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Proof of Apollo continues to roll in


Evan Burton
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Guest Stephen Turner

Of course, the truth is that no matter how clear the images are the hoaxers will simply say that NASAs had four decades to plant it, indeed, according to the "backwards speech" thread the LMs were sent down with the original missions, just minus any Astronauts, where they mechanically grabed moon rocks, so thats that mystery explained then LOL.

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Ahem.

Photoshop.

(Grabs coat and runs off down to the pub).

:tomatoes

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  • 1 month later...

Fake Dutch 'Moon Rock' Revealed

A treasured piece at the Dutch national museum - a supposed moon rock from the first manned lunar landing - is nothing more than petrified wood, curators say.

It was given to former Prime Minister Willem Drees during a goodwill tour by the three Apollo-11 astronauts shortly after their moon mission in 1969.

When Mr Drees died, the rock went on display at the Amsterdam museum.

At one point it was insured for around $500,000 (£308,000), but tests have proved it was not the genuine article.

The Rijksmuseum, which is perhaps better known for paintings by artists such as Rembrandt, says it will keep the piece as a curiosity.

"It's a good story, with some questions that are still unanswered," Xandra van Gelder, who oversaw the investigation that proved the piece was a fake, was quoted as saying by the Associated Press news agency.

"We can laugh about it."

The "rock" had originally been been vetted through a phone call to Nasa, she added.

The US agency gave moon rocks to more than 100 countries following lunar missions in the 1970s.

US officials said they had no explanation for the Dutch discovery.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/8226075.stm

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Fake Dutch 'Moon Rock' Revealed

A treasured piece at the Dutch national museum - a supposed moon rock from the first manned lunar landing - is nothing more than petrified wood, curators say.

It was given to former Prime Minister Willem Drees during a goodwill tour by the three Apollo-11 astronauts shortly after their moon mission in 1969.

When Mr Drees died, the rock went on display at the Amsterdam museum.

At one point it was insured for around $500,000 (£308,000), but tests have proved it was not the genuine article.

The Rijksmuseum, which is perhaps better known for paintings by artists such as Rembrandt, says it will keep the piece as a curiosity.

"It's a good story, with some questions that are still unanswered," Xandra van Gelder, who oversaw the investigation that proved the piece was a fake, was quoted as saying by the Associated Press news agency.

"We can laugh about it."

The "rock" had originally been been vetted through a phone call to Nasa, she added.

The US agency gave moon rocks to more than 100 countries following lunar missions in the 1970s.

US officials said they had no explanation for the Dutch discovery.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/8226075.stm

The very article you quoted said "The US agency gave moon rocks to more than 100 countries following lunar missions in the 1970s". This on the other hand was given in 1969 (before samples were given out) and to a private citizen. It was also far bigger than any official sample given out, did not have a mount and the accompanying plaque did NOT say it was a Moon rock. Most importantly, it is obviously, to anybody familiar with rocks and/or petrified wood, NOT a Moon rock as was quickly found out when somebody with a bit of scientific background took a look at it. Seems more like a case of somebody who didn't know any better just assumed it was a Moon rock.

Edited by Matthew Lewis
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Seems more like a case of somebody who didn't know any better just assumed it was a Moon rock.

Right. The three Apollo 11 astronauts who presented it to the prime minister didn't know it was petrified wood. Or maybe they did know, and were simply classless jerks.

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Seems more like a case of somebody who didn't know any better just assumed it was a Moon rock.

Right. The three Apollo 11 astronauts who presented it to the prime minister didn't know it was petrified wood. Or maybe they did know, and were simply classless jerks.

Except it wasn't presented to the prime minister by the Apollo astronauts but by an ambassador and from what I've read it was more of a personal gift, not presented in any ceremony or presentation. Again, there is no mount, the plaque doesn't say it is a Moon rock, it is far bigger than any other sample given out and it was a full year before any samples were given out. Again, seems more like a case of somebody who didn't know any better just assumed it was a Moon rock.

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Except it wasn't presented to the prime minister by the Apollo astronauts but by an ambassador and from what I've read it was more of a personal gift, not presented in any ceremony or presentation.

You obviously know more about the story than I do. The article says the item was given to the prime minister during a goodwill tour by the astronauts. If that doesn't imply that the astronauts gave it to him, I don't know what does.

Also note that NASA reportedly confirmed that it was a moon rock. Lots of practical jokers around that place.

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