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Max Holland on Gus Russo's Brothers in Arms


John Simkin
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Gus Russo has just published his book, Brothers in Arms. Max Holland says on his website:

http://hnn.us/roundup/entries/58187.html

On October 28, Bloomsbury USA published Brothers in Arms, Gus Russo’s second book on the Kennedy assassination, co-authored with Stephen Molton. The book came well-blurbed, with Diane McWhorter, Joe Califano, and Daniel Schorr singing words of praise.

Bloomsbury’s press release boasted that Brothers in Arms contained “explosive new information” about the role of Castro’s Cuba in the assassination. One of the specific disclosures was advertised as coming from “deathbed interviews” of Marty Underwood, “one of LBJ’s closest confidantes, a man who also was in charge of Johnson’s international security arrangements.” At LBJ’s behest, Underwood allegedly went on a secret mission to Mexico City in 1968 to find out what the CIA really knew about Cuban involvement in JFK’s assassination. Underwood’s “revelations, supported by his contemporaneous notes, reveal a shocking truth that was too dangerous to be disclosed . . . until after his passing.”[1]

Next month, Washington Decoded will review Brothers in Arms in full, and examine all its allegations in light of the available evidence. This month is devoted solely to the backstory about Marty Underwood’s shocking truth.

If it weren’t so pathetic, the backstory might actually be amusing.

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Gus Russo has just published his book, Brothers in Arms. Max Holland says on his website:

http://hnn.us/roundup/entries/58187.html

On October 28, Bloomsbury USA published Brothers in Arms, Gus Russo's second book on the Kennedy assassination, co-authored with Stephen Molton. The book came well-blurbed, with Diane McWhorter, Joe Califano, and Daniel Schorr singing words of praise.

Bloomsbury's press release boasted that Brothers in Arms contained "explosive new information" about the role of Castro's Cuba in the assassination. One of the specific disclosures was advertised as coming from "deathbed interviews" of Marty Underwood, "one of LBJ's closest confidantes, a man who also was in charge of Johnson's international security arrangements." At LBJ's behest, Underwood allegedly went on a secret mission to Mexico City in 1968 to find out what the CIA really knew about Cuban involvement in JFK's assassination. Underwood's "revelations, supported by his contemporaneous notes, reveal a shocking truth that was too dangerous to be disclosed . . . until after his passing."[1]

Next month, Washington Decoded will review Brothers in Arms in full, and examine all its allegations in light of the available evidence. This month is devoted solely to the backstory about Marty Underwood's shocking truth.

If it weren't so pathetic, the backstory might actually be amusing.

Hey John,

Can you get Max, Gus and Rod McKenzie over to answer some questions too?

Then we can have a real book party.

Bill Kelly

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WHY does anyone care about what Max Holland or Gus Russo (the CIA calls me Gus) think?

Jack

We should care, Jack, because a Holland/Russo "feud" is designed to prompt observers to choose between liars and thus implicitly endorse one of their assassination-related lies.

This is an example of perception control: Limit possibilities, and the truth is eliminated from consideration.

This charade also serves to bolster Russo and his fabrications by allowing him to castigate a WC defender.

Sophisticated stuff. Let's talk about it further on the DPF.

Charles

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  • 2 weeks later...
WHY does anyone care about what Max Holland or Gus Russo (the CIA calls me Gus) think?

Jack

We should care, Jack, because a Holland/Russo "feud" is designed to prompt observers to choose between liars and thus implicitly endorse one of their assassination-related lies.

This is an example of perception control: Limit possibilities, and the truth is eliminated from consideration.

This charade also serves to bolster Russo and his fabrications by allowing him to castigate a WC defender.

Sophisticated stuff. Let's talk about it further on the DPF.

Charles

The Cuban Archives are also getting involved in this fray between proponents of two levels of the cover-story - the Cubans did it and Oswald did it because he was crazy.

Russo doesn't dispute the Warren Commission's contention that Oswald was the lone assassin, he just takes the bait on the pre-planned and laid out cover story, or rather he wants us to take the bait.

I've now got Brothers In Arms and am reading it faithfully. It has a lot of new, good stuff, but of course Russo twists it till you almost can't recognize it with his bizarre conclusions.

These guys are like lawyers representing their clients.

BK

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  • 2 weeks later...
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Gus Russo responds to Max Holland's critique on Dale Myers' JFKFiles blog, in the wittily titled post Holland-aise Sauce: More Grousing From the Sidelines.

http://jfkfiles.blogspot.com/2008/12/holla...using-from.html

http://hnn.us/roundup/entries/58187.html

Max Holland on Russo

http://www.washingtondecoded.com/

Max had me going there for a minute, but then I don't think Houston is 600 miles away from Dallas. In fact, without even looking at a map or checking, that must be more than twice as far as it really is. And while I don't know if Underwood made it back to Dallas to catch Air Force One, it was certainly possible, as I think Jack Valente and the Judge traveled quite a bit to get there. But Max's excessive exageration doesn't help his case here. - BK

Max: "According to this passage, Underwood was sound asleep in Houston’s Rice Hotel, 600 miles away, when the shots were fired in Dallas."

Mel Ayton on Russo

http://hnn.us/roundup/entries/58198.html

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