonprofit, educational purposes. If a particular usage is intended to help you or your organization to derive financial or other business-related benefits from the copyright material, then that is probably not fair use.
  2. The nature of the copyrighted work. Use of a purely factual work is more likely to be considered fair use than use of someone's creative work.
  3. The amount and substantiality of the portion used in relation to the copyright protected work as a whole. There are no set page counts or percentages that define the boundaries of fair use. Courts exercise common-sense judgment about whether what is being used is too much of, or so important to, the original overall work as to be beyond the scope of fair use.
  4. The effect of the use on the potential market for or value of the copyright protected work. This factor looks at whether the nature of the use competes with or diminishes the potential market for the form of use that the copyright holder is already employing, or can reasonably be expected soon to employ, in order to make money for itself through licensing.
    At one extreme, simple reproduction of a work (i.e., photocopying) is commonly licensed by copyright holders, and therefore photocopying in a business environment is not likely to be considered fair use.
    At the other extreme, true parody is more likely to be considered fair use because it is unlikely that the original copyright holder would create a parody of his or her own work.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Robin,

Just a quick technical note. How did you get permission from the copyright holders (or are the images in the public domain) to publish online?

When R. Groden approached my organization a few years back, the largest stumbling block to seriously considering taking on his collection (besides the fact he wanted to sell it to us for huge bucks) was that he owned copyright to virtually none of the images, and so we wouldn't be able to post an online collection without a bootload of legwork.

Thanks,

Rob

The images in my collection can already be found in various galleries and forums online, and as such are already ( in the public domain. )

Should anyone have a serious concern regarding "Copyright" if they contact me, i will have the images immediately removed.

I hope that answers your question. !

Robin and Robert,

While it would be difficult to determine the origin and ownership of some of Groden's materials, and would be unwise to buy them at any price, I would think that if he donated them to a library they should be preserved for posterity.

As for posting assassination photos on the internet, they should be permited under the fair use doctrine, which would hold true if they are of historical or educational interest and no profit is made, which seems to be the case.

But copyright shouldn't be used as an excuse to prevent fair use of histoircal material or hide evidence of a crime.

BK

</a><a href="http://www.copyright.com/ccc/viewPage.do?pageCode=cr10-n" target="_blank">http://www.copyright.com/ccc/viewPage.do?pageCode=cr10-n

Fair Use

The concept of fair use can be confusing and difficult to apply to particular uses of copyright protected material. Understanding the concept of fair use and when it applies may help ensure your compliance with copyright law.

Fair use is a uniquely U.S. concept, created by judges and enshrined in the law. Fair use recognizes that certain types of use of other people's copyright protected works do not require the copyright holder's authorization. In these instances, it is presumed the use is minimal enough that it does not interfere with the copyright holder's exclusive rights to reproduce and otherwise reuse the work.

Fair use is primarily designed to allow the use of the copyright protected work for commentary, parody, news reporting, research and education. However, fair use is not an exception to copyright compliance so much as it is a "legal defense." That is, if you use a copyright protected work and the copyright owner claims copyright infringement, you may be able to assert a defense of fair use, which you would then have to prove.

Section 107 of the United States Copyright Act lists four factors to help judges determine, and therefore to help you predict, when content usage may be considered "fair use."

  1. The purpose and character of the use, including whether such use is of a commercial nature or is for nonprofit, educational purposes. If a particular usage is intended to help you or your organization to derive financial or other business-related benefits from the copyright material, then that is probably not fair use.
  2. The nature of the copyrighted work. Use of a purely factual work is more likely to be considered fair use than use of someone's creative work.
  3. The amount and substantiality of the portion used in relation to the copyright protected work as a whole. There are no set page counts or percentages that define the boundaries of fair use. Courts exercise common-sense judgment about whether what is being used is too much of, or so important to, the original overall work as to be beyond the scope of fair use.
  4. The effect of the use on the potential market for or value of the copyright protected work. This factor looks at whether the nature of the use competes with or diminishes the potential market for the form of use that the copyright holder is already employing, or can reasonably be expected soon to employ, in order to make money for itself through licensing.
    At one extreme, simple reproduction of a work (i.e., photocopying) is commonly licensed by copyright holders, and therefore photocopying in a business environment is not likely to be considered fair use.
    At the other extreme, true parody is more likely to be considered fair use because it is unlikely that the original copyright holder would create a parody of his or her own work.

Thank you William.

Cheers.

Robin.

Thanks for the Image Kathleen.

Robin.

Edited by Robin Unger
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi Robin

Great site,many thanks

Jim.

Thanks Jim.

I am adding more files every day.

I now have a "Guestbook" on my image site

Please sighn the book and leave your comments. !

Thanks to Duncan for hosting the site and providing the Guestbook.

Edited by Robin Unger
Link to comment
Share on other sites

In the B/W image below, could it be the same woman in blue who can seen in the Dorman frame standing next to Rosemary Willis.

They both have short sleeve dresses, are holding a camera in there hand,and appear to have a very similar appearance.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

In the B/W image below, could it be the same woman in blue who can seen in the Dorman frame standing next to Rosemary Willis.

They both have short sleeve dresses, are holding a camera in there hand,and appear to have a very similar appearance.

Those are two different women Robin, the woman running in Dorman is wearing a mutli-colored shirt with a sleeve length above the elbow, the lady in the B/W image has on a single color shirt that has a sleeve length beyond the elbow.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Please sign in to comment

You will be able to leave a comment after signing in



Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...