Jump to content
The Education Forum

Air Force One Radio Transmissions


William Kelly
 Share

Recommended Posts

But we're not considering using the scope. With the scope, because of the narrowness of the window height, for the scope to function that then reduces the window, which increases the necessity for movement. Besides the scope seems to have been a bit dodgy.

So I understand then that the up/down factor in shooting is negligible in this instance? The downgrade of the shot itself would have been about 18 degrees?

You're welcome. Thank you.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Replies 168
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Yeah, somwthing also covering everything from interior ballistics to exterior ballistics to wound ballistics.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yeah, somwthing also covering everything from interior ballistics to exterior ballistics to wound ballistics.

Mr. Dolva,

I will begin a thread entitled "ballistics" we can go from there.

Again my apologies to Mr. Kelly as I had no intention of distraction.

Mike

Hey Mike, I started the thread and asked you the questions that started the diversion.

Thanks for going to a new thead on the subject of ballistics, as I think it is extremely important and not fully understood.

Your imput much appreciated.

BK

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yeah, somwthing also covering everything from interior ballistics to exterior ballistics to wound ballistics.

Mr. Dolva,

I will begin a thread entitled "ballistics" we can go from there.

Again my apologies to Mr. Kelly as I had no intention of distraction.

Mike

Hey Mike, I started the thread and asked you the questions that started the diversion.

Thanks for going to a new thead on the subject of ballistics, as I think it is extremely important and not fully understood.

Your imput much appreciated.

BK

Mr. Kelly,

Thank You Sir. Yes I do believe understanding the ballistics is crucial.

If there is anything I can ever help you with I remain at your service.

Best Sir,

Mike

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks, Bill. I knew I'd read somewhere that Bundy himself told them there was no conspiracy.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 months later...
Bill Kelly... One last noticeable exchange worth reporting is from “Wing” (Brigadier General Godfrey McHugh, USAF, President Kennedy’s Air Force Aide) to “Slugger”(Capt. Cecil Stoughton, USAF, White House photographer who photographed both the swearing-in of LBJ onboard Air Force One in Dallas, and the onloading of JFK’s casket at Love Field):

Wing asks that Crown relay to Slugger that he must meet the aircraft as soon as possible after arrival Andrews, and that if he cannot do this, he is to see Wing as soon as possible after arrival, or contact him in any way feasible. The urgency and importance of this matter to Wing is very clear from his tone of voice. Later, Crown informs Wing that Slugger remained on the ground in Dallas. One of the many conversations not on the

If Stoughton remained in Dallas, how he could make these photos?

KK

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Bill Kelly... One last noticeable exchange worth reporting is from "Wing" (Brigadier General Godfrey McHugh, USAF, President Kennedy's Air Force Aide) to "Slugger"(Capt. Cecil Stoughton, USAF, White House photographer who photographed both the swearing-in of LBJ onboard Air Force One in Dallas, and the onloading of JFK's casket at Love Field):

Wing asks that Crown relay to Slugger that he must meet the aircraft as soon as possible after arrival Andrews, and that if he cannot do this, he is to see Wing as soon as possible after arrival, or contact him in any way feasible. The urgency and importance of this matter to Wing is very clear from his tone of voice. Later, Crown informs Wing that Slugger remained on the ground in Dallas. One of the many conversations not on the

If Stoughton remained in Dallas, how he could make these photos?

KK

Good question Karl.

Stoughton took the swearing in photos and he got off the AF1 after taking them.

Since AF2 landed at Andrews after AF1, he couldn't have taken these photos by returning on a later plane.

What is the answer?

I would have to say that the Andrews photos are mislabeled as Stoughtons when they were probably taken by someone else - Kundson? -

http://www.americanh...988_7_142.shtml

Trask: The ceremony was over within half a minute. The President ordered Air Force One back to Washington, and those remaining in Dallas left the plane, Stoughton among them. He would stay to have his unprocessed film developed and sent out via the wire services. When Kilduff handed Stoughton the Dictabelt recording of the oath of office, the captain felt that he had been made totally responsible for history’s record of this momentous event. The visible continuity of the Republic had been accomplished. The government continued. And Stoughton was carrying the proof.

No one was allowed to enter or leave the airstrip until Air Force One took off. Just about the time the plane became airborne at 2:47 P.M., a press bus from Parkland arrived on the scene. The pool reporter Sid Davis, who had been aboard during the swearing-in, described the event to the other reporters who gathered around him. A nickel was flipped to see which bureau would process the undeveloped pictures. AP won the toss. After a dash to the Dallas Morning News Building, where the AP office was located, the film was handed over to a technician. Stoughton went into the darkroom with him.

BK

Edited by William Kelly
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Bill Kelly... One last noticeable exchange worth reporting is from "Wing" (Brigadier General Godfrey McHugh, USAF, President Kennedy's Air Force Aide) to "Slugger"(Capt. Cecil Stoughton, USAF, White House photographer who photographed both the swearing-in of LBJ onboard Air Force One in Dallas, and the onloading of JFK's casket at Love Field):

Wing asks that Crown relay to Slugger that he must meet the aircraft as soon as possible after arrival Andrews, and that if he cannot do this, he is to see Wing as soon as possible after arrival, or contact him in any way feasible. The urgency and importance of this matter to Wing is very clear from his tone of voice. Later, Crown informs Wing that Slugger remained on the ground in Dallas. One of the many conversations not on the

If Stoughton remained in Dallas, how he could make these photos?

KK

Good question Karl.

Stoughton took the swearing in photos and he got off the AF1 after taking them.

Since AF2 landed at Andrews after AF1, he couldn't have taken these photos by returning on a later plane.

What is the answer?

I would have to say that the Andrews photos are mislabeled as Stoughtons when they were probably taken by someone else - Kundson? -

http://www.americanh...988_7_142.shtml

Trask: The ceremony was over within half a minute. The President ordered Air Force One back to Washington, and those remaining in Dallas left the plane, Stoughton among them. He would stay to have his unprocessed film developed and sent out via the wire services. When Kilduff handed Stoughton the Dictabelt recording of the oath of office, the captain felt that he had been made totally responsible for history’s record of this momentous event. The visible continuity of the Republic had been accomplished. The government continued. And Stoughton was carrying the proof.

No one was allowed to enter or leave the airstrip until Air Force One took off. Just about the time the plane became airborne at 2:47 P.M., a press bus from Parkland arrived on the scene. The pool reporter Sid Davis, who had been aboard during the swearing-in, described the event to the other reporters who gathered around him. A nickel was flipped to see which bureau would process the undeveloped pictures. AP won the toss. After a dash to the Dallas Morning News Building, where the AP office was located, the film was handed over to a technician. Stoughton went into the darkroom with him...

BK

I ve just read the same article.

There are some oddity's in Stoughtons Story... quote americanheritage:

The next few days blur in Stoughton’s memory.(sic) “I was going all day Friday, Friday night, and shooting pictures (KK: of what?) at four o’clock in the morning.(KK. Where...at Dallas or Washington...?) I went back home, changed clothes, and went back to the White House (Aha, Washington...not a single word about the way he get from Dallas to Washington, when, on which plane etc...) to cover Johnson’s official meetings.

Close quote...

KK

Edited by Karl Kinaski
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 weeks later...
Bill Kelly... One last noticeable exchange worth reporting is from "Wing" (Brigadier General Godfrey McHugh, USAF, President Kennedy's Air Force Aide) to "Slugger"(Capt. Cecil Stoughton, USAF, White House photographer who photographed both the swearing-in of LBJ onboard Air Force One in Dallas, and the onloading of JFK's casket at Love Field):

Wing asks that Crown relay to Slugger that he must meet the aircraft as soon as possible after arrival Andrews, and that if he cannot do this, he is to see Wing as soon as possible after arrival, or contact him in any way feasible. The urgency and importance of this matter to Wing is very clear from his tone of voice. Later, Crown informs Wing that Slugger remained on the ground in Dallas. One of the many conversations not on the

If Stoughton remained in Dallas, how he could make these photos?

KK

Good question Karl.

Stoughton took the swearing in photos and he got off the AF1 after taking them.

Since AF2 landed at Andrews after AF1, he couldn't have taken these photos by returning on a later plane.

What is the answer?

I would have to say that the Andrews photos are mislabeled as Stoughtons when they were probably taken by someone else - Kundson? -

http://www.americanh...988_7_142.shtml

Trask: The ceremony was over within half a minute. The President ordered Air Force One back to Washington, and those remaining in Dallas left the plane, Stoughton among them. He would stay to have his unprocessed film developed and sent out via the wire services. When Kilduff handed Stoughton the Dictabelt recording of the oath of office, the captain felt that he had been made totally responsible for history’s record of this momentous event. The visible continuity of the Republic had been accomplished. The government continued. And Stoughton was carrying the proof.

No one was allowed to enter or leave the airstrip until Air Force One took off. Just about the time the plane became airborne at 2:47 P.M., a press bus from Parkland arrived on the scene. The pool reporter Sid Davis, who had been aboard during the swearing-in, described the event to the other reporters who gathered around him. A nickel was flipped to see which bureau would process the undeveloped pictures. AP won the toss. After a dash to the Dallas Morning News Building, where the AP office was located, the film was handed over to a technician. Stoughton went into the darkroom with him...

BK

I ve just read the same article.

There are some oddity's in Stoughtons Story... quote americanheritage:

The next few days blur in Stoughton’s memory.(sic) “I was going all day Friday, Friday night, and shooting pictures (KK: of what?) at four o’clock in the morning.(KK. Where...at Dallas or Washington...?) I went back home, changed clothes, and went back to the White House (Aha, Washington...not a single word about the way he get from Dallas to Washington, when, on which plane etc...) to cover Johnson’s official meetings.

Close quote...

KK

Has this issue been resolved?

The photos of AF1 at Andrews must have been taken by someone else

and they are misidentified.

There might be an answer in the book Stoughton wrote with Cifton.

Trask also follows three photographers in a book he wrote and one of them

might be Stoughton, which would have an answer.

Trask would also know.

Let's get an answer to this very answerable question.

BK

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 months later...
Bill Kelly... One last noticeable exchange worth reporting is from "Wing" (Brigadier General Godfrey McHugh, USAF, President Kennedy's Air Force Aide) to "Slugger"(Capt. Cecil Stoughton, USAF, White House photographer who photographed both the swearing-in of LBJ onboard Air Force One in Dallas, and the onloading of JFK's casket at Love Field):

Wing asks that Crown relay to Slugger that he must meet the aircraft as soon as possible after arrival Andrews, and that if he cannot do this, he is to see Wing as soon as possible after arrival, or contact him in any way feasible. The urgency and importance of this matter to Wing is very clear from his tone of voice. Later, Crown informs Wing that Slugger remained on the ground in Dallas. One of the many conversations not on the

If Stoughton remained in Dallas, how he could make these photos?

KK

Good question Karl.

Stoughton took the swearing in photos and he got off the AF1 after taking them.

Since AF2 landed at Andrews after AF1, he couldn't have taken these photos by returning on a later plane.

What is the answer?

I would have to say that the Andrews photos are mislabeled as Stoughtons when they were probably taken by someone else - Kundson? -

http://www.americanh...988_7_142.shtml

Trask: The ceremony was over within half a minute. The President ordered Air Force One back to Washington, and those remaining in Dallas left the plane, Stoughton among them. He would stay to have his unprocessed film developed and sent out via the wire services. When Kilduff handed Stoughton the Dictabelt recording of the oath of office, the captain felt that he had been made totally responsible for history's record of this momentous event. The visible continuity of the Republic had been accomplished. The government continued. And Stoughton was carrying the proof.

No one was allowed to enter or leave the airstrip until Air Force One took off. Just about the time the plane became airborne at 2:47 P.M., a press bus from Parkland arrived on the scene. The pool reporter Sid Davis, who had been aboard during the swearing-in, described the event to the other reporters who gathered around him. A nickel was flipped to see which bureau would process the undeveloped pictures. AP won the toss. After a dash to the Dallas Morning News Building, where the AP office was located, the film was handed over to a technician. Stoughton went into the darkroom with him...

BK

I ve just read the same article.

There are some oddity's in Stoughtons Story... quote americanheritage:

The next few days blur in Stoughton's memory.(sic) "I was going all day Friday, Friday night, and shooting pictures (KK: of what?) at four o'clock in the morning.(KK. Where...at Dallas or Washington...?) I went back home, changed clothes, and went back to the White House (Aha, Washington...not a single word about the way he get from Dallas to Washington, when, on which plane etc...) to cover Johnson's official meetings.

Close quote...

KK

Has this issue been resolved?

The photos of AF1 at Andrews must have been taken by someone else

and they are misidentified.

There might be an answer in the book Stoughton wrote with Cifton.

Trask also follows three photographers in a book he wrote and one of them

might be Stoughton, which would have an answer.

Trask would also know.

Let's get an answer to this very answerable question.

BK

Does anyone have a contact number for Trask to ask him about who took the photos of AF1 at Andrews that are wrongfully attributed to Soughton?

Or does anyone have the book Stoughton wrote with Clifton?

I know David Von Pain wrote a review of it.

David, you still with us?

BK

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The ceremony was over within half a minute. The President ordered Air Force One back to Washington, and those remaining in Dallas left the plane, Stoughton among them. He would stay to have his unprocessed film developed and sent out via the wire services. When Kilduff handed Stoughton the Dictabelt recording of the oath of office, the captain felt that he had been made totally responsible for history's record of this momentous event. The visible continuity of the Republic had been accomplished. The government continued. And Stoughton was carrying the proof.

For the best vantage in the cramped cabin, Stoughton climbed onto a sofa near the rear.No one was allowed to enter or leave the airstrip until Air Force One took off. Just about the time the plane became airborne at 2:47 P.M., a press bus from Parkland arrived on the scene. The pool reporter Sid Davis, who had been aboard during the swearing-in, described the event to the other reporters who gathered around him. A nickel was flipped to see which bureau would process the undeveloped pictures. AP won the toss. After a dash to the Dallas Morning News Building, where the AP office was located, the film was handed over to a technician. Stoughton went into the darkroom with him. "Even though there was nothing 1 could do, 1 just wanted to be there when it came out. And when he held it up to the light, I could see some images, and then I breathed. I was turning blue up to that point."

One of the four Hasselblad prints of the oath-taking was chosen as the picture to send over the wire. It was agreed that the photo would not be sent out until a duplicate copy had been delivered to UPl for its distribution. Both wire services gave Capt. Cecil Stoughton photo credit, and his picture was rapidly reproduced in newspapers and shown on television around the world.

http://www.americanh...988_7_142.shtml

david's review scroll downhttp://www.amazon.co...r/dp/0393086828

Edited by Bernice Moore
Link to comment
Share on other sites

The Memories--JFK, 1961-1963, of Cecil Stoughton, the President's Photographer, and Major General Chester V. Clifton, the President's Military Aide (Hardcover) If you're looking for some splendid (and rare) photographs of President John F. Kennedy and family, then this richly-detailed book should certainly be given due consideration.

"The Memories -- JFK -- 1961-1963" is a 200-page hardcover volume that is loaded with top-quality images of JFK, the First Lady (Jacqueline Kennedy), and the two young Kennedy children (John Jr. and Caroline). Every picture in this publication (save one) was taken by official White House photographer Cecil Stoughton, who snapped hundreds (if not thousands) of shots of the good-looking First Family during the "Camelot" years, which spanned precisely 1,037 days, beginning with President Kennedy's memorable inauguration on the snowy Washington afternoon of January 20, 1961 .... and ending tragically at just about the same time of day (noontime) nearly three years later, on November 22, 1963, when JFK was shot and killed in an assassination attempt while riding in a motorcade through the crowded city streets of Dallas, Texas.

But those 1,037 days of JFK's truncated Presidential term still provided Mr. Stoughton many opportunities to keep his camera's shutter busy. And a great number of those pics are presented in this volume (some in color).

I mentioned that just one photo in the book was not taken by Stoughton -- that one being a shot of Stoughton himself, snapped by 2-year-old John Kennedy Jr. (pretty good pic, too, by the amateur Kennedy photog).

In addition to Mr. Stoughton's superb camera work and heartfelt captions and recollections of being in the Kennedy "inner circle", this book also contains the remembrances of President Kennedy's military aide, Major General Chester V. Clifton. The book is narrated by "Time-Life" correspondent Hugh Sidey, who was a close friend of the Kennedys.

Among the many photos enriching these pages are some very rarely-published images of the "family living quarters" on the second floor of the White House. There's also a charming two-page photo spread showing Jackie (and offspring) riding in a small horse-drawn sleigh on the White House lawn. That exquisite photo would make an ideal Christmas postcard, especially if a color version of the photo exists, which I am unsure of. It's printed in black-and-white here.

The cover photo used for the hardback edition of this title -- showing a very relaxed-looking President Kennedy, wife Jackie, and their two children -- I have heard was one of Jacqueline Kennedy's favorite pictures ever taken of the First Family by Mr. Stoughton. (It's one of my personal favorites, too.) That's a cropped version of that photo on the cover; but the book also includes a full-sized (and full-page) version, also in color, which occupies all of Page #190.

In 1980, a paperback re-issue edition was released, with a different cover image. The softcover version depicts JFK and brother Robert Kennedy on the front cover.

The hardcover edition's first printing was in 1973, coinciding with the tenth anniversary date of JFK's assassination. This large book, published by W.W. Norton & Co. of New York, has a "coffee table" quality to it, with high quality paper stock used for its 200 pages.

I've owned this book for many years now, and hadn't re-visited its contents for quite some time until just recently. Upon re-examining these pages, the obvious devotion and fondness that Mr. Stoughton, Mr. Clifton, and Mr. Sidey had for John Kennedy and the First Family during those magical days in the early 1960s becomes readily apparent via the stellar photographs and sincere text and captions that adorn each page. I found myself enjoying this material just as much as I had years ago. It was like seeing it for the very first time.

This is a very "personal" book about the Kennedys. There are no "conspiracy theories" espoused here, and no talk of JFK's political enemies. Instead, what we get are the firsthand reflections of three of Jack Kennedy's friends, via a brief amount of text and lots and lots of captivating photographic images.

The grace, elegance, sophistication, style, and humor of the Kennedy White House years are vividly realized and illustrated in this sleek and well-done publication.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Please sign in to comment

You will be able to leave a comment after signing in



Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...