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Sgt. Jack Dunlap


William Kelly
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DUNLAP, Jack E., E6, Arlington Cemetery - Facilities Engineer Section, Det 4, 58. (1928-July 1963)

Jack Edward Dunlap

SFC E6, Facilities Engineer Section, TUSLOG Det 4, 1958

American Spy for Soviets

(1928 - 1963)

I was assigned to Fort Meade with duty as the NCOIC of the Senior Cryptologic Course (CY-155) and remember reading about Sgt Dunlap. I never met the man who I believe worked in "C" Branch, but I'm probably mistaken. The one thing that sticks in my memory was that he owned a large boat and several expensive automobiles- - -gH. Does anyone, other than Jim Baker, remember this Jack Edward Dunlap at SINOP in 1958? If so, I'd appreciate hearing from you so that the rest of the story can be told.

JIM BAKER'S SINOP REMEMBRANCES

The year (1958) I was on The Hill was definitely a watershed concerning the post. There was a constant round of construction of barracks, additions to the ELINT and COMINT facilities, upgrades to the power, etc. Power was supplied by diesel generators that were increased in size practically monthly. Because of the mission, it was critical to have an uninterrupted source of power. Commercial power from Sinop was nowhere near satisfactory, so we generated our own. All of the construction meant a large force of Turkish workers who were mostly locals hired by the company that had the contract for all of the renovation and new construction.

THE CONSTRUCTION FOREMAN AT SINOP WAS A FOREIGN INTELLIGENCE AGENT

One of the foremen, if not the main boss, of these workers was a blond-haired Eastern European. Because his physical appearance was so much different than the Turks, he certainly stood out. I learned much later, back in the States, that he was a Hungarian Intelligence agent who was assigned to learn about the mission at Sinop.

JIM BAKER'S SINOP FRIENDSHIP WITH JACK DUNLAP

Another person assigned as a facilities engineer was SFC Jack Edward Dunlap whose background was in the Airborne Infantry. Sinop was his first ASA assignment and, following his clearance coming through, he was brought to operations and thoroughly briefed on our mission. The rationale was that knowledge of the mission would impress upon him the importance of uninterrupted power. I became good friends with him and our friendship continued after we both left Sinop and were reassigned to Ft. Meade, with duty at NSA. Since he had no operational background, his initial assignment at NSA was as driver to the NSA Chief-of-Staff (the position would later be Deputy Director for Operations [DDO] ), MG Garrison B.Coverdale, [born 12 July 1905 and died 8 June 1988]. Dunlap continued in that assignment until General Coverdale left NSA, and, at the General's request was given an assignment in an operational position. This was some two years later, in 1960, and I left Ft. Meade for a three year tour in Germany. In 1963 I was back at NSA, and we resumed our acquaintance, but I had married in the meantime, so we weren't as close. In the summer of 1963, he received another ASA assignment, but decided to quit the Army after 11 years active duty and seek employment at NSA. During the routine polygraph examination, several discrepancies were noted and the FBI was called. I remember in July of 1963, a research analyst at NSA named Victor Hamilton turned up in Moscow and announced that he was defecting. One day after Hamilton defection to Moscow, my former Sinop friend, Jack E. Dunlap, was found dead of carbon monoxide poisoning - an apparent suicide in the Glen Burnie area where he resided. I t is quite possible that Hamilton's defection was brought about with his knowing that Dunlap had flunked the polygraph and was afraid that he might be next to be found out and wanted a safe place to hide from prosecution. About three years earlier two other former NSA employees, Bernon F. Mitchell and William H. Martin [both homosexuals] had defected to the Soviet Union. I've heard that Jack Dunlap was buried with honors at Arlington National Cemetery. and read that about a month later, Dunlap's wife, Diane, found sealed packets of classified documents in the attic of their house, and it was then learned that Dunlap was a Soviet agent and that he had been providing the Soviets with information for over two years. I believe that Jack Dunlap was targeted and recruited into spying for the KGB while in Sinop and working daily with the construction foreman above mentioned and not after he was assigned to NSA. In the end, he committed suicide. All of this is, of course, another story, but I wanted to mention it to give some idea of the great, worldwide interest in the mission at Sinop in the 50's.

HERE'S AN ARTICLE ON JACK DUNLAP USING SEARCH ENGINE GOOGLE.COM

One of America's most secret organizations the NSA was thought to be impenetrable by foreign agents. Its security was said to be ironclad, its tight-lipped officials unapproachable. The KGB had for some time targeted the NSA but found no way to obtain its secrets until it discovered Sergeant Jack Dunlap, a beer-drinking clerk-messenger with five children, a tired wife and mounting bills.

Louisiana-born Jack Dunlap was a career Army man. He enlisted in the U.S. Army in 1952 and served with distinction in Korea. Remaining in the service, Dunlap rose to the rank of sergeant and was assigned to the NSA in 1958. He was given top secret messages to carry to NSA officials before they had been put into code. Moreover, Dunlap was given a top-secret clearance to view these "raw" unencoded messages.

Somehow learning of Dunlap's sensitive position. a KGB agent approached the sergeant in 1958, bluntly telling him that he would be paid handsomely for the contents of the pouches he was carrying. Dunlap did not hesitate and began selling the Russians copies of all the documents he carried about. His method was reportedly simple. Before delivering the documents, he slipped them under his shirt, drove to a rendezvous in Washington, D.C., had his contact make copies or photograph them, then returned them to the pouch and went on to make his delivery.

By June of 1960, he bought two Cadillacs and a Jaguar. Next, Dunlap acquired a statuesque blonde mistress, paying her expenses. It was later estimated that Dunlap was receiving from the Soviets between $40,000 and $50,000 a year. When neighbors asked about his new riches, Dunlap said that he had inherited a plantation in Louisiana.

NSA security paid no attention to Dunlap's new lifestyle. The spy brought attention to himself in 1963. He was about to be transferred to another post, which would cut off his access to documents. To continue making money from the Soviets, Dunlap believed that he could stay on at NSA by simply not re-enlisting when his tour of duty expired. He would then go to work for the agency as a civilian.

After being mustered out, Dunlap applied for work at NSA as a civilian. As such, he required a new clearance and, unlike the military working for NSA, he was compelled to take a lie detector test. He was given a polygraph test, which he failed. Dunlap learned that NSA and Army intelligence were both looking deeply into his background.

Dunlap fearing exposure, opted for suicide. The nature of Dunlap's death did not deter the Army from burying him with honors at Arlington National Cemetery. Then the spy's wife, Diane Dunlap, discovered a large number of classified documents in their home and turned these over to NSA which then pieced together Dunlap's traitorous activities, although it was never learned exactly how many documents Dunlap had turned over to the Russians, a vexing and costly problem for America's most secret organization.

THE SPY WARS by Edward Jay Epstein, New York Times Magazine, September 28, 1980

The primary task of any clandestine intelligence service... is to establish moles within the enemy's inner sanctum who are in a position to warn changes in its plans and intentions. "No intelligence can function unless it has secret sources. The clandestine service specializes in the spotting, compromising, recruiting and handling of moles on a regular basis. This is called Human intelligence, or simply, HUMINT. Within the Intelligence community, this question has been the center of a bitter and destructive debate that has persisted unresolved for many years. Most of these agents, according to their public admissions, were induced to work for the KGB by financial rewards or sexual blackmail rather than an ideological sympathy with Communism..... During the Cold War, there were dozens of important spy cases: Sgts. Jack Dunlap, William Martin and Bernon Mitchell at NSA, etc..... Our .... Intelligence community... watch for spies from other nations.....They usually do a very professional job. Although sometimes they really "drop the ball," as in the case of Sergeant Jack Dunlap, who drove his "KGB money" sports car to work - to the NSA HQ parking lot - every day for weeks! [Flash: Strikingly similar to the last-breaking, but worse, Ames/CIA case.]

Behind a ring of three barbed-wire electrified fences at Fort Meade, Md., is the headquarters of America's most secretive intelligence service the National Security Agency (NSA.). Even though it has more employees and a larger budget than any other American intelligence including the CIA. Even though its very existence had been classified a secret in the mid 1950s, such secrecy is considered necessary because it is responsible for protecting the security of the channels through which the leaders Of the United States Government, military forces and intelligence services communicate with one another. In most cases, the NSA designs the ciphers, encoding machines and protected lines through which the nation's most closely guarded secrets are transmitted . Any breach of this system can have disastrous consequences.

Aside from protecting the nation's secret communications, the NSA intercepts and deciphers the secrets of foreign governments. Such-signal intelligence includes intercepts of telephone and radio signals, telemetry from missiles and electrical impulses from radar and sonar. Vast quantities of information about the testing, capabilities and deployment of Soviet weaponry are derived from the NSA's electronic intelligence, or ELINT. Information about Soviet intentions comes from its code and cipher operations, which is known as Communications intelligence, or COMINT.

Despite its aura of secrecy, NSA has had multiple penetrations by Soviet intelligence. On July 22, 1963, Victor Norris Hamilton, a Syrian-born research analyst at NSA headquarters, turned up in Moscow and announced that he was defecting. He had been presumably an agent of the KGB In Moscow, he joined two other former NSA employees, Bernon F- Mitchell and William H Martin, who had defected to the Soviet Union three years earlier. While working as KGB moles at NSA, they had provided the Soviet Union with information about the technical capabilities and locations of the super secret sensors that the NSA had employed against it, and also with data about the NSA's codes and breaking techniques.

One day after Hamilton defected from the NSA, Jack E. Dunlap, an employee of the NSA since 1958, was found dead of carbon monoxide poisoning - an apparent suicide. One month later, when Dunlap s wife found sealed packets of Government documents in the attic of their house, it was reported that he was a Soviet agent.

Col. Thomas Fox, the chief of counterintelligence of the DIA at the time of the investigation, told me that Dunlap, a native of Bogalusa, La. had been recruited by the KGB while employed at the NSA communications-interception base at Sinop, Turkey. He had met there Major General Garrison Coverdale the chief of staff of the NSA. General Coverdale then selected Dunlap to be his personal driver at NSA. General Coverdale further arranged for Dunlap to receive top-secret clearance and a position in the NSA.'s traffic-analysis division. Since the general's car had "no inspection" status, Dunlap could drive off the base with documents hidden in the car and then return without anyone knowing that the material had been removed from the base.

Moreover, Dunlap had other high-level connections in the NSA The Carroll Report, a secret DOD document (part of which I received through a Freedom of Information Act request) named after Gen. Joseph F. Carroll, who was asked to investigate the case, noted that Dunlap had helped a colonel at NSA pilfer some "expendable items of Government property" from his office. >From this incident, the report deduced, "Dunlap had already had experience in circumventing NSA procedures under relatively high level tutelage." The implication was that he had expanded his access to secret files by offering to help officers appropriate furniture and other articles from their offices.

When General Coverdale left NSA in August 1959, Dunlap was reassigned as a driver to the new NSA. chief of staff, General Watlington. By continuing his chauffeuring, Dunlap retained access to the "no inspection" vehicle necessary for smuggling documents on and off the base.

The Carroll Report makes it clear that Dunlap was interrogated by NSA investigators just before he died. According to Colonel Fox, the DOD investigating team did not establish any connection between Dunlap and the three NSA employees who fled to Moscow. Since four KGB. moles had been uncovered in the NSA., the agency found it necessary to change its secret codes, encoding machinery, security procedures and entire modus operandi.

While Dunlap was chauffeuring around the NSA chief of staff at Fort Meade, the KGB developed another mole at the pinnacle of American military intelligence Lieut. Col. William Henry Whalen. Colonel Whalen who was the intelligence advisor to the Army Chief of Staff. Since Colonel Whalen, as intelligence adviser, could demonstrate a "need to know," he had access to virtually all military planning and national intelligence estimates. In return for money, he regularly supplied secrets to his Soviet case officer over a three-year period , even after he had retired from the Army because of a physical disability. According to his subsequent indictment, the highly classified data sold to the KGB included "information pertaining to atomic weaponry, missiles, military plans for the defense of Europe, estimates of comparative military capabilities, military intelligence reports and analyses, information concerning the retaliation plans by the United States Strategic Air Command and information pertaining to troop movements. " He gave away, in short, a wide range of national secrets available to the Joint Chiefs of Staff. (Pleading guilty in 1966 to charges of conspiring with a Soviet agent to divulge national defense documents, Col Whalen was sentenced to 15 years in prison, and paroled after six years.)

Through the services of Dunlap and Whalen, the KGB succeeded, as Angleton put it, in "opening the window" on virtually all American intelligence-gathering activities in the Soviet bloc. Just as the CIA was able to ferret out KGB moles by tracing the documents that Goleniewski provided from Moscow to their source,, the KGB could presumably trace the military intelligence reports and analyses that Whalen provided to whatever traitors existed in the Soviet intelligence apparatus. During this period, 1958 to 1963, the KGB did in fact succeed in catching the CIA's two prize moles in Moscow, Peter Popov and Oleg Penkovsky. Both were executed.

HOW DO WE WEED OUT THESE MOLES?

Even in the light of these past Soviet successes in penetrating the NSA and Defense Department, there is considerable resistance in the intelligence community to confronting the possibility that the KGB has used the same techniques and resources to establish new and undetected moles in American intelligence. For one thing, there is little bureaucratic incentive for searching for moles: If the search is a failure, it will be viewed as a demoralizing witch hunt; if it is successful, it will completely undercut trust in the past work of the intelligence service. Just as the British Secret Service resisted the idea that it had been infiltrated by KGB moles even after it had received the incriminating documents from Goleniewski, the FBI elected not to pursue evidence of a mole. For example, William C. Sullivan, A/Director of the FBI for Domestic Intelligence until 1971, claims that J. Edgar Hoover, the FBI Director, refused to allow him to move against what he was convinced was a Soviet mole in the FBI's New York office. In his autobiography, Sullivan describes how he discovered the leak and, unable to identify the mole, proposed transferring, one by one, all personnel out of the suspected section. Hoover replied, "Some smart newspaperman is bound to find out that we are transferring people out of the New York office," and flatly rejected the request. The source of the leak had not been removed from the office, or further identified, when Sullivan retired. Similarly, the CIA has relied on polygraph examinations to uncover moles, even though there is no empirical evidence that they work. In 1978, for example, a 23-year-old watch officer in the CIA named William Kampiles sold to the KGB a top-secret manual explaining the technical operations of the KH-11 satellite system that is used over the Soviet Union. When the CIA investigated, it discovered that there were at least 13 other missing KH-11 manuals. Kampiles had passed all his polygraphs.

The strategy denial is of course self-fulfilling. So long as a secret service denies it is possible to penetrate it, it is unlikely to find evidence of such penetration.

FOR ADDITIONAL INFO: <http://www.angelfire.com/dc/1spy/dunlap.htm>'>http://www.angelfire.com/dc/1spy/dunlap.htm> and <http://www.ang

http://www.spiritus-...troversies.htmlelfire.com/dc/1spy/index.htm>

JAMES JESUS ANGLETON CONNECTION:

BALTIMORE SUN SERIES

5. Jack E. Dunlap

Sgt. Jack E. Dunlap was a NSA courier who allegedly sold secrets to the Soviet Union for three years; he killed himself while under investigation in 1962. Scott Shane, "Some at NSA Betrayed Country," from Scott Shane and Tom Bowman, "No Such Agency," Baltimore Sun, reprint of six-part series, 3-15 December 1995, 6

Martin and Mitchell and Hamilton

…In 1960 William H. Martin and Bernon F. Mitchell, defected to Russia. They held a news conference in Moscow, describing in detail the inner workings of the NSA. They were soon discovered to be homosexuals, a fact which led indirectly to the resignation of the NSA's personnel director, and the firing of twenty-six other employees for sexual deviation.

It also led on May 9, 1963 to a vote by the House, 340 to 40, to give the Secretary of Defense the same absolute power over NSA employees as the Director of Central Intelligence had over his employees. Under the legislation, which was introduced by the Un-American Activities Committee, the Secretary of Defense was authorized to fire NSA employees without explanation and without appeal if he decided they were security risks. The bill also required a full field investigation of all persons before they were hired.

The legislation was attacked by several congressmen.

Thomas P. Gill, the Hawaii Democrat, warned that the bill opened the way to "arbitrary and capricious action on the part of government administrators ... There has been much said about danger to the national security. Democracy itself is a dangerous form of government and in its very danger lies its strength. The protection of individual rights by the requirement of due process of law, which has long endured in this nation of ours, is a radical and dangerous idea in most of the world today.

"This dangerous concept is outlawed in the Soviet Union, in Red China, in Castro's Cuba, indeed, in all of the Communist bloc and many of those countries aligned with it. I think we might well ask: How does one destroy his enemy by becoming like him?"

Edwin E. Willis, the Louisiana Democrat and a member of the Un-American Activities Committee, defended the bill on grounds that the NSA, "carries out the most delicate type intelligence operations of our government ... The National Security Agency plays so highly specialized a role in the defense and security of the United States that no outsider can actually describe its activities. They are guarded not only from the public but from other government agencies as well. The Civil Service Commission, which audits all government positions, is not allowed to know what NSA employees do."

If the bill was so important for the NSA, Willis was asked, why shouldn't it be applied to all other sensitive agencies?

"As to the other agencies," Willis replied, "we will have to take them one at a time."

Although the Martin and Mitchell case stirred the House to action, it was only one of several sensational security scandals to hit the NSA….

On July 22, 1963, Izvestia published a letter from Victor Norris Hamilton, a naturalized American of Arab descent who had sought asylum in the Soviet Union. Hamilton said he had worked for a division of the NSA which intercepted and decoded secret instructions from Arab countries to their delegations at the United Nations. Hamilton claimed UN Ambassador Henry Cabot Lodge had sent a letter to the division thanking them for the information. The Pentagon admitted Hamilton had been an employee of the NSA and said he had been discharged in 1959 because he was "approaching a paranoid-schizophrenic break." (The NSA has an unusually high rate of mental illness and suicide.)

An even graver security breach at the NSA was also disclosed in July of 1963. Army Sergeant First Class Jack E. Dunlap committed suicide when he realized he had been discovered selling top-secret NSA documents to Soviet officials. Dunlap reportedly received $60,000 during a two-year period for disclosing United States intelligence on Russian weapons advances, the deployment of their missiles and troops, as well as similar information about the NATO countries.

The playboy sergeant, who had a wife and five children, spent the money on several girl friends, two Cadillacs and frequent trips to the race track. A Pentagon official described the case as "thirty to forty times as serious as the Mitchell and Martin defections."

These security violations revealed a mass of information about the NSA. And most of it was indirectly confirmed by the Pentagon in its contradictory statements on the case, and by the House Un-American Activities Committee in issuing a public report stressing the seriousness of the Martin and Mitchell defection.

http://www.bibliotec...ecretgov_5g.htm

His grave is located just a few steps from the place where later was the funeral of President John F. Kennedy. So now one of the greatest heroes of the U.S. rests next to a traitor and a spy, which humiliated considerable harm to his country.

Sergeant Jack Dunlap was the usual 'average' American. He lived with his family in a normal house in a suburb of Washington, and brought home the most usual salary - $ 100 per week. Like most 'average' Americans, he moonlighted at night to have additional means of livelihood. But the day job, Dunlap went beyond the usual.

Every morning, Dunlap was a member of spetspropusku at Fort Meade - one of the most impressive buildings across America. The length of its main corridor about three times greater than the length of a football field. Its walls were literally infested with electric cables and wires. In the cellars of Fort Meade were the most powerful computers in the world. Radio antennas receive information from around the globe. The building is surrounded by three rows of barbed wire under an electric voltage. Territory adjacent to the Fort Mido, patrolled by armed soldiers marines.

Inside the cement fortress built in the form of the Latin letter U, the work does not stop for a minute. Hundreds of people day and night to process sensitive information, deciphered coded messages and studied and analyzed the information obtained. This building was the headquarters of the NSA, one of the major U.S. intelligence agencies.

Boy on the premises

Dunlap was not a cryptographer. His position was much more modest. Although Dunlap and had the rank of Sergeant U.S. Army, the NSA, he worked as a simple courier. His work was to distribute documents from one department to another. Officially, his title was 'clerk-messenger' - a little more honorable unless the post of errand boy. If employees know and Dunlap, the only person. His name no one bothered to remember.

But Dunlap was not such a quiet, insignificant country, which seemed to be around. At one time he was awarded several medals for bravery. He also served as a driver for NSA Chief of Staff.

But it did not suit such an existence. He believed that deserves a better life. And in 1960. has a chance to achieve the desired. In that year - the third year of service Dunlap from the NSA - with him to contact the agent out of the Soviet intelligence. Dunlap agreed to work on the Soviet Union. He promised a lot of money. From Dunlap needed to make copies of documents passing through his hands, to make them secret NSA from the building and send another Soviet agent, is absolutely safe. Nobody in no suspect. In the end, is not he a sergeant U.S. Army - loyal soldier, worthy of every kind doveriyaN

Beautiful Life

Only during the first year of work for Soviet intelligence Dunlap received about 40 thousand. U.S.. This is much higher than the annual salary of a senior army officer. Style of his life dramatically changed.

Modest and quiet family man who worked part time at night at a petrol station for a dollar an hour, turned into a chic man 'in the full prime of life', literally sorivshego money. In the short time he bought a new car, yacht and powerboat. Luxury mistress followed one another. Leisure Dunlap also conducted 'in a big way': amateur regatta sailing, car racing and race boats, dancing in prestigious clubs were his favorite entertainment.

When someone asked Dunlap, where he got the money, he built himself a holy innocence. "I received a small inheritance," - usually he replied. And if someone has expressed bewilderment why such a rich man to spend your precious time and run a simple courier, Dunlap just smiled enigmatically. His low post, he declared confidently, this is only a cover. In fact, he supposedly serves the NSA one particular secret missions.

Obviously not notice

The NSA, as it were, and did not notice the sudden change in the life of a humble messenger. Nobody paid any attention to the fact that now he comes to work in an expensive car. He excused from work for the day, if he asked for time off, citing the fact that he would like to take part in races on cutters. And when he hurt his back during a sailing regatta, the authorities even sent a carriage 'ambulance' to take Dunlap in the departmental hospital.

Dunlap tried all means to maintain its reputation as an important classified 'bumps'. "They were afraid that I was under anesthesia can inadvertently give some secrets," - he said friends, devoutly attentive to the speeches.

Dunlap went on to copy secret documents directly under the noses of the NSA. Every month he gave his material obtained is connected, the Soviet agent. Most of these meetings took place in the car parks or other public places. Dunlap did not take any security measures. Once he even brought with him another lover.

However, in March 1964. Dunlap contract with the NSA over. Fearing that he might lose its 'warm place', Dunlap met to resign from the army and to join the NSA is already a civil official.

This is where it and waiting for a nasty surprise.

Lie detector

The staff of the NSA took both the military and gazhdanskih persons. It was believed that the soldiers suspicion. But civilians, went to work, should have been compulsorily tested for a lie detector.

Dunlap behaved quite calmly, but it did not save him. The test revealed cases of 'petty theft' and 'misconduct'. However, the NSA still has his work and kept him for his position. But two months later, when it was revealed that a modest live messenger is clearly beyond their means, Dunlap was finally denied access to classified information.

And now he realized that he faces big trouble. Contact agent was interrupted. The exposure was inevitable. He was expected to either life imprisonment or death in the electric chair.

Dunlap finds a solution

In June 1964. Dunlap gathered to take part in motor racing to production vehicles. He went there with a noisy company of friends and casually hinted that he wanted to commit suicide.

Nobody, of course, he did not believe. But the next day he was found half-dead. He took large doses of sleeping pills and alcohol.

After that incident, the NSA in conjunction with military police and military counter-intelligence division of the U.S. Army conducted an investigation of the case Dunlap. June 20, he tried to shoot Bystanders friend literally snatched the pistol.

Two days later, Dunlap left the city by car. Stopping at some dried-up stream, it is tightly closed all the windows and left the engine turned. His body was found the next morning. Dunlap died from choking in the exhaust gases.

Management shocked

In August, a month after the suicide of Dunlap, the NSA finally gathered evidence that he was a spy. But they never found out what kind of information Dunlap managed to convey the Soviet intelligence. "Probably we will never know how documents are passed through his hands - said one of the investigators. - It is better for us to play it safe and assume that all information held by his department, is now kept in Moscow. "

The assumption was correct. Information transmitted by Dunlap, were priceless materials for Moscow on the inner life of American intelligence.

All this was very unpleasant for the leadership of the NSA. And besides, as if in mockery of the 'snookered' superiors, Dunlap was buried at Arlington National Cemetery with full honors, relying soldier of the army. His grave is located just a few steps from the place where later was the funeral of President John F. Kennedy. So now one of the greatest heroes of the U.S. rests next to a traitor and a spy, which humiliated considerable harm to his country.

Edited by William Kelly
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  • 1 year later...

I bring this thread back to life because among the ONI records "accidentally discovered" (her words) by Terri Pike because they were "misfiled" were the defector files specifically requested by the ARRB, but apparently never turned over to the NARA by ONI. Among the defectors included in the HSCA defector study were Oswald, Martin, Mitchell and Dunlap, among others.

DUNLAP, Jack E., E6, Arlington Cemetery - Facilities Engineer Section, Det 4, 58. (1928-July 1963)

Jack Edward Dunlap

SFC E6, Facilities Engineer Section, TUSLOG Det 4, 1958

American Spy for Soviets

(1928 - 1963)

I was assigned to Fort Meade with duty as the NCOIC of the Senior Cryptologic Course (CY-155) and remember reading about Sgt Dunlap. I never met the man who I believe worked in "C" Branch, but I'm probably mistaken. The one thing that sticks in my memory was that he owned a large boat and several expensive automobiles- - -gH. Does anyone, other than Jim Baker, remember this Jack Edward Dunlap at SINOP in 1958? If so, I'd appreciate hearing from you so that the rest of the story can be told.

JIM BAKER'S SINOP REMEMBRANCES

The year (1958) I was on The Hill was definitely a watershed concerning the post. There was a constant round of construction of barracks, additions to the ELINT and COMINT facilities, upgrades to the power, etc. Power was supplied by diesel generators that were increased in size practically monthly. Because of the mission, it was critical to have an uninterrupted source of power. Commercial power from Sinop was nowhere near satisfactory, so we generated our own. All of the construction meant a large force of Turkish workers who were mostly locals hired by the company that had the contract for all of the renovation and new construction.

THE CONSTRUCTION FOREMAN AT SINOP WAS A FOREIGN INTELLIGENCE AGENT

One of the foremen, if not the main boss, of these workers was a blond-haired Eastern European. Because his physical appearance was so much different than the Turks, he certainly stood out. I learned much later, back in the States, that he was a Hungarian Intelligence agent who was assigned to learn about the mission at Sinop.

JIM BAKER'S SINOP FRIENDSHIP WITH JACK DUNLAP

Another person assigned as a facilities engineer was SFC Jack Edward Dunlap whose background was in the Airborne Infantry. Sinop was his first ASA assignment and, following his clearance coming through, he was brought to operations and thoroughly briefed on our mission. The rationale was that knowledge of the mission would impress upon him the importance of uninterrupted power. I became good friends with him and our friendship continued after we both left Sinop and were reassigned to Ft. Meade, with duty at NSA. Since he had no operational background, his initial assignment at NSA was as driver to the NSA Chief-of-Staff (the position would later be Deputy Director for Operations [DDO] ), MG Garrison B.Coverdale, [born 12 July 1905 and died 8 June 1988]. Dunlap continued in that assignment until General Coverdale left NSA, and, at the General's request was given an assignment in an operational position. This was some two years later, in 1960, and I left Ft. Meade for a three year tour in Germany. In 1963 I was back at NSA, and we resumed our acquaintance, but I had married in the meantime, so we weren't as close. In the summer of 1963, he received another ASA assignment, but decided to quit the Army after 11 years active duty and seek employment at NSA. During the routine polygraph examination, several discrepancies were noted and the FBI was called. I remember in July of 1963, a research analyst at NSA named Victor Hamilton turned up in Moscow and announced that he was defecting. One day after Hamilton defection to Moscow, my former Sinop friend, Jack E. Dunlap, was found dead of carbon monoxide poisoning - an apparent suicide in the Glen Burnie area where he resided. I t is quite possible that Hamilton's defection was brought about with his knowing that Dunlap had flunked the polygraph and was afraid that he might be next to be found out and wanted a safe place to hide from prosecution. About three years earlier two other former NSA employees, Bernon F. Mitchell and William H. Martin [both homosexuals] had defected to the Soviet Union. I've heard that Jack Dunlap was buried with honors at Arlington National Cemetery. and read that about a month later, Dunlap's wife, Diane, found sealed packets of classified documents in the attic of their house, and it was then learned that Dunlap was a Soviet agent and that he had been providing the Soviets with information for over two years. I believe that Jack Dunlap was targeted and recruited into spying for the KGB while in Sinop and working daily with the construction foreman above mentioned and not after he was assigned to NSA. In the end, he committed suicide. All of this is, of course, another story, but I wanted to mention it to give some idea of the great, worldwide interest in the mission at Sinop in the 50's.

HERE'S AN ARTICLE ON JACK DUNLAP USING SEARCH ENGINE GOOGLE.COM

One of America's most secret organizations the NSA was thought to be impenetrable by foreign agents. Its security was said to be ironclad, its tight-lipped officials unapproachable. The KGB had for some time targeted the NSA but found no way to obtain its secrets until it discovered Sergeant Jack Dunlap, a beer-drinking clerk-messenger with five children, a tired wife and mounting bills.

Louisiana-born Jack Dunlap was a career Army man. He enlisted in the U.S. Army in 1952 and served with distinction in Korea. Remaining in the service, Dunlap rose to the rank of sergeant and was assigned to the NSA in 1958. He was given top secret messages to carry to NSA officials before they had been put into code. Moreover, Dunlap was given a top-secret clearance to view these "raw" unencoded messages.

Somehow learning of Dunlap's sensitive position. a KGB agent approached the sergeant in 1958, bluntly telling him that he would be paid handsomely for the contents of the pouches he was carrying. Dunlap did not hesitate and began selling the Russians copies of all the documents he carried about. His method was reportedly simple. Before delivering the documents, he slipped them under his shirt, drove to a rendezvous in Washington, D.C., had his contact make copies or photograph them, then returned them to the pouch and went on to make his delivery.

By June of 1960, he bought two Cadillacs and a Jaguar. Next, Dunlap acquired a statuesque blonde mistress, paying her expenses. It was later estimated that Dunlap was receiving from the Soviets between $40,000 and $50,000 a year. When neighbors asked about his new riches, Dunlap said that he had inherited a plantation in Louisiana.

NSA security paid no attention to Dunlap's new lifestyle. The spy brought attention to himself in 1963. He was about to be transferred to another post, which would cut off his access to documents. To continue making money from the Soviets, Dunlap believed that he could stay on at NSA by simply not re-enlisting when his tour of duty expired. He would then go to work for the agency as a civilian.

After being mustered out, Dunlap applied for work at NSA as a civilian. As such, he required a new clearance and, unlike the military working for NSA, he was compelled to take a lie detector test. He was given a polygraph test, which he failed. Dunlap learned that NSA and Army intelligence were both looking deeply into his background.

Dunlap fearing exposure, opted for suicide. The nature of Dunlap's death did not deter the Army from burying him with honors at Arlington National Cemetery. Then the spy's wife, Diane Dunlap, discovered a large number of classified documents in their home and turned these over to NSA which then pieced together Dunlap's traitorous activities, although it was never learned exactly how many documents Dunlap had turned over to the Russians, a vexing and costly problem for America's most secret organization.

THE SPY WARS by Edward Jay Epstein, New York Times Magazine, September 28, 1980

The primary task of any clandestine intelligence service... is to establish moles within the enemy's inner sanctum who are in a position to warn changes in its plans and intentions. "No intelligence can function unless it has secret sources. The clandestine service specializes in the spotting, compromising, recruiting and handling of moles on a regular basis. This is called Human intelligence, or simply, HUMINT. Within the Intelligence community, this question has been the center of a bitter and destructive debate that has persisted unresolved for many years. Most of these agents, according to their public admissions, were induced to work for the KGB by financial rewards or sexual blackmail rather than an ideological sympathy with Communism..... During the Cold War, there were dozens of important spy cases: Sgts. Jack Dunlap, William Martin and Bernon Mitchell at NSA, etc..... Our .... Intelligence community... watch for spies from other nations.....They usually do a very professional job. Although sometimes they really "drop the ball," as in the case of Sergeant Jack Dunlap, who drove his "KGB money" sports car to work - to the NSA HQ parking lot - every day for weeks! [Flash: Strikingly similar to the last-breaking, but worse, Ames/CIA case.]

Behind a ring of three barbed-wire electrified fences at Fort Meade, Md., is the headquarters of America's most secretive intelligence service the National Security Agency (NSA.). Even though it has more employees and a larger budget than any other American intelligence including the CIA. Even though its very existence had been classified a secret in the mid 1950s, such secrecy is considered necessary because it is responsible for protecting the security of the channels through which the leaders Of the United States Government, military forces and intelligence services communicate with one another. In most cases, the NSA designs the ciphers, encoding machines and protected lines through which the nation's most closely guarded secrets are transmitted . Any breach of this system can have disastrous consequences.

Aside from protecting the nation's secret communications, the NSA intercepts and deciphers the secrets of foreign governments. Such-signal intelligence includes intercepts of telephone and radio signals, telemetry from missiles and electrical impulses from radar and sonar. Vast quantities of information about the testing, capabilities and deployment of Soviet weaponry are derived from the NSA's electronic intelligence, or ELINT. Information about Soviet intentions comes from its code and cipher operations, which is known as Communications intelligence, or COMINT.

Despite its aura of secrecy, NSA has had multiple penetrations by Soviet intelligence. On July 22, 1963, Victor Norris Hamilton, a Syrian-born research analyst at NSA headquarters, turned up in Moscow and announced that he was defecting. He had been presumably an agent of the KGB In Moscow, he joined two other former NSA employees, Bernon F- Mitchell and William H Martin, who had defected to the Soviet Union three years earlier. While working as KGB moles at NSA, they had provided the Soviet Union with information about the technical capabilities and locations of the super secret sensors that the NSA had employed against it, and also with data about the NSA's codes and breaking techniques.

One day after Hamilton defected from the NSA, Jack E. Dunlap, an employee of the NSA since 1958, was found dead of carbon monoxide poisoning - an apparent suicide. One month later, when Dunlap s wife found sealed packets of Government documents in the attic of their house, it was reported that he was a Soviet agent.

Col. Thomas Fox, the chief of counterintelligence of the DIA at the time of the investigation, told me that Dunlap, a native of Bogalusa, La. had been recruited by the KGB while employed at the NSA communications-interception base at Sinop, Turkey. He had met there Major General Garrison Coverdale the chief of staff of the NSA. General Coverdale then selected Dunlap to be his personal driver at NSA. General Coverdale further arranged for Dunlap to receive top-secret clearance and a position in the NSA.'s traffic-analysis division. Since the general's car had "no inspection" status, Dunlap could drive off the base with documents hidden in the car and then return without anyone knowing that the material had been removed from the base.

Moreover, Dunlap had other high-level connections in the NSA The Carroll Report, a secret DOD document (part of which I received through a Freedom of Information Act request) named after Gen. Joseph F. Carroll, who was asked to investigate the case, noted that Dunlap had helped a colonel at NSA pilfer some "expendable items of Government property" from his office. >From this incident, the report deduced, "Dunlap had already had experience in circumventing NSA procedures under relatively high level tutelage." The implication was that he had expanded his access to secret files by offering to help officers appropriate furniture and other articles from their offices.

When General Coverdale left NSA in August 1959, Dunlap was reassigned as a driver to the new NSA. chief of staff, General Watlington. By continuing his chauffeuring, Dunlap retained access to the "no inspection" vehicle necessary for smuggling documents on and off the base.

The Carroll Report makes it clear that Dunlap was interrogated by NSA investigators just before he died. According to Colonel Fox, the DOD investigating team did not establish any connection between Dunlap and the three NSA employees who fled to Moscow. Since four KGB. moles had been uncovered in the NSA., the agency found it necessary to change its secret codes, encoding machinery, security procedures and entire modus operandi.

While Dunlap was chauffeuring around the NSA chief of staff at Fort Meade, the KGB developed another mole at the pinnacle of American military intelligence Lieut. Col. William Henry Whalen. Colonel Whalen who was the intelligence advisor to the Army Chief of Staff. Since Colonel Whalen, as intelligence adviser, could demonstrate a "need to know," he had access to virtually all military planning and national intelligence estimates. In return for money, he regularly supplied secrets to his Soviet case officer over a three-year period , even after he had retired from the Army because of a physical disability. According to his subsequent indictment, the highly classified data sold to the KGB included "information pertaining to atomic weaponry, missiles, military plans for the defense of Europe, estimates of comparative military capabilities, military intelligence reports and analyses, information concerning the retaliation plans by the United States Strategic Air Command and information pertaining to troop movements. " He gave away, in short, a wide range of national secrets available to the Joint Chiefs of Staff. (Pleading guilty in 1966 to charges of conspiring with a Soviet agent to divulge national defense documents, Col Whalen was sentenced to 15 years in prison, and paroled after six years.)

Through the services of Dunlap and Whalen, the KGB succeeded, as Angleton put it, in "opening the window" on virtually all American intelligence-gathering activities in the Soviet bloc. Just as the CIA was able to ferret out KGB moles by tracing the documents that Goleniewski provided from Moscow to their source,, the KGB could presumably trace the military intelligence reports and analyses that Whalen provided to whatever traitors existed in the Soviet intelligence apparatus. During this period, 1958 to 1963, the KGB did in fact succeed in catching the CIA's two prize moles in Moscow, Peter Popov and Oleg Penkovsky. Both were executed.

HOW DO WE WEED OUT THESE MOLES?

Even in the light of these past Soviet successes in penetrating the NSA and Defense Department, there is considerable resistance in the intelligence community to confronting the possibility that the KGB has used the same techniques and resources to establish new and undetected moles in American intelligence. For one thing, there is little bureaucratic incentive for searching for moles: If the search is a failure, it will be viewed as a demoralizing witch hunt; if it is successful, it will completely undercut trust in the past work of the intelligence service. Just as the British Secret Service resisted the idea that it had been infiltrated by KGB moles even after it had received the incriminating documents from Goleniewski, the FBI elected not to pursue evidence of a mole. For example, William C. Sullivan, A/Director of the FBI for Domestic Intelligence until 1971, claims that J. Edgar Hoover, the FBI Director, refused to allow him to move against what he was convinced was a Soviet mole in the FBI's New York office. In his autobiography, Sullivan describes how he discovered the leak and, unable to identify the mole, proposed transferring, one by one, all personnel out of the suspected section. Hoover replied, "Some smart newspaperman is bound to find out that we are transferring people out of the New York office," and flatly rejected the request. The source of the leak had not been removed from the office, or further identified, when Sullivan retired. Similarly, the CIA has relied on polygraph examinations to uncover moles, even though there is no empirical evidence that they work. In 1978, for example, a 23-year-old watch officer in the CIA named William Kampiles sold to the KGB a top-secret manual explaining the technical operations of the KH-11 satellite system that is used over the Soviet Union. When the CIA investigated, it discovered that there were at least 13 other missing KH-11 manuals. Kampiles had passed all his polygraphs.

The strategy denial is of course self-fulfilling. So long as a secret service denies it is possible to penetrate it, it is unlikely to find evidence of such penetration.

FOR ADDITIONAL INFO: <http://www.angelfire.com/dc/1spy/dunlap.htm>'>http://www.angelfire.com/dc/1spy/dunlap.htm> and <http://www.ang

http://www.spiritus-...troversies.htmlelfire.com/dc/1spy/index.htm>

JAMES JESUS ANGLETON CONNECTION:

http://www.spiritus-...troversies.html

BALTIMORE SUN SERIES

http://intellit.musk...usotherc-f.html

5. Jack E. Dunlap

Sgt. Jack E. Dunlap was a NSA courier who allegedly sold secrets to the Soviet Union for three years; he killed himself while under investigation in 1962. Scott Shane, "Some at NSA Betrayed Country," from Scott Shane and Tom Bowman, "No Such Agency," Baltimore Sun, reprint of six-part series, 3-15 December 1995, 6

Martin and Mitchell and Hamilton

http://www.bibliotec...ecretgov_5g.htm

…In 1960 William H. Martin and Bernon F. Mitchell, defected to Russia. They held a news conference in Moscow, describing in detail the inner workings of the NSA. They were soon discovered to be homosexuals, a fact which led indirectly to the resignation of the NSA's personnel director, and the firing of twenty-six other employees for sexual deviation.

It also led on May 9, 1963 to a vote by the House, 340 to 40, to give the Secretary of Defense the same absolute power over NSA employees as the Director of Central Intelligence had over his employees. Under the legislation, which was introduced by the Un-American Activities Committee, the Secretary of Defense was authorized to fire NSA employees without explanation and without appeal if he decided they were security risks. The bill also required a full field investigation of all persons before they were hired.

The legislation was attacked by several congressmen.

Thomas P. Gill, the Hawaii Democrat, warned that the bill opened the way to "arbitrary and capricious action on the part of government administrators ... There has been much said about danger to the national security. Democracy itself is a dangerous form of government and in its very danger lies its strength. The protection of individual rights by the requirement of due process of law, which has long endured in this nation of ours, is a radical and dangerous idea in most of the world today.

"This dangerous concept is outlawed in the Soviet Union, in Red China, in Castro's Cuba, indeed, in all of the Communist bloc and many of those countries aligned with it. I think we might well ask: How does one destroy his enemy by becoming like him?"

Edwin E. Willis, the Louisiana Democrat and a member of the Un-American Activities Committee, defended the bill on grounds that the NSA, "carries out the most delicate type intelligence operations of our government ... The National Security Agency plays so highly specialized a role in the defense and security of the United States that no outsider can actually describe its activities. They are guarded not only from the public but from other government agencies as well. The Civil Service Commission, which audits all government positions, is not allowed to know what NSA employees do."

If the bill was so important for the NSA, Willis was asked, why shouldn't it be applied to all other sensitive agencies?

"As to the other agencies," Willis replied, "we will have to take them one at a time."

Although the Martin and Mitchell case stirred the House to action, it was only one of several sensational security scandals to hit the NSA….

On July 22, 1963, Izvestia published a letter from Victor Norris Hamilton, a naturalized American of Arab descent who had sought asylum in the Soviet Union. Hamilton said he had worked for a division of the NSA which intercepted and decoded secret instructions from Arab countries to their delegations at the United Nations. Hamilton claimed UN Ambassador Henry Cabot Lodge had sent a letter to the division thanking them for the information. The Pentagon admitted Hamilton had been an employee of the NSA and said he had been discharged in 1959 because he was "approaching a paranoid-schizophrenic break." (The NSA has an unusually high rate of mental illness and suicide.)

An even graver security breach at the NSA was also disclosed in July of 1963. Army Sergeant First Class Jack E. Dunlap committed suicide when he realized he had been discovered selling top-secret NSA documents to Soviet officials. Dunlap reportedly received $60,000 during a two-year period for disclosing United States intelligence on Russian weapons advances, the deployment of their missiles and troops, as well as similar information about the NATO countries.

The playboy sergeant, who had a wife and five children, spent the money on several girl friends, two Cadillacs and frequent trips to the race track. A Pentagon official described the case as "thirty to forty times as serious as the Mitchell and Martin defections."

These security violations revealed a mass of information about the NSA. And most of it was indirectly confirmed by the Pentagon in its contradictory statements on the case, and by the House Un-American Activities Committee in issuing a public report stressing the seriousness of the Martin and Mitchell defection.

http://www.bibliotec...ecretgov_5g.htm

http://www.arlington...et/jedunlap.htm

His grave is located just a few steps from the place where later was the funeral of President John F. Kennedy. So now one of the greatest heroes of the U.S. rests next to a traitor and a spy, which humiliated considerable harm to his country.

http://persona.rin.r...95/dunlap,-jack

Sergeant Jack Dunlap was the usual 'average' American. He lived with his family in a normal house in a suburb of Washington, and brought home the most usual salary - $ 100 per week. Like most 'average' Americans, he moonlighted at night to have additional means of livelihood. But the day job, Dunlap went beyond the usual.

Every morning, Dunlap was a member of spetspropusku at Fort Meade - one of the most impressive buildings across America. The length of its main corridor about three times greater than the length of a football field. Its walls were literally infested with electric cables and wires. In the cellars of Fort Meade were the most powerful computers in the world. Radio antennas receive information from around the globe. The building is surrounded by three rows of barbed wire under an electric voltage. Territory adjacent to the Fort Mido, patrolled by armed soldiers marines.

Inside the cement fortress built in the form of the Latin letter U, the work does not stop for a minute. Hundreds of people day and night to process sensitive information, deciphered coded messages and studied and analyzed the information obtained. This building was the headquarters of the NSA, one of the major U.S. intelligence agencies.

Boy on the premises

Dunlap was not a cryptographer. His position was much more modest. Although Dunlap and had the rank of Sergeant U.S. Army, the NSA, he worked as a simple courier. His work was to distribute documents from one department to another. Officially, his title was 'clerk-messenger' - a little more honorable unless the post of errand boy. If employees know and Dunlap, the only person. His name no one bothered to remember.

But Dunlap was not such a quiet, insignificant country, which seemed to be around. At one time he was awarded several medals for bravery. He also served as a driver for NSA Chief of Staff.

But it did not suit such an existence. He believed that deserves a better life. And in 1960. has a chance to achieve the desired. In that year - the third year of service Dunlap from the NSA - with him to contact the agent out of the Soviet intelligence. Dunlap agreed to work on the Soviet Union. He promised a lot of money. From Dunlap needed to make copies of documents passing through his hands, to make them secret NSA from the building and send another Soviet agent, is absolutely safe. Nobody in no suspect. In the end, is not he a sergeant U.S. Army - loyal soldier, worthy of every kind doveriyaN

Beautiful Life

Only during the first year of work for Soviet intelligence Dunlap received about 40 thousand. U.S.. This is much higher than the annual salary of a senior army officer. Style of his life dramatically changed.

Modest and quiet family man who worked part time at night at a petrol station for a dollar an hour, turned into a chic man 'in the full prime of life', literally sorivshego money. In the short time he bought a new car, yacht and powerboat. Luxury mistress followed one another. Leisure Dunlap also conducted 'in a big way': amateur regatta sailing, car racing and race boats, dancing in prestigious clubs were his favorite entertainment.

When someone asked Dunlap, where he got the money, he built himself a holy innocence. "I received a small inheritance," - usually he replied. And if someone has expressed bewilderment why such a rich man to spend your precious time and run a simple courier, Dunlap just smiled enigmatically. His low post, he declared confidently, this is only a cover. In fact, he supposedly serves the NSA one particular secret missions.

Obviously not notice

The NSA, as it were, and did not notice the sudden change in the life of a humble messenger. Nobody paid any attention to the fact that now he comes to work in an expensive car. He excused from work for the day, if he asked for time off, citing the fact that he would like to take part in races on cutters. And when he hurt his back during a sailing regatta, the authorities even sent a carriage 'ambulance' to take Dunlap in the departmental hospital.

Dunlap tried all means to maintain its reputation as an important classified 'bumps'. "They were afraid that I was under anesthesia can inadvertently give some secrets," - he said friends, devoutly attentive to the speeches.

Dunlap went on to copy secret documents directly under the noses of the NSA. Every month he gave his material obtained is connected, the Soviet agent. Most of these meetings took place in the car parks or other public places. Dunlap did not take any security measures. Once he even brought with him another lover.

However, in March 1964. Dunlap contract with the NSA over. Fearing that he might lose its 'warm place', Dunlap met to resign from the army and to join the NSA is already a civil official.

This is where it and waiting for a nasty surprise.

Lie detector

The staff of the NSA took both the military and gazhdanskih persons. It was believed that the soldiers suspicion. But civilians, went to work, should have been compulsorily tested for a lie detector.

Dunlap behaved quite calmly, but it did not save him. The test revealed cases of 'petty theft' and 'misconduct'. However, the NSA still has his work and kept him for his position. But two months later, when it was revealed that a modest live messenger is clearly beyond their means, Dunlap was finally denied access to classified information.

And now he realized that he faces big trouble. Contact agent was interrupted. The exposure was inevitable. He was expected to either life imprisonment or death in the electric chair.

Dunlap finds a solution

In June 1964. Dunlap gathered to take part in motor racing to production vehicles. He went there with a noisy company of friends and casually hinted that he wanted to commit suicide.

Nobody, of course, he did not believe. But the next day he was found half-dead. He took large doses of sleeping pills and alcohol.

After that incident, the NSA in conjunction with military police and military counter-intelligence division of the U.S. Army conducted an investigation of the case Dunlap. June 20, he tried to shoot Bystanders friend literally snatched the pistol.

Two days later, Dunlap left the city by car. Stopping at some dried-up stream, it is tightly closed all the windows and left the engine turned. His body was found the next morning. Dunlap died from choking in the exhaust gases.

Management shocked

In August, a month after the suicide of Dunlap, the NSA finally gathered evidence that he was a spy. But they never found out what kind of information Dunlap managed to convey the Soviet intelligence. "Probably we will never know how documents are passed through his hands - said one of the investigators. - It is better for us to play it safe and assume that all information held by his department, is now kept in Moscow. "

The assumption was correct. Information transmitted by Dunlap, were priceless materials for Moscow on the inner life of American intelligence.

All this was very unpleasant for the leadership of the NSA. And besides, as if in mockery of the 'snookered' superiors, Dunlap was buried at Arlington National Cemetery with full honors, relying soldier of the army. His grave is located just a few steps from the place where later was the funeral of President John F. Kennedy. So now one of the greatest heroes of the U.S. rests next to a traitor and a spy, which humiliated considerable harm to his country.

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