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Australian Federal election


Evan Burton
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And a welcome solid rejection of John Costellas Climate Skeptics

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''It's time ... for us to head off in search of a wee nightcap and a chance to digest what just happened. The only thing that seems to be clear at this stage is that nothing much will be clear for some time. We'll be back for more at 9am tomorrow; until then you can keep up to date on ABC News 24 and ABC News Online. For now it's goodnight from us at Election Live - thanks for your comments and tweets this evening, and for sharing one of the most intriguing and confounding election nights for decades.''

http://abc.com.au/el...s/federal/2010/

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It's looking like a hung parliament, with crucial seats going to be decided by postal votes.

That's going to be interesting, because we don't know if they will reflect the pattern we see now, or the pattern of the last few weeks before the election.

This election could be decided by the Governor-General!

Personally, I hope the Coalition get across the line. I dislike Abbott but won't risk Labor on things like Defence. If Labor get back in, we'll be having our internet censored.

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It'll be interesting. I wouldn't be surprised if it's a shortlived government. At least the progressives have the senate, and the close cut in the Reps will make passage of anti labor/union laws more difficult.

The internet? It's already censored, it's been gradually degrading for a decade or more as commercialism sets in.

Defence? It took a Labor gov to bring the boys home from Viet Nam, and it took a gov gen with the L/NCP and the CIA to get rid of Labour.

I go with the party most likely to be able to protect the rights of ordinary people. The conservatives have no interest in that, only money for a few at whatever human cost.

Perhaps there will be enough impetus to become a Republic with a different voting regime that will more truly reflect the wishes of voters.

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You want a republic? I haven't seen the need, myself, though I can't say I have really studied the issues. I'm not a monarchist but rather happy with the status quo. Still, if the majority want it I can't say I'm opposed to the idea.

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I'm for voting reform. Strongly anti monarchist. Anything to break the influence of foreign interests. It doesn't necessarily have to be a Republic but that is the one proposal that is mostly floated as an alternative. There are others that I personally favour but see no way as ever becoming a reality. Severing any manarchical influences, getting rid of any loop holes that would allow another Dismissal will require an overhaul of some kind.

The vote above the line is a farce. It's the best way to lose your vote and it's the most likely way of voting by voters ignorant of the possible consequences. A left vote can end up drifting to the right. The primary voting intentions are vulnerable to the preferential system as it stands. Some change is needed.

A hung parliament could be enough to advance the recognition of a need for change.

Anyway, I don't really think the result will be totally hung. The progressives have the Senate, and consider the three undecided plus the one Green rep a progressive House of Reps is still on the cards imo. Whoever gets the HoR will have difficulties anyway, but the one with the Senate as well will more likely to govern effectively. This is not the conservatives outcome and never can be now.

edit typo. edit

Edited by John Dolva
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The new green MP has stated categorically he will not help the coalition. ie the fgures, if one factors in the near decided undecided 3 could very well see a progressive government.

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Boothby is now considered a fourth undecided with a surge to Labor due to green pref flows.

edit edit

Edited by John Dolva
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The count is on again.

The shifts continue with new undecideds and a drop in conservative wins and rise for Labor. Add the green MP and Labor is ahead. This is a weird election.

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Looks like the Eden-Monaro factor might prevail yet again. :)

It's like a roller coaster ride to the finish. Those non aussies who are interested in politics can understand the tenseness of the situation.

Edited by John Dolva
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It is so undecided!

I think we can say one thing: no matter which party comes out as the winner, about half the country will be unhappy with the result.

This is going to be a very interesting time in Australian politics!

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I was taking a break from as much of it as possible today after chatting with my daughter about this. She is heavily donkey on this one. I think Labor caught a large part of the media by surprise. Basically they introduced a flux to the proceedings which has led and willl lead to the future/present events

I can certainly see why you say so. It was a line heavily pushed by the opposition. However, I think the Labor party has run a very smart campaign. Kevin was coming up to a fairly serious operation. If he had been prime minister during this time it could have been a disastrous situation. To formalise a shift in leadership, which woukd have defaulted anyway, the Labor party made a risky preemptive strike. They then forced the conservatives to the right and the greens stepped in to be the alternative. A vote for the greens becomes a vote for Labor. In the leadup to the spill Kevin made a very strong pro labour speech. After recovery he came out batting for Julia. A broad coalition had formed and I think they caught the conservtives by surprise. The fiberals mistake was that it took them too long to realise what was going on.

edit : typo/s

Edited by John Dolva
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If I remember correctly Hasluck has been a core Labour seat which has seen a steady shift in demographics.

If I remember correctly then it's important to ralise that the so close edged election can depend on a so close to the edge electorate.

If I find time I'd look into the history of Hasluck and where it stood during the gerrymander years and the transition after the arch secessionist/segregationist Charlie Court..

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