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Several clarifications: I erred in putting Ft Bragg next to NSA when I meant Ft Meade. McMicking was the colonel left in charge of G-2 in Manila when MacArthur and his inner circle moved to Tokyo, and Prouty was on the G-2 staff when Lansdale arrived from the States. McMicking was already a very rich man, having married into the Zobel family long before Pearl Harbor, so he was part of the clique around MacArthur that included Whitney (MacArthur's attorney) and Willoughby (MacArthur's "lovable fascist"). When MacArthur put Whitney in charge of intel, instead of Willoughby, MacArthur gave Willoughby G-2. While this clique was in Tokyo, Lansdale reported initially to Col. McMicking in Manila. In Tokyo it was Whitney who drafted the Japanese constitution, while Willoughby was liberating Col. Tsuji, and Kodama, etc., and putting them to work snuffing leftists and liberals in Japan, and staging provocations in South Korea that led to reprisals by North Korea, and so forth. This MacArthur clique (including Herbert Hoover) was incredibly rich, as was McMicking and other clique members in Manila, when Santa Romana and Lansdale began recovering the troves of war loot in Luzon and they all became infinitely richer. The war loot was moved by ship from Subic and in numerous cases by plane to Hong Kong or Australia where it entered Paul Helliwell's network of banks with the help of Lansky and others, and dispersed in so many ways it became hard to trace thereafter. However, McMicking, promoted to general, and already a multimillionaire in 1945, eventually spent billions in Spain on real estate, and passed on huge sums to his heirs including his nephew, who is the partner of Howard Leach, who financed the Florida recount in 2000. What tangled webs we weave.

Well, thats a mouthful as they say, Helliwell, Willoughby, Fort Meade cryptography, American Gold, there is a lot of history in there. Grateful for info., One area I am fascinated

with is the Chronology of Prouty as liason between the White House and Pentagon, as I recall Prouty served in that capacity in two different time frames, and Alexander Haig

I believe, was situated in the interim between. And I am talking right around the 1963 era.......

I found some complimentary information on the Philippines/McMicking, etc, which I believe will pass muster.

page 91, Creating an American Lake: United States Imperialism and Strategic Security in the Pacific Basin, 1945-1947

Contributions in Military Studies, 0883-6884 ; No. 198

by Hal M. Friedman

Publication: Westport, Conn. Greenwood Press, 2001.

In terms of Philippine-American relations and the Asian nations’ perceptions about US negotiations for Philippine base rights, McNutt’s observations turned up ‘‘incidental intelligence’’ for the Secretary of State.

Claiming that there was a lack of ‘‘factual’’ information as to developments in the Philippines and the mutual nature of the Philippines Base Agreement, McNutt noted that there was no broad ‘‘comprehension’’ of US policy in the nations he visited and that the United States was being perceived as an imperialistic power even in the presses of some European nations. Especially citing perceptions in India, Egypt, Iraq, Greece, and Spain, the United States was supposedly not receiving the ‘‘acclaim’’ which its base agreement should have accrued to it because US information service outlets had not had the opportunity to exploit US Philippine policy as a ‘‘pure form’’ of the United States’ postwar international altruism. McNutt felt, however, that the Philippines policy could be used to ‘‘advance and rationalize’’ American foreign policy goals to these skeptical nations if it was ‘‘appropriately’’ presented.

Claiming that there was a lack of ‘‘factual’’ information as to developments in the Philippines and the mutual nature of the Philippines Base Agreement, McNutt noted that there was no broad ‘‘comprehension’’ of US policy in the nations he visited and that the United States was being perceived as an imperialistic power even in the presses of some European nations. Especially citing perceptions in India, Egypt, Iraq, Greece, and Spain, the United States was supposedly not receiving the ‘‘acclaim’’ which its base agreement should have accrued to it because US information service outlets had not had the opportunity to exploit US Philippine policy as a ‘‘pure form’’ of the United States’ postwar international

McNutt recounted that there was a general impression in India, Egypt, and Iraq that the United States had granted the Philippines independence unwillingly, and he had a difficult time digesting that the independence was seen essentially as a sham or ‘‘false independence.’’ Citing the approval of the Philippine Senate of the Military Bases Agreement, though not the Philippine leadership’s lack of choice in accepting the US presence, McNutt then stated that he was ‘‘astounded’’ to find that people in Egypt and India held little differentiation between Great Britain and the United States. Observing the Pan-Asian Conference while in India, McNutt even asserted that anti-US thought was an infiltrated ‘‘Communist Party line,’’ a line of thought which he also found in Siam, Egypt, Iraq, and Sweden

McNutt ended with a plea for a US information campaign, in conjunction with a program by the Philippine Government, to use all available ‘‘information outlets’’ in promoting US prestige vis-à-vis the Philippine Republic. A presentation of ‘‘factual information’’ would go far, he thought, to demonstrate to the world that US policy would help the Philippines achieve economic stability, autonomy, and reciprocity with the United States. Communist propaganda, he argued, must be ‘‘counteracted’’ in these nations and the potential interest in the development of a ‘‘… western type of democracy in the Orient is practically unlimited. The citation of Philippine-American relations would do much to restore the repute of the United States as an unselfish force in world affairs.’’

Soviet charges of imperialism and American defensive counter charges are a final fascinating case study of this US ignorance about its own arrogance. In October 1946 and January 1947, Captain Roland Pryce, Deputy Naval Advisor to Secretary of State Byrnes, the Office of Naval Intelligence, and the State Department’s Office of Intelligence Coordination and Liaison all put out memoranda analyzing Soviet political, press, and radio reactions to the fall 1946 US Draft Trusteeship Agreement in particular and toward US Pacific policy in general.

Also See AFWESPAC

MacArthur to Hull, November 30, 1946, and December 14, 1946, both found in RG 9: Radiogram, AFMIDPAC, MacArthur Memorial Archives. See also Weyland to Spaatz, December 11, 1946, folder ‘‘Alaska’’, box 256, Chief of Staff File, 1946–1948, Carl Spaatz Papers, Manuscript Division, Library of Congress.

See Griswold to Moore, January 26, 1947, RG 9: Radiograms, MARBO, MacArthur Memorial Archives.

More on McMicking

See Connie McHugh and Joseph and Mercedes McMicking

Joseph R. and Mercedes Z. McMicking were born in the Philippine Islands in the early part of the 20th Century. JRM, as he was called, came to California where he attended Stanford University. In 1931 he returned to the Philippines, married Mercedes Zobel and started a long business career where he became the managing partner and visionary of the Ayala group of companies.

McMicking was a member of General MacArthur’s staff throughout World War II, attaining the rank of Colonel in the United States Army. Returning to the Philippines with the liberation in 1945, he re-joined his wife, Mercedes, and resumed his successful business career both in Manila and San Francisco.

In 1948, in San Francisco, JRM and his brother, Henry A. McMicking, formed McMicking and Company – one of the first Venture Capital firms in California. They were instrumental in funding Ampex Corporation, the pioneer in developing audio and videotape technology. Until his death in 1990, Joseph R. McMicking was actively involved in Venture Capital in the Bay Area and his business interests in the Philippines and in Spain. .

Joseph and Mercedes McMicking were always part of the local San Francisco philanthropic community. They also generously supported children’s charities and education in the Philippines. Joseph and Mercedes McMicking were the founders and principal benefactors of the Filipinas Foundation in Manila, Philippines. Now renamed the Ayala Foundation, it is one of the leading private foundations in the Philippines.

http://mcmickingfoundation.org/mcmicking-history.shtml

http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showthread.php?t=328899&pp=25&page=35

What did you think about Victor Oswald, I thought that was fairly significant.

John Dolva, Regarding a connection between Ewald Peters, the ASC and Albert Osborne, John Howard Bowen, I suppose

anything is possible, I do know that in Mary Ferrell's chronologies, he was staying at the Spur Hotel in Houston, Texas on October 15th, 1963,

then supposedly, again according to the chronology, the very next day he writes from Mexico c/o American Express to the Canadian Consulate

in New Orleans, thanking them for their kindness in getting his passport isssued, the letter ostensibly contains candy, which is returned.

http://www.maryferrell.org/mffweb/archive/viewer/showDoc.do?docId=40391&relPageId=207

October 18th-19th 1963, he is at the William Len Hotel in Memphis, Tennessee.

October 20th 1963, Charlotte, North Carolina Y.M.C.A.

Backtracking a bit......

June 1963 - Albert Osborne works for the Tyler Nursery Company, Tyler Texas

and as a gardener in various places including Austin, Texas WC 25/47

http://www.maryferrell.org/mffweb/archive/viewer/showDoc.do?absPageId=485040

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It's hard to describe briefly the self-induced misconception Americans have of their role in the Philippines, to this day. If you are an evangelical christian missionary, you have your own parallax. If you're in the military, diplomat, attorney, banker, sama-sama. But if you try hard enough to look at characters and events, motivations, consequences, without being in any self-induced construct, and just look at what happened, and who did what to whom, and what deceit and distortions sooner or later become evident, it's horrifying, or nauseating.

I was first in Manila in 1947, and countless times since then to many of the islands in PI, and became acquainted with a lot of people including Prouty, Lansdale, Bohannen, and have researched and written eleven investigative books that cover all parts of East and Southeast Asia -- but also involve the Philippines. So, things keep clarifying as the decades pass. I spent years researching The Marcos Dynasty and over $100K on research help (aside from my wife and co-author who is a professional researcher). Then Lords of the Rim, and Gold Warriors. Three years ago I was asked to do a book based on a foot-high stack of G-2 documents newly passed over to the National Archives, and referred to as The Manila Project. These were the collected reports of agents for G-2, McMicking, Lansdale, Bohannen, etc., concerning Lansdale's efforts to make the Huks and thousands of unaffiliated farmers in Luzon, look like crazed Marxist revolutionaries, requiring millions of dollars, heavy military support, before they overthrew MacArthur's current postwar puppet regime. Since there was no serious existing evidence of threatening Marxist activity, it was necessary to generate false evidence. There were a bunch of young screwball Yanks messing around in Manila's underworld trying to get rich quick and easy, and attention was focussed on scores of them, until a young White Russian emigre arrived from Shanghai working for a Dutch trading and shipping company buying and refurbishing surplus US cargo vessels to sell to Chinese businessman in Shanghai. This White Russian was absurdly innocent and had left Siberia with his parents when he was just a child, first to Japan, then to Shanghai, where he married a very innocent White Russian emigre, and had a little boy. Lansdale chose him to be the evil Kremlin agent financing and arming the Huks (which Lansdale and Bohannen very clearly knew was not true -- they might be called evil but not stupid).

In the course of digesting all these many hundreds of agent's reports, and memos from Lansdale and Bohannen, and going back over everything I'd worked on about the Philippines for half a century, I realized that the American role in the Philippines was far more disgraceful, deceitful, and outrageous than I had ever imagined. I realized that I was still just scraping the surface, but I found some comfort in reading more recent reassessments of the Huk thing, written by current US military analysts who, having their own viewpoint, came to many of the same conclusions I was reaching (like the fact that Willoughby was totally incompetent in his strategic and tactical assessments, blatantly in New Guinea but a long history of simple stupidity). This is what I used as the clockwork inside RED SKY, which was the rather small, compact book that emerged, and is now available at Amazon and Kindle. As someone once said about Subic Naval Base and Clark AFB, the Philippines had become America's "fellatrix". Shameful, but inarguable. Despite its brevity, I think it does much to clarify both the US and Philippine role, which is indeed an obscenity.

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Good to hear from you again, Mr. Seagrave. I look forward to getting my copy of Red Sky. I spent a lot of time in the Philippines while I was teaching English in Korea and Taiwan. It is too bad The Philippines did not accept statehood when they had the chance.

An Amazon review:

I first met the authors after reviewing Gold Warriors: America's Secret Recovery of Yamaxxxxa's Gold and then traveling to Europe to interview them--they are in self-imposed exile--for a DVD that was shown at one of my earlier international conferences. [My rendition of this review at Phi Beta Iota, the Public Intelligence Blog, has live links Amazon does not allow here.]

They are among the most serious and talented investigative journalists I know, easily ranking with John Pilger Freedom Next Time: Resisting the Empire, Robert KaplanThe Coming Anarchy: Shattering the Dreams of the Post Cold War; and my special favorite, Robert Young Pelton Robert Young Pelton's The World's Most Dangerous Places: 5th Edition (Robert Young Pelton the World's Most Dangerous Places).

This is a great read. I attended boarding school and later served as a Marine Corps infantry officer passing in and out of the Philippines; I have been inside Japanese tunnels and have a great regard for the Filipino people. Because the US has been so asidious in writing (and fabricating) the history of the Cold War, few know that the Huks were originally a loyal resistance to the Japanese occupiers--the US, despite its tolerance for out of control atrocity mongers like Landsdale, has managed to "occupy" with a softer touch, but one no less detrimental.

As a former spy--a recovering spy--for the Central Intelligence Agency I would certify that 90% of the CIA is good people trapped in a bad system with no blood on their hands. Our problem is the 10% that does renditions, tortures, helps train and arm those who would do genocide and atrocities (including the Israelis, who now teach us rather than learn from us).

RED SKY has no endnotes, but is based on solid evidence. [i provide others supporting references at Phi Beta Iota the Public Intelligence Blog, as live links within this review there.] I consider Gold Warriors (with its CD containing 60,000 pages of maps and supporting documentation) to be the better book, but for some readers, this book will be much more fun and memorable. Here are the highlights from this most truthful account

+ Landsdale was never in combat--he spent WWII in San Francisco writing propaganda for the OSS. + When Truman closed down the OSS (he later regretted every starting the CIA) OSS people were scattered around to hide them, Lansdale was sent to Manile to work a desk for Army G-2.

+ Landsdale's bright shining moment came when he recognized the value of a captured driver (Major Kojima Kashi) to General Yamaxxxxa, and bribed him to reveal treasure locations. That treasure became the basis for the USA's covert post-war Black Eagle and Golden Lily slush funds used to restore Nazis in Germany and fascists in Italy and Japan, and to do those things Congress would never agree to pay for.

+ Santa Romana, a Vatican agent and member of Opus Dei, was Landsdale's co-conspirator (fast forward to the Opus Dei penetration of the US Government today, every bit as good as the Mossad's sayonim and the Mormon network).

+ Landsdale--the model for the book The Ugly American and also featured in Edward Lansdale's Cold War (Culture, Politics, and the Cold War)--became a "big shot" in OSS-CIA circles because of this success at finding and secretly harvesting the Japanese thefts from China and all across Asia that were hidden in the Philippines when US dominance of the seas prevented onward passage to Japan.

+ Landsale--whom all the books I've seen describe as an opportunist and con artist at heart--saw that anti-communism was the wave of the future in Washington circles (even then CIA was busy importing 100 Nazis a year), and he came up with the idea of demonizing the Huk's, who were freedom fighters, as part of the "Communist Menace."

+ The book also covers the Chinese diaspora that the US Government has never understood and never taken seriously. The Chinese "High Cabal" is easily as powerful as the European "High Cabal," they just work more discreetly and make better use of local fronts.

+ Landsdale needed to invent evidence of Russian support for the Huks, so he focused on Russian exiles living in Manila or enroute through the Philippines to other locations including the US. + The heart of the story is how Landsale personally destroyed one innocent person and their family, ultimately making the person disappear after five years of surveillance, prison, and torture were brought to an end by a crusading attorney. Some sources have suggested that Landsdale ordered the murder of his trumped up Russian spy, who is believed to have been thrown from a helicopter into the South China Sea.

+ The book ends with Landsdale being rewarded by being sent to Viet-Nam to support Diem (a Catholic mandarin hated by the Buddhists, with a sister that makes Idi Amin look like a wimp) and I have seen other reports that suggest that Landsdale led an effort to plant bombs in the 1950's and early 1960's to achieve the US end of creating a local civil war that would demand US intervention.

There is also a happy ending, despite all the ills that befall the patsy, the source of much of the information in this book escapes and lived happily every after.

I still believe in America the Beautiful and the righteousness of The Average American: The Extraordinary Search for the Nation's Most Ordinary Citizen but I am disgusted and alienated by all that has been done "in our name" over the years, ultimately impoverishing the many to benefit the few. I earnestly believe that the public is a populist power that cannot be suppressed, and that information and communications technologies have changed the balance of power to favor the possibility of creating a prosperous world at peace.

This book is one of the many nails in the coffin of Cold War "irrational exhuberance" that has clearly been repeated in the failure to keep capitalism moral and the failure to keep government honest at home and abroad. We can do better.

Rather than provide links here, see the 98 categories of Reviews at Phi Beta Iota the Public Intelligence Blog.

Edited by Peter McGuire
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Thanks, Peter. Robert Steele (the reviewer you cited) is a champion of open intelligence replacing the Balkanized system in the States. I hope it's not already too late.

Great review by Robert Steele. Luckily I visited the Magellan Hotel in Cebu in April of 1993 just before the May 22, 1993 fire that destroyed it. There were a few books written with the Maggelan as a backdrop, weren't there? It seems that I read a novel before going to the Philippines in 1993 and was drawn to the Magellan.

Edited by Peter McGuire
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Thanks, Peter. Robert Steele (the reviewer you cited) is a champion of open intelligence replacing the Balkanized system in the States. I hope it's not already too late.

Great review by Robert Steele. Luckily I visited the Magellan Hotel in April of 1993 just before the May 22, 1993 fire that destroyed it. There were a few books written with the Maggelan as a backdrop, weren't there? It seems that I read a novel before going to the Philippines in 1993 and was drawn to the Magellan.

Sterling, I know I don't just speak for myself, in saying that, we all are very glad that you take the time to share your perceptions and knowledge of Far East intelligence history, here on the Forum, we're all the better for it.

Robert

Edited by Robert Howard
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Thanks, Peter. Robert Steele (the reviewer you cited) is a champion of open intelligence replacing the Balkanized system in the States. I hope it's not already too late.

Great review by Robert Steele. Luckily I visited the Magellan Hotel in Cebu in April of 1993 just before the May 22, 1993 fire that destroyed it. There were a few books written with the Maggelan as a backdrop, weren't there? It seems that I read a novel before going to the Philippines in 1993 and was drawn to the Magellan.

I think America has made the same mistake Magellan made.

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Thanks, Peter. Robert Steele (the reviewer you cited) is a champion of open intelligence replacing the Balkanized system in the States. I hope it's not already too late.

Great review by Robert Steele. Luckily I visited the Magellan Hotel in April of 1993 just before the May 22, 1993 fire that destroyed it. There were a few books written with the Maggelan as a backdrop, weren't there? It seems that I read a novel before going to the Philippines in 1993 and was drawn to the Magellan.

Sterling, I know I don't just speak for myself, in saying that, we all are very glad that you take the time to share your perceptions and knowledge of Far East intelligence history, here on the Forum, we're all the better for it.

Robert

John Simkin is a great man, and so are all his colleagues in this website, which has been a real feast for me with a hell of an ongoing conversation. Incidentally, the new edition of Lords of the Rim 2010 -- China's Renaissance, is dedicated to John, and France's General Henri Eyraud, for many years the French military attache in Beijing. If you read French, his book on China's reform and opening is superb. Thanks for allowing me to be a member.

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Well I cannot say that the famous Dealey Plaza photo has Lansdale in it, but it does have a strong resemblance to Lansdale (well not too strong but at least from the back view). Anyone ever find out who that was? I often wonder about what MacNamara may have known, if anything.

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There was one person I never got around to mentioning in all of the Philippine business, who has a very interesting background.

Doris Duke's father died when she was 12 years old. James Buchanan Duke, a tobacco and energy mogul, left his daughter around $100 million, which earned her the title "the richest girl in the world" and made her something of a national celebrity. Duke would spend the rest of her life enjoying a series of high-profile love affairs and dabbling in philanthropy and horticulture. Here are five things you might not have known about the famed heiress:

1. She Really Liked a Man in Uniform

Doris Duke apparently realized that if you're going to fall for a man in uniform, you might as well shoot for the top. That's why she had a high-profile affair with General George S. Patton. The two originally met during Hawaiian vacations; Duke even gave the decorated general some polo ponies as a gift. They later ran across each other in Russia when Duke was traveling as a correspondent for Hearst, and they became lovers. Duke later said that Patton's trademark knee-high boots were "a marvelous turn-on."

2. She Bailed Out Imelda Marcos

In 1988, exiled First Lady of the Philippines and shoe enthusiast Imelda Marcos ran afoul of the American justice system when she was arraigned on federal racketeering charges. According to prosecutors, Marcos and eight other defendants were involved in a fraud and embezzlement scheme that centered on hundreds of millions of dollars worth of Manhattan real estate transactions.

Although Marcos and her husband were allegedly worth billions at the time of their arrests, the authorities froze most of the couples' assets, which made posting Imelda's $5 million bail a bit tricky. That's where Duke came in. The heiress had visited the Philippines during the Marcos era and become quite chummy with the First Lady, so Duke rushed to put up her old pal's bond. She even floated Marcos cash to cover her legal fees.

While Duke was quite a philanthropist, she wasn't just giving money to the filthy rich Marcos. Duke amended her will to authorize her executors to recover all of the loans to Marcos once things settled down in the Philippines. [Pictured: Imelda Marcos, Doris Duke, and the 35-year-old woman she adopted. We'll get to her in a moment.]

3. The Government Penned Her Prenup

In 1947, Duke married Dominican playboy Porfirio Rubirosa, who was legendary in Europe for his sexual prowess. Duke allegedly paid Rubirosa's first wife a million dollars to leave him, and their romance quickly took off.

Apparently the rumors about Rubirosa's skills as a lover were true, but other members of Duke's circle were worried about other rumors surrounding the handsome Italian. There were persistent whispers that Rubirosa had worked as a political assassin for the Dominican government, and many were concerned that the playboy might take a crack at bumping off his wealthy wife.

The U.S. government was allegedly so concerned about Rubirosa making off with Duke's fabulous wealth that it decided to intervene to force the groom to sign a prenuptial agreement. The exact details of the story vary. Some versions have government agents drugging Rubirosa and coercing him into signing the prenup, while others have a sober Rubirosa fainting upon learning just how wealthy Duke was. In either event, Duke was probably glad the government interceded on her behalf; her union with Rubirosa only lasted a year.

4. She Adopted a 35-Year-Old Woman

When Duke was 27 years old, she delivered a premature baby daughter who died just 24 hours after being born. The baby's death profoundly affected Duke, and she even hired psychics to try to help her communicate with her lost child.

These tactics didn't seem to work until Duke was 73. When their mutual belly dancing instructor introduce Duke to 32-year-old Hare Krishna devotee Chandi Heffner in 1985, Duke decided that Heffner was the reincarnation of her lost baby daughter. The two women started out as friends, but Duke began lavishing increasingly more extravagant gifts on Heffner, including a 290-acre horse ranch in Hawaii. In 1989, Duke formalized the odd relationship by legally adopting the 35-year-old Heffner.

However, everything didn't turn out beautifully for the mother and her possibly reincarnated daughter. By 1991, the relationship had soured, and Duke negated the adoption of Heffner. Duke's will specifically instructed that her former adopted daughter should not receive any inheritance:

"I am extremely troubled by the realization that Chandi Heffner may use my 1988 adoption of her (when she was 35 years old) to attempt to benefit financially under the terms of trusts created by my father. After giving the matter prolonged and serious consideration, I am convinced that I should not have adopted Chandi Heffner.

"I have come to the realization that her primary motive was financial gain. I believe that, like me, my father would not have wanted her to have benefitted under the trusts which he created, and similarly, I do not wish her to benefit from my estate."

After suing Duke's estate three times following Duke's 1993 death, however, Heffner received a $65 million settlement.

5. She Took Care of Her Butler, Though

When Duke died in 1993, she left behind a $1.3 billion fortune, but she had no heirs. Instead, she left most of her cash to charity; her will named her butler, Irishman Bernard Lafferty, as the estate's sole executor. Lafferty received $500,000 a year for acting as the estate's executor and a $5 million lump sum bequest from Duke.

Duke leaving so much money to her butler raised a lot of eyebrows, and accusations started to fly that Lafferty and Duke's doctor had conspired to hasten the heiress' death. Other skeptics claimed that Lafferty had coerced a sick and confused old lady into leaving him a giant sum of money. The murmurs got so loud that the Los Angeles District Attorney's office investigated the allegations before ruling there was "no credible evidence" that any of them were true.

However, Lafferty wasn't the world's best executor. He allegedly racked up a seven-figure credit card bill buying luxury items for himself immediately following Duke's death, and he dropped the estate's money on things like building a shooting range and buying a pair of miniature horses. Shortly before his death in 1996, he agreed to give up the executor position in exchange for $500,000 a year for the rest of his life.

http://www.worldsstr...out-doris-duke/

Inquiry Ends on Death at Duke Estate

October 10, 1966

Newport, R.I. (UPI)

Police Tuesday labeled as "definitely an accident" the death of Eduardo Tirella, who was killed by a car operated by tobacco heiress Doris Duke.

Eduardo Tirella, 42, a movie set designer and Mrs. Duke's constant companion was killed when a station wagon operated by her luched forward and crushed him against the gates

of her Rough Point estate here

July 6, 1965

Playboy Rubirosa Dies When Car Rams Tree

In the late 1940s New York's high society followed the adventures of Porfirio Rubirosa, a Dominican who developed an international reputation as a playboy by romancing wealthy and famous women. His conquests included the tobacco heiress Doris Duke, the actress Zsa Zsa Gabor, followed years later by her sister Eva, and Barbara Hutton, granddaughter of the founder of Woolworth.

The mission of the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation

is to improve the quality of people's lives through

grants supporting the performing arts, environmental conservation, medical research and the prevention

of child abuse, and through preservation of the cultural and environmental legacy of Doris Duke's properties.

Established in 1996, the foundation supports four national grantmaking programs. It also supports three properties that were owned by Doris Duke in Hillsborough, New Jersey; Honolulu, Hawaii; and Newport, Rhode Island. The foundation is headquartered in New York and is governed by a board of 11 Trustees.

The DDCF's activities are guided by the will of Doris Duke, who endowed the foundation with financial assets that totaled approximately $1.5 billion as of December 31, 2009. The foundation regularly evaluates and modifies its allocation of resources from the endowment to support the programs and properties and to respond to fluctuations in portfolio returns.

The Programs

The foundation awarded its first grants in 1997. As of December 31, 2009, the foundation has approved approximately 1,061 grants totaling approximately $724 million to nonprofit organizations throughout the United States. Grants are awarded in four program areas:

* The Arts Program supports performing artists with the creation and public performance of their work.

* The Environment Program supports efforts to preserve wildlife in the United States.

* The Medical Research Program seeks to contribute to the prevention and cure of disease by supporting clinical research.

* The Child Abuse Prevention Program seeks to protect children from abuse and neglect in order to promote their healthy development.

The Properties

In her will, Doris Duke requested that several operating foundations manage the properties listed below. She also expressed her wishes that the properties be opened for public visitation and used for educational programs. The operating foundations receive funding from the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation.

* The Duke Farms Foundation manages a 2,700-acre property in Hillsborough, New Jersey, which is known as "Duke Farms."

* The Doris Duke Foundation for Islamic Art manages Doris Duke's home in Honolulu, Hawaii, which is known as "Shangri La."

* The Newport Restoration Foundation preserves historic houses in Newport, Rhode Island, and operates Doris Duke's home in Newport known as "Rough Point."

Robert: Doris Duke, was a close relative of Angier Biddle Duke, who was Chief of Protocol for the Kennedy White House....

For a closer look see the book Too Rich: The Family Secrets of Doris Duke author Pony Duke and Richard Thomas.

Pony Duke is the son of Angier Biddle Duke and cousin/godson of Doris Duke.

One of the stranger claims about the death of Doris Duke is that it possibly was a murder, there is a quote that "Bernard Lafferty had become the Rasputin of the court of Doris Duke."

It seems when she died, her body was quickly cremated, and consequently no autopsy was performed. Cremation ostensibly, was against her wishes to begin with.

I can't imagine that anyone thinks there was foul play, I mean we're only talking about a bazillion dollars.

Also See

Bibliofile: The Heiress, the Detective, Mom and the Fashion Hound by Marilyn Hudson

Orange Coast Magazine 1996

Ralph Fiennes played Rafferty in the movie, Bernard and Doris, it is a real piece of work......

Duke and James Copeland

Edited by Robert Howard
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Not to muddy waters - because I don't think it's the same man - but has anybody compared this photo to the famous "Lansdale passes the Three Tramps" photo?

I would like to be sure that the man in dark suit and pocket handkerchief is not the "Lansdale figure" seen from behind in the earlier shot - having done a double-take, turned around, and followed the cortege of "cops" and "tramps," to be captured frontally in this photo.

Is "Pocket Square Man" in any other photos that would distinguish him from "Lansdale seen from behind?"

Edited by David Andrews
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I would like to be sure that the man in dark suit and pocket handkerchief is not the "Lansdale figure" seen from behind in the earlier shot - having done a double-take, turned around, and followed the cortege of "cops" and "tramps," to be captured frontally in this photo.

Is "Pocket Square Man" in any other photos that would distinguish him from "Lansdale seen from behind?"

I believe someone here a few years ago identified what you refer to as a pocket handkerchief as a press credential or name tag or whatever they call it. The woman with her hand to her face also appears to be wearing one.

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Here is an interview General Lansdale gave for the series Vietnam: A Television History

Estrangement from the Kennedy Administration:

Part 4

Part 5

Lansdale in Vietnam:

The "ED HEADS" were all about winning the hearts and minds in Vietnam

Lansdale11a.jpg

BBC News: Saigon Songs

The campaign was run by Maj Gen Ed Lansdale of the US Army, who by all accounts was a most remarkable man...Maj Gen Lansdale's singers even included the country's prime minister, Air Marshal Nguyen Cao Ky, who by the sound of the tapes was probably a better airman than a vocalist. The concerts took place not only at Maj Gen Lansdale's villa, but in villages and army camps around the country.

...But of course the hearts and minds campaign failed.

Fearing that this might happen, Maj Gen Lansdale assembled the tapes and sent them to his country's leaders - Henry Kissinger, the Chiefs of Staff and President Lyndon Johnson - to try and give them a better idea of what this other war was like, and the need to resource it properly.

Two years before he died in 1987, Lansdale set out his views on the difference between conventional wars and people's wars, which he presciently insisted had to be fought by other means than firepower alone...

Finally, the famous photo taken by George Smith of the Fort Worth Star Telegram:

Lansdale9.jpg

Associated Forum Topics:

Lansdale in DP on 11/22/63?

The Ed Lansdale lookalike

Was Lansdale in Dealey Plaza?

[Photo Credits: 'Edward Lansdale's Cold War,' by Jonathan Nashel]

Zach

Edited by Zach Robertson
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