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Bernice Moore
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Bernice

Each year, in a class that I teach, I will hold up a 1963 US quarter. I will point out to my students that in 1963 that quarter could buy a gallon of gasoline. I then hold up a 2005 US quarter and explain that this quarter will today buy about 1/12th of a gallon of gasoline.

Returning to the the 1963 quarter I explain that because of the value of the silver in the 1963 quarter and with the current price of silver, the 1963 quarter would not only still buy a gallon of gasoline at todays prices but you would receive a little more than a dollar in change as well.

Jim Root

Edited by Jim Root
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Bernice

Each year, in a class that I teach, I will hold up a 1963 US quarter. I will point out to my students that in 1963 that quarter could buy a gallon of gasoline. I then hold up a 2005 US quarter and explain that this quarter will today buy about 1/12th of a gallon of gasoline.

Returning to the the 1963 quarter I explain that because of the value of the silver in the 1963 quarter and with the current price of silver, the 1963 quarter would not only still buy a gallon of gasoline at todays prices but you would receive a little more than a dollar in change as well.

Jim Root

Jim,

Can you tell me how much $183.87 would be worth in today's world?

That's how much Oswald left Marina on the morning of 11/22/63, taking less than $20 with him.

Also, if anyone knows, how much was a clothes washer back then? That's what Marina wanted before she would move back with Oswald.

Thanks,

And also, have you seen this? The Johnson history of NSA is interesting, although mostly redacted, and includes other familiar characters, like Gen. Cabel, Sgt. Dunlap and Martin and the other NSA defectors. I didn't know they defected via Mexico City.

BK

http://www.gwu.edu/~nsarchiv/NSAEBB/NSAEBB260/index.htmDocument 1: Thomas R. Johnson, American Cryptology during the Cold War, 1945-1989: Book I: The Struggle for Centralization, 1945-1960 (National Security Agency: Center for Cryptological History, 1995), Top Secret Umbra, Excised copy, pp. i-xvii and 1-155

Document 2: Thomas R. Johnson, American Cryptology during the Cold War, 1945-1989: Book I: The Struggle for Centralization, 1945-1960, pp. 157-287

Document 3: Thomas R. Johnson, American Cryptology during the Cold War, 1945-1989: Book II: Centralization Wins, 1960-1972 (National Security Agency: Center for Cryptological History, 1995), Top Secret Umbra, Excised copy, pp. 289-494

Document 4: Thomas R. Johnson, American Cryptology during the Cold War, 1945-1989: Book II: Centralization Wins, 1960-1972, pp. 495-652

Document 5: Thomas R. Johnson, American Cryptology during the Cold War, 1945-1989: Book III: Retrenchment and Reform, 1972-1980 (National Security Agency: Center for Cryptological History, 1998), Top Secret Umbra, Excised copy, pp. i-ix, and 1-116

Document 6: Thomas R. Johnson, American Cryptology during the Cold War, 1945-1989: Book III: Retrenchment and Reform, 1972-1980, pp. 117-262

BK

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William

You asked:

"Can you tell me how much $183.87 would be worth in today's world?

That's how much Oswald left Marina on the morning of 11/22/63, taking less than $20 with him."

Based on todays current silver value that would equal about $3500.00.

I am finding your documents to be a very interesting read.

Thanks

Jim Root

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Guest Tom Scully

(oops, all my calculations are based on $187.35 instead of on $183.87, but close enough)

Call me cray, but I don't fully understand the point of Bill's questions.

If Marina had exchanged the $187.35 Oswald left her for silver dimes, quarter and half dollar U.S. coins shortly after he was killed, and sold them on a day in early January, 1980, she would have received over $9,000 in U.S> federal reserve notes. If she sold them on a day in 2003 when my son bought pre-1965 90 percent silver, 1000 US dimes on Ebay for $354.00, UPS shipping included, she would have received $655.72.

http://news.google.com/newspapers?id=rloyAAAAIBAJ&sjid=6ekFAAAAIBAJ&pg=2776,2065992&dq=kenmore&hl=en

Kenmore Washer With 2 Speeds And 3 Cycles .Sears Price .177 .

Miami News - Google News Archive - Nov 6, 1963

Kenmore Washer with 2 Speeds and 3 Cycles Sears Price 177. NO MONEY DOWN on Sears Easy Payment Plan Just dial your fabric set water temperature and ...

EXPANSION OF CURRENCY UNDER SILVER PROGRAM ANNOUNCED BY TREASURY ...

$3.95 - New York Times - Aug 11, 1934

The silver certificates will be issued on the basis of $1.29 an ounce, instead of the 64.5 cents the government has been paying for newly mined domestic ...

SILVER SINKS BELOW 50 CENTS; 15 MONTH LOW

Pay-Per-View - Chicago Tribune - ProQuest Archiver - Dec 25, 1935

The price of bar silver fell below the level of 50 cents an ounce in New York yesterday for the first time in 15 months. Handy and Harmon, bullion brokers, ...

FUNDS ASKED TO COIN SILVER DOLLAR AGAIN

Pay-Per-View - The Sun - ProQuest Archiver - Nov 22, 1963

Much of the increasecd interest in the silver dollar undoubtedly is due lo silver's rise to a 40-year high of $1.29 an ounce. Part of the demand is due to a ...

GOLD'S ERRATIC COURSE; ; LAST WEEK

Pay-Per-View - Boston Globe - ProQuest Archiver - Jan 27, 1980

Silver got hit hard, too, falling $10 an ounce to $34 an ounce, a far cryfrom the record high of more than $50 an ounce the metal reached during one trading ...

At this moment, silver is trading @ $19.92 per ounce.:

http://www.cnbc.com/id/17689937/site/14081545

The current silver price is 15.44 X the price of $1.29 per ounce in November, 1963, and it is nearly 40 X the price on Dec. 25, 1935, and it is just 0.4 X the price on a day in early January, 1980. Thus, ...

Aug. 1934, $118.34 (.645 oz.) x 187.35

Dec. 1935, $91.93 (.50 oz.)

Nov. 1963, $241.68 (1.29 oz.)

Jan. 1980, $9,193.50 (50.00 oz.)

Apr. 2003, $655.72 (3.50 oz.)

Sep. 2010, $3,732.01 (19.92 oz.)

Sears washer in April, 2003 =$399.00

http://news.google.com/newspapers?id=qg4SAAAAIBAJ&sjid=v_IDAAAAIBAJ&pg=3463,9749033&dq=sears+washer&hl=en

2 Out Of 3 Homeowners Have An Appliance From Sears

Spokesman-Review - Google News Archive - Jun 8, 2003

2 out of 3 homeowners have an appliance from Sears now all washers and dryers on sale challenge. We re so confident that when you purchase the washer 2481 2 ...

Edited by Tom Scully
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Guest Tom Scully

The page linked to in Bernice's opening post claimed that silver certificates were suddenly no longer redeemable for silver.

http://www.ustreas.gov/education/faq/currency/sales.shtml

On March 25, 1964, C. Douglas Dillon, the 57th Secretary of the Treasury announced that silver certificates would no longer be redeemable in silver dollars. This decision was pursuant to the Act of June 4, 1963 (31 U.S.C. 405a-1). The Act allowed the exchange of silver certificates for silver bullion until June 24, 1968. This was the deadline set by the Congress. Since that date, there has been no obligation to issue silver in any form in exchange for these certificates. You may be interested to know that the Congress took this action because there were approximately three million silver dollars remaining in the Treasury Department's vaults. These coins had high numismatic values, and there was no way to make an equitable distribution of them among the many people holding silver certificates....

There was ample notice given, and anyone aware of the change in the law in June, 1963, could simply go to any bank and exchange all of their silver certificates for ordinary dimes, quarters, half and silver dollars in circulation. The only coins available in those denominations until late 1964 were .900 fine, silver.

Ten dimes contained an 9/10 ounce of pure silver, as did 4 quarters, 2 halves, or 1 silver dollar.

From 1965 until 1969, I had a neighborhood newspaper delivery route with about 75 customers. I collected an average of 65 cents from each customer each week during those years. The 1964 and earlier silver coins, especially the worn ones, and there were many half dollars and quarters too worn to read the mint dates, diminished during the four years I made my weekly collections. At least in 1965 and 1966, these coins were still numerous enough in regular circulation to be exchanged for all the silver certificates or any other paper currency denomination, any average member of the public owned.

In 1963, the U.S. treasury for the first time was faced with the cost of $1.29 per ounce for silver. It could not mint coins or redeem paper silver certificates into the indefinite future, due to the uncertainty of future prices for silver, an industrial commodity. Gold was fixed in price at $35 oz. until 1971. Silver rose in price due to supply and demand influences, and probably to a smaller degree because mining and refining costs had risen since silver traded at .645 cents in 1934.

Edited by Tom Scully
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Tom,

The only reason I asked was because Todd Leventhal, the US State Department's Minster of Mis and Disinformation, mentions that exact amount as the money Oswald left Marina on the morning he went off to kill the President, implying that he was a no-good, two bit, loser, ostensibly quoting Bugliosi. My point being that he had a substantial amount of cash on hand if he really did want to go to Mexico, or buy Marina a washing machine, or put a hundred down and buy a car, like he was capable of doing.

This reasoning doesn't make any sense, and the value of the money he had then, when reflected with inflation, shows that he was doing okay, and yes, money was not his motive, and nobody paid him a lot of money to be an assassin because he wasn't the assssin. - BK

http://educationforum.ipbhost.com/index.php?showtopic=16340&pid=200741&st=15entry200741

Leventhal: "Bugliosi also points out that Oswald had no help from any co-conspirators when fleeing after killing President Kennedy. He took a bus and then a cab back to his room in Dallas, and then hid in a movie theater. Oswald only had a total of $183.87 when he killed President Kennedy. He lived in a tiny (1.5 meters by four meters) room, which he rented for eight dollars per week. Nobody had paid him a lot of money to be an assassin."

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Bill,

To put a more direct answer to your wuestion, I went to http://www.dollartimes.com/calculators/inflation.htm and put in that $183.87 that Oswald left, 1963 as the beginning year, and 2010 as the end year. The answer I got was that $183.87 in 1963 has the buying power of $1,306.14 in 2010.

For a blue-collar guy like LHO, who was making next to nothing, that's a lot of money to be carrying...especially if Friday, November 22, 1963 was a scheduled payday. Anyone know what their pay cycle was at the TSBD? Did Ozzie miss out on a paycheck by leaving early that Friday?

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  • 7 years later...
On 9/8/2010 at 5:57 PM, Jim Root said:

William

You asked:

"Can you tell me how much $183.87 would be worth in today's world?

That's how much Oswald left Marina on the morning of 11/22/63, taking less than $20 with him."

Based on todays current silver value that would equal about $3500.00.

I am finding your documents to be a very interesting read.

Thanks

Jim Root

The purchasing power of $184 in 1963 was comparable to $1498 worth of purchasing power in 2017.

https://westegg.com/inflation/infl.cgi

--  Tommy  :sun

Edited by Thomas Graves
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Once again, from Richard Case Nagell's prison letter to Arthur Greenstein, a reference to the silver issue.  Who was Abe Greenbaum?

"Here's a more up-to-date lead on Abe Greenbaum: 'Informant F-HC reports subject handed suspected courier forty pieces of silver on 10/21/62 at Laredo, Mexico, for delivery to nuclear physicist residing in house on 92nd Street, New York City. S/A B. O. Schernnn, Washington, D.C. Field Office, reports subject seen 11/28/62 walking east on Beacon Street, constantly checking for tail, suddenly dashing into parked limousine sporting U.S.S.R. Embassy license plates, which speeds away, runs red light, terminating surveillance as Agent Schernnn forced to brake bicycle to avoid breaking the law. Informant F-111-B reports subject and suspected courier observed at King's Tavern, Wilmington, Del. on 12/6/62, paying for drinks with strange-looking silver dollars taken from bulging briefcase carried by subject. Subject now suspected of being Mr. Big in Communist plot to disrupt U.S. economy by flooding country with hard cash.'

"Abe Greenbaum, long suspected leftist is actually confirmed rightist, in deep cover, working plausible denial bit with one of nation's leading and best-financed foreign policy-making firms."

Edited by David Andrews
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