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Lyndon Johnson makes "cowboy love" to Jackie post assassination


Guest Robert Morrow
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Guest Robert Morrow

A lot of people just don't understand how the mind of a PSYCHOPATH works. For example, Ted Bundy. He could be working at a suicide hotline one day ... and killing a coed the next day. Or volunteering for the Republican party ... then killing a coed the next day.

Another example would be the BTK (Blind, Torture, Kill) serial killer Dennis Radar in Kansas. Dennis Radar could be doing zoning code enforcement one day ... and killing and torturing that night. Dennis Radar could be going to church at Christ Lutheran one day ... and killing someone the next day in the most sadistic fashion. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dennis_Rader

LYNDON JOHNSON WAS A THOROUGHBRED PSYCHOPATH and a serial killer who killed when he was desperate and scared of being exposed.

Lyndon Johnson makes “cowboy love” to Jackie post assassination

After slaughtering JFK; Flirts with widow - wants to be “daddy” of Caroline and John-John! LBJ – a thoroughbred pyschopath in action:

"During his first five weeks in office, Johnson called Jackie numerous times. Instinctively, awkwardly, he attempted to make what Hubert Humphrey referred to as “cowboy love” to her. A conversation the first week in December was typical: “Your picture was gorgeous. Now you had that chin up and that chest out and you looked so pretty marching in the front page of the New York Daily News … well,” LBJ said “I just came, sat in my desk and started signing a log of long things, and I decided to I wanted to flirt with you a little bit…. Darling, you know what I said to the Congress – I’d give anything in the world if I wasn’t here today … Tell Caroline and John-John I’d like to be their daddy!”

[LBJ: Architect of American Ambition, Randall Woods, p. 423]

Here is a good summary of the Lyndon Johnson murdered John Kennedy case

http://www.viewzone.com/lbj/lbj2.html

I do think the definitive treatment is in LBJ: Mastermind of JFK's Assassination by Phillip Nelson, which I highly recommend. http://www.lbj-themastermind.com/

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FREEMAN: Well, look, you saying, "Why are they afraid of

me, poor me, with my limited resources," that's a hard sell, Lyn!

Of course they're afraid of you: You're a scary guy! Because

everything that they do, is based on, first of all, on

maintaining an illusion. It's based on keeping the population in

something of the equivalent of a drugged state. And you come

along, and on top of being a damned good economist, you're kind

of uncompromising on questions of truth. And for this crowd? I

mean, that is -- it's catastrophic! And it's especially

catastrophic in America, where, what you threaten to do, is

awaken something that really is embedded in Americans. I mean,

it's been trampled on, it's fragile, but it's there. It's there

in the founding principles of our nation. It's there in

everything that makes up the American persona, and that is

something that, really -- I mean, I don't have any problem

figuring out why these guys are terrified of you!

But I think the more disturbing feature of it, is what you

brought up, in terms of what we see from friends of ours, people

who agree with us, people who think you play a very useful and in

many cases, they believe you play an indispensable and critical

role. Yet: Their collaboration with you, is always quiet, it's

not public. They're very nervous about it. And it's one, I

think because of their own cowardice and their fear of what the

enemy will do to them, because they've seen what the enemy has

tried to do to you. But it is, also, this insane dichotomy. You

know, people in the Clinton administration, used to tell me, back

when Clinton was President, that I had to understand the

difference between policy and politics -- and it was complete

crap! I mean, what it really was, was an exclusive, for --

politics was saying any damned thing you wanted, to get money, to

then carry out your policy, which was good and noble. But

invariably, when you have that kind of dichotomy between politics

and policy, as they've characterized it -- obviously, it's a far

more significant question -- but when you live with that kind of

dichotomy, what you then tend to see, is what was really the

tragedy of the Clinton Administration: Which is that, he was so

tied up, in quote/unquote "politics," that by the time he got

around to policy, it was the end of his Presidency. I mean, he

tends to do a better job on questions of policy now, as a former

President, than when he was President.

LAROUCHE: I think one thing, a correction on this thing:

You have to look deeper. Don't look at event-driver, or reaction

to event-driven kind of policymaking. You have to look at

essentials. Now, what I represent, as what Franklin Roosevelt

represented as president, with his character, particularly his

association with his ancestor [isaac Roosevelt], who founded the

Bank of New York, that, what we represent, as Americans, or did

represent as Americans, among the Founders, was a conception of

society, was a counter to tragedy. And that's what we represent.

Now, I happen to represent that. I'm one of the -- like the

last survivor, so to speak -- not really the last one, but I have

the character of being a typical last survivor. And I represent

that. Now, what's their reaction? What was the Clinton

administration reaction? It wasn't a Clinton administration

reaction: It was a typical reaction of what has become the

American version of liberalism.

In liberalism, the idea is, there's like an Adam Smith

conception of society, in which the emotional reactions of

pleasure and pain, drive society. The idea that there's a

principle, like a principle of economy, which determines the

failure or success of society as an economy, it occurs to them;

but it's considered as subsidiary to the assumption that it is

this pleasure/pain principle, as reacted to by various people at

various times in various ways, which drives society. And

therefore, they say, you make policy based on the pleasure/pain

aspect of politics, not on the basis of the principle which

determines success or failure. And this is a result of the kind

of liberalism, of Sarpian liberalism, the effect of which is

largely British in character, on the people of the United States.

The reason that we go down, is because of the influence of

liberalism, of British liberalism on the cultural policy of the

United States. Hollywood has become the greatest traitor to the

United States; Hollywood has become, the permanent Aaron Burr,

because of this pleasure/pain principle, which Burr himself

expresses.

And that's where the weakness in the Clinton Administration

was simply a continuation of that. I mean, you want to find

opportunism, look at the Nixon Administration. Look at how

Johnson reacted, out of fear. And look at what Kennedy reacted

in a different way, and they killed him: They killed Kennedy,

because they knew, that he was reacting with a perception of

principle, which for them was shocking, because they didn't

expect that from any of the children of his father!

STEINBERG: Right, Joe Kennedy!

LAROUCHE: Joe was not a man of principle! He was man of

collecting -- money!

But in any case, but when Jack decided to act on principle,

under the influence of Mrs. Roosevelt, for example, that, he did

something, which for the British liberal is unforgivable. And

they didn't want to punish him, for what he'd done: They wanted

to {destroy} him for what he'd done.

Now, we have a paper, which was done by Dean Andromidas, a

research paper on the background of the post-Franklin Roosevelt

role of people such as Eisenhower and MacArthur, on the question

of U.S.-Soviet relations as opposed to British relations. That

paper, which Dean has done, as a summary, is an excellent point

of reference to look at.

The fact of the matter is, that during the entire postwar

period, especially up through the 1960s, up until Nixon, you had

a fight, which was represented during the -- well, the whole

postwar period, but especially during the 1950s and 1960s. You

had the continued role of exemplary people like Eisenhower and

MacArthur. They had a different view of the postwar strategic

situation, as opposed to the British and Truman policy. That was

the policy under which Kennedy was operating, as President. He

adopted that policy, under the influence of largely, Douglas

MacArthur, and also Eisenhower, and people like them.

So, again, it goes back to the same thing: It is our

institutions, that is, in the postwar period, when you look at it

from this standpoint, that people thought {as I do, as I thought

then}, but I understand it better now: When I came back from the

war, I had a very clear view of what was wrong with the United

States that I returned to. I agreed -- I sent this letter to

Eisenhower. It was a short letter, while he was president of

Columbia [university], and gave reasons why {he should run for

President} on the Democratic ticket. He did not disagree; he

said it was not time for {him} to do that; it was inopportune for

{him} to try to play that role, then. But through the entire

period, Eisenhower, as well as, more significantly MacArthur,

understood, we will not have a conflict with the Soviet Union.

We will deal with a Stalin who now looks upon us, as being a

necessary leadership, for the reconstruction of civilization.

And we're going to play with that, as our option. That's how

Eisenhower reacted, repeatedly, as during the effort to bring

Khrushchov into line in Paris. That's the way that MacArthur

behaved, and Eisenhower behaved during the 1960s. The same way

that {I think, they thought in the same direction that I think},

and I know that.

And there are many other people, similar Americans, who

thought exactly as I think on this particular question: We are

what we are as a nation. We have an embedded characteristic,

which is what I share, and defend, and promote, that's us! This

other stuff is not us. It's an imported British piece of

corruption. And the only way we're going to solve the problem is

my way, not because of me personally, but because I am presently

the most active representative of the American tradition. And

it's the American tradition which must intervene, and it's a

tradition which is consistent with the content of our original

Constitution. {That's} what must prevail. And {that} must be

understood! Don't look for factors, look for principles.

When you're looking at history, looking at science, you're

looking not for factors, you look for principles. The universe

is shaped by principle, not by events. And that has to be

understood. But people who are frightened, who say, "I can't get

people to support me, unless I'm opportunist, unless I react to

the opportunities," that's how we lose, that's how we're

imprisoned. We're imprisoned because we believe, we have to

respond to what's called public opinion.

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Guest Robert Morrow

Now compare the Lyndon Johnson quote above, the part about wanting to be a "daddy" to Caroline and John John, with the reality of what George Reedy, John Kennedy, Robert Kennedy had to say about him. And also the very ugly reality about LBJ that author Robert Caro discovered:

George Reedy, former press secretary for Lyndon Johnson: http://www.absoluteastronomy.com/topics/George_Reedy

George Reedy on Lyndon Johnson:

"He may have been a son of a bitch, but he was a colossal son of a bitch."

"Not only did Johnson get somewhat separated from reality, he had a fantastic faculty for disorienting everybody around him as to what reality was."

"What was it that would send him into those fantastic rages where he could be one of the nastiest, most insufferable, sadistic SOBs that ever lived and a few minutes later really be a big, magnificent and inspiring leader?"

In his book, Lyndon B. Johnson: A Memoir by George Reedy… Reedy is quoted on his book flap as calling LBJ “a bully, a sadist, lout, and egoist.” He describes LBJ as “magnificent, inspiring leader; the other that of an insufferable bastard.”

"JFK once said “that Lyndon was a chronic xxxx; that he had been making all sorts of assurances to me for years and has lived up to none of them.”12 Robert Kennedy’s description of Johnson, which can be heard on the referenced Web site, was that he was “mean, bitter, vicious, an animal, in many ways; I think he’s got this other side to him that makes his relationships with other human beings very difficult, unless you want to kiss his be-hind all the time."

------------

. . . "Bobby later complained that Johnson ‘lies all the time. I’m telling you, he just lies continuously, about everything. In every conversation I have with him, he lies. As I’ve said, he lies even when he doesn’t have to.’”195 (emphasis added) JFK agreed on this point, telling Jackie on the evening of November 21, 1963 that Lyndon Johnson was “incapable of telling the truth.”196 Similar statements had been made by people who knew him when he was younger: classmates who routinely called him “Bull” (for “Bullxxxx”) Johnson because he lied so much that he was considered “the biggest xxxx on campus;” but beyond that, there was no difference to him in truth or falsehood, the facts were whatever he deemed them to be; he was, in one classmate’s words, “a man who just could not tell the truth.”197 Most men would be embarrassed to be caught in a lie, but not Johnson: men who knew him in Texas agreed that even when caught in a lie, he wouldn’t flinch; he would resume lying again about the same thing, almost immediately.198 Caro points out that this was not just a nickname used behind his back; it was used by other students to his face: “Howya doin’, Bull?”

--------------

Robert Caro spent several years interviewing people who knew him during those years and concluded: “By the time the researcher completes his work on Lyndon Johnson’s college years, he knows that one alumnus had not been exaggerating when he said, “A lot of people at San Marcos didn’t just dislike Lyndon Johnson; they despised Lyndon Johnson.

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Now compare the Lyndon Johnson quote above, the part about wanting to be a "daddy" to Caroline and John John, with the reality of what George Reedy, John Kennedy, Robert Kennedy had to say about him. And also the very ugly reality about LBJ that author Robert Caro discovered:

George Reedy, former press secretary for Lyndon Johnson: http://www.absoluteastronomy.com/topics/George_Reedy

George Reedy on Lyndon Johnson:

"He may have been a son of a bitch, but he was a colossal son of a bitch."

"Not only did Johnson get somewhat separated from reality, he had a fantastic faculty for disorienting everybody around him as to what reality was."

"What was it that would send him into those fantastic rages where he could be one of the nastiest, most insufferable, sadistic SOBs that ever lived and a few minutes later really be a big, magnificent and inspiring leader?"

In his book, Lyndon B. Johnson: A Memoir by George Reedy… Reedy is quoted on his book flap as calling LBJ “a bully, a sadist, lout, and egoist.” He describes LBJ as “magnificent, inspiring leader; the other that of an insufferable bastard.”

"JFK once said “that Lyndon was a chronic xxxx; that he had been making all sorts of assurances to me for years and has lived up to none of them.”12 Robert Kennedy’s description of Johnson, which can be heard on the referenced Web site, was that he was “mean, bitter, vicious, an animal, in many ways; I think he’s got this other side to him that makes his relationships with other human beings very difficult, unless you want to kiss his be-hind all the time."

------------

. . . "Bobby later complained that Johnson ‘lies all the time. I’m telling you, he just lies continuously, about everything. In every conversation I have with him, he lies. As I’ve said, he lies even when he doesn’t have to.’”195 (emphasis added) JFK agreed on this point, telling Jackie on the evening of November 21, 1963 that Lyndon Johnson was “incapable of telling the truth.”196 Similar statements had been made by people who knew him when he was younger: classmates who routinely called him “Bull” (for “Bullxxxx”) Johnson because he lied so much that he was considered “the biggest xxxx on campus;” but beyond that, there was no difference to him in truth or falsehood, the facts were whatever he deemed them to be; he was, in one classmate’s words, “a man who just could not tell the truth.”197 Most men would be embarrassed to be caught in a lie, but not Johnson: men who knew him in Texas agreed that even when caught in a lie, he wouldn’t flinch; he would resume lying again about the same thing, almost immediately.198 Caro points out that this was not just a nickname used behind his back; it was used by other students to his face: “Howya doin’, Bull?”

--------------

Robert Caro spent several years interviewing people who knew him during those years and concluded: “By the time the researcher completes his work on Lyndon Johnson’s college years, he knows that one alumnus had not been exaggerating when he said, “A lot of people at San Marcos didn’t just dislike Lyndon Johnson; they despised Lyndon Johnson.

This is proof he killed JFK? You're really no different than DVP. It's the same kind of goofy thinking.

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Robert

Please stop making these lame threads about LBJ

Please stop posting your list of horrible books in every other post

If you can do those two things I will start reading what you post

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Guest Robert Morrow

Robert

Please stop making these lame threads about LBJ

Please stop posting your list of horrible books in every other post

If you can do those two things I will start reading what you post

Dean, I do think the psychopathic nature to Lyndon Johnson was a key ingredient to the JFK assassination. It has been blithely ignored too long. I think the Lyndon's "cowboy love" manuevers at manipulating Jackie post assassination is a perfect example of that. I'm sure Johnson would have sent flowers to Henry Marshall's funeral in June, 1961, if he had thought of that. Of course, LBJ's hit man Malcolm Wallace was very likely the one who murdered Henry Marshall, according to the testimony of Billie Sol Estes.

I think Lyndon Johnson's cycles of killing, cover up, and pretend play-acting is key to understanding him and how we was able to pull off the JFK assassination. Another good example of this would he LBJ's play acting on Air Force One, crying in the bathroom about "conspiracy, conspiracy." LBJ was carrying on so much that Gen. Godfrey McHugh told author Chris Anderson that he needed to slap him. The Kennedy folks knew what a fraud LBJ was. But they had no idea how DANGEROUS he was.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/steven-m-gillon/a-new-wrinkle-in-the-jfk_b_339026.html

ANOTHER PERFECT EXAMPLE OF PSYCHOPATH LYNDON JOHNSON IN ACTION ("play acting fear of conspiracy" to cover his tracks. LBJ knew the Kennedy entourage suspected HIM right off the bat, so he had to do some acting as a diversionary tactic):

"What McHugh claimed to have witnessed next was shocking. "I walked in the toilet, in the powder room, and there he was hiding, with the curtain closed," McHugh recalled. He claimed that LBJ was crying, "They're going to get us all. It's a plot. It's a plot. It's going to get us all.'" According to the General, Johnson "was hysterical, sitting down on the john there alone in this thing.""

Edited by Robert Morrow
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Robert

Please stop making these lame threads about LBJ

Please stop posting your list of horrible books in every other post

If you can do those two things I will start reading what you post

Dean, I do think the psychopathic nature to Lyndon Johnson was a key ingredient to the JFK assassination. It has been blithely ignored too long. I think the Lyndon's "cowboy love" manuevers at manipulating Jackie post assassination is a perfect example of that. I'm sure Johnson would have sent flowers to Henry Marshall's funeral in June, 1961, if he had thought of that. Of course, LBJ's hit man Malcolm Wallace was very likely the one who murdered Henry Marshall, according to the testimony of Billie Sol Estes.

I think Lyndon Johnson's cycles of killing, cover up, and pretend play-acting is key to understanding him and how we was able to pull off the JFK assassination. Another good example of this would he LBJ's play acting on Air Force One, crying in the bathroom about "conspiracy, conspiracy." LBJ was carrying on so much that Gen. Godfrey McHugh told author Chris Anderson that he needed to slap him. The Kennedy folks knew what a fraud LBJ was. But they had no idea how DANGEROUS he was.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/steven-m-gillon/a-new-wrinkle-in-the-jfk_b_339026.html

ANOTHER PERFECT EXAMPLE OF PSYCHOPATH LYNDON JOHNSON IN ACTION ("play acting fear of conspiracy" to cover his tracks. LBJ knew the Kennedy entourage suspected HIM right off the bat, so he had to do some acting as a diversionary tactic):

"What McHugh claimed to have witnessed next was shocking. "I walked in the toilet, in the powder room, and there he was hiding, with the curtain closed," McHugh recalled. He claimed that LBJ was crying, "They're going to get us all. It's a plot. It's a plot. It's going to get us all.'" According to the General, Johnson "was hysterical, sitting down on the john there alone in this thing.""

When I was working to get immunity for Billie Sol Estes with the knowledge of U.S. Marshal Clint Peoples, who had advised Estes to get such immunity, Peoples told me that "It is about time that the truth comes out" in reference to LBJ. Estes needed immunity to tell what he knew about the homicides and other criminal activity committed by LBJ.

Robert, you are doing terrific work in posting this information about LBJ, who indeed was a psychopath. We will know a great deal more if the records of his psychiatrist are ever disclosed.

I have waited for decades for Robert Caro's final volume in his award-winning LBJ biography to be published. If he maintains the high standards of his previous volumes on LBJ, his final conclusion should be earth-shaking shocking.

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"When I was working to get immunity for Billie Sol Estes with the knowledge of U.S. Marshal Clint Peoples, who had advised Estes to get such immunity, Peoples told me that "It is about time that the truth comes out" in reference to LBJ. Estes needed immunity to tell what he knew about the homicides and other criminal activity committed by LBJ."

Mr Caddy,

You knew the man.How much of what Billie Sol Estes was saying was the truth, in your opinion? If you do not wish to put yourself on the spot for this, I completely understand, but it has bothered me since this all first surfaced. I have always wondered if he was just trying to get immunity (thereby saying anything to do so) as well as make a name for himself in the meantime (selling books, etc.)

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Guest Robert Morrow

Robert

Please stop making these lame threads about LBJ

Please stop posting your list of horrible books in every other post

If you can do those two things I will start reading what you post

Dean, I do think the psychopathic nature to Lyndon Johnson was a key ingredient to the JFK assassination. It has been blithely ignored too long. I think the Lyndon's "cowboy love" manuevers at manipulating Jackie post assassination is a perfect example of that. I'm sure Johnson would have sent flowers to Henry Marshall's funeral in June, 1961, if he had thought of that. Of course, LBJ's hit man Malcolm Wallace was very likely the one who murdered Henry Marshall, according to the testimony of Billie Sol Estes.

I think Lyndon Johnson's cycles of killing, cover up, and pretend play-acting is key to understanding him and how we was able to pull off the JFK assassination. Another good example of this would he LBJ's play acting on Air Force One, crying in the bathroom about "conspiracy, conspiracy." LBJ was carrying on so much that Gen. Godfrey McHugh told author Chris Anderson that he needed to slap him. The Kennedy folks knew what a fraud LBJ was. But they had no idea how DANGEROUS he was.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/steven-m-gillon/a-new-wrinkle-in-the-jfk_b_339026.html

ANOTHER PERFECT EXAMPLE OF PSYCHOPATH LYNDON JOHNSON IN ACTION ("play acting fear of conspiracy" to cover his tracks. LBJ knew the Kennedy entourage suspected HIM right off the bat, so he had to do some acting as a diversionary tactic):

"What McHugh claimed to have witnessed next was shocking. "I walked in the toilet, in the powder room, and there he was hiding, with the curtain closed," McHugh recalled. He claimed that LBJ was crying, "They're going to get us all. It's a plot. It's a plot. It's going to get us all.'" According to the General, Johnson "was hysterical, sitting down on the john there alone in this thing.""

When I was working to get immunity for Billie Sol Estes with the knowledge of U.S. Marshal Clint Peoples, who had advised Estes to get such immunity, Peoples told me that "It is about time that the truth comes out" in reference to LBJ. Estes needed immunity to tell what he knew about the homicides and other criminal activity committed by LBJ.

Robert, you are doing terrific work in posting this information about LBJ, who indeed was a psychopath. We will know a great deal more if the records of his psychiatrist are ever disclosed.

I have waited for decades for Robert Caro's final volume in his award-winning LBJ biography to be published. If he maintains the high standards of his previous volumes on LBJ, his final conclusion should be earth-shaking shocking.

Thank-you, Doug. At the time of the JFK assassination, millions and millions of Americans immediately assumed it was Lyndon Johnson. They were right on the money. Not that I don't thing there was heavy CIA/mafia involvement, which I do. LBJ was the one who brought all the killers together to murder John Kennedy. It was his caper and perhaps his co-CEO was Allen Dulles.

Another author who is highly suspicious of Lyndon Johnson is Noel Twyman, whose classic book is Bloody Treason. I highly RECOMMEND it. You can get it on Kindle for just $10. It is a must buy: http://noeltwyman.com/BloodyTreason.html

It is one of the top 10 best books ever written on the JFK assassination. Chapter 31 covers Lyndon Johnson, and yes, Mr. Caro is quoted in a passage. Tywymann has some other extremely damaging stuff on LBJ - his phone call to Will Fritz to stop the local investigation, LBJ's phone call to Dr. Crenshaw to get a "confession" from the patsy Oswald. The fact that Cliff Carter made 3 phone calls the night of 11/22/63 to Henry Wade to insist that the word "conspiracy" not be used (because LBJ WAS the conspiracy!). Here is his web page:

http://noeltwyman.com/BloodyTreason.html

Here are some AMAZON.COM REVIEWS:

"Noel Twyman is passionately sane. Read his book, begin to wake up from the 35-year-old nightmare. When that happens, the millennium has begun." Donald Freed, Visiting Distinguished Professor of Loyola University and co-author of Executive Action

"You tell Noel Twyman for me that his book is the best thing I ever read on the assassination.” James Siebert, FBI agent who witnessed the autopsy at Bethesda Naval Hospital, as reported by William Matson Law in his book, The Eye of History

"One hell of a book - a fine job of actually linking J. Edgar Hoover to the plot." John Davis, author of Mafia Kingfish

I am not an assassination buff but I have bought a fair amount of books related to the subject. I am very choosy of which book I buy because book prices are high and assassination progress is slow.

I believe Bloody Treason is a must for anybody interested in finding out new lines of enquiry and updates of old ones. Serious progress is also made in relating the enquiry into 'the big picture' of the assassination itself and the fact that more that one 'cabal' and/or groups -at many different levels- may have been actively involved.

The chapter of the forged x-rays is written in such a way that it even makes it thrilling to find out what really happened. It is detective work of a very good quality.

New theories like the forging of the Zapruder film is also painstakingly put together. In this case the subject matter is not thriller material but very important to discuss and to log.

Twyman, the author, is sincere when he cannot follow a line of enquiry for lack of time and/or when something doesn't quite add up to much but is worth discussing and considering it for further research.

Twyman also goes out of his way to maintain an objective balance in his own research. This is an example to other assassination writers. In the past, the competive nature of some researchers make them lose perspective in their own research. Twyman is genuinely complementary of other authors such as Jim Garrison, Mark Lane, David Lifton, Gaeton Fonzi and others.

If you are new reader on the assassination of Kennedy, this book is all you need for the time being. If you know a lot about it, it is vital to relate the details to the whole. Bloody Treason encompasses the entire assassination universe. From the foot soldiers and bystanders to the potential paymasters and organisers. The presentation is such that you can almost follow the planners as they close in on the kill.

I will not critisize any theory put forward in this book because each reader reader will have to do that. This book -as well as others on the subject- require an active mind on the part of the reader.

My recommendation to future assassination researchers is that they should unite according to area of expertise and thoroughly research individual lines of investigation. Then they should publish together the findings. It is a pity that investigative minds like Twyman and others have to be so broad in their research. Maybe Twyman himself should be the General Director of this investigative team because he has the right mind for it (not having been an assassination 'specialist' before the publication of this book).

Maybe this could be Twyman's next project. 10 inquisitive authors each researching anything that concerns the names that appear in Bloody Treason such as Gerry Patrick Hemmings, HL Hunt, David Sanchez Morales, William Harvey, David Atlee Phillips, E Howard Hunt, Frank Fiorini, Jean Rene Soutre and others. Imagine what can be achieved by such team investigation. I believe the next big break will come from that line of research. The first one to try it was Gaeton Fonzi with David Sanchez Morales. In a way, to cite the same 'by line' for each one of the above names is not enough. There's got to be more that can be dug out in relation directly or indirectly to the assassination. The subject is crying out for 'biographies' of these people in order to understand how the CIA, FBI work in covert operations. But from the point of view of the individual carrying out the orders.

I believe there is a fear among some researchers to go on a 'wild goose chase' if they don't cast their net wide enough and miss out on some new nugget of information.

Last but not least I would like to correct a mistake which I detected on the subject of CIA torturer Dan Anthony Mitrione. Its on page 427 under the title 'Epilogue' it reads "Morales was a CIA man in charge slaughtering the Tupamaros in Ecuador for their murdering none other than Dan Mitrone." It should ready "Uruguay" instead of "Ecuador". Mitrone worked as a CIA torture teacher in several countries in South America in the 60s and 70s but it was the Uruguayan Tupamaros that kidnapped him and after a trial he was summarily executed for the crime of being a confirmed torturer. Incidentally Mitrione was a devout Catholic with 10 children. Did he belonged to the Mafia? What was his connection to the CIA? What else knew about David Sanchez Morales? Did he work in Uruguay?

The devastating realisation of Twyman's book is that for the assassination to succeed it must have involved people at the top echelons of several US Government institutions and businesses. The quality of the planning and the cover-up is a warning to us all to be vigilant about our civil liberties and never to give up the search for truth.

Noel Twyman, with a degree in engineering, and the time, contacts and money to do it right, has brought us a work of great value. He reviews most of the major conspiracy theories, and through his own research and logical deductions finally arrives at his conclusion, a conclusion that time may show is as close to the mark as any ever put forth. By combining in-depth personal interviews with suspects such as Gerald Patrick Hemming and high-ranking Kennedy/Johnson administration officials like Robert S McNamara, with scientific re-evaluations of the autopsy photos and Zapruder film, Twyman weaves his way to his final conclusion, which unlike most other conspiracy books, includes all the evidence. A must buy for all wanting to find the truth.

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Robert

Please stop making these lame threads about LBJ

Please stop posting your list of horrible books in every other post

If you can do those two things I will start reading what you post

Dean, I do think the psychopathic nature to Lyndon Johnson was a key ingredient to the JFK assassination. It has been blithely ignored too long. I think the Lyndon's "cowboy love" manuevers at manipulating Jackie post assassination is a perfect example of that. I'm sure Johnson would have sent flowers to Henry Marshall's funeral in June, 1961, if he had thought of that. Of course, LBJ's hit man Malcolm Wallace was very likely the one who murdered Henry Marshall, according to the testimony of Billie Sol Estes.

I think Lyndon Johnson's cycles of killing, cover up, and pretend play-acting is key to understanding him and how we was able to pull off the JFK assassination. Another good example of this would he LBJ's play acting on Air Force One, crying in the bathroom about "conspiracy, conspiracy." LBJ was carrying on so much that Gen. Godfrey McHugh told author Chris Anderson that he needed to slap him. The Kennedy folks knew what a fraud LBJ was. But they had no idea how DANGEROUS he was.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/steven-m-gillon/a-new-wrinkle-in-the-jfk_b_339026.html

ANOTHER PERFECT EXAMPLE OF PSYCHOPATH LYNDON JOHNSON IN ACTION ("play acting fear of conspiracy" to cover his tracks. LBJ knew the Kennedy entourage suspected HIM right off the bat, so he had to do some acting as a diversionary tactic):

"What McHugh claimed to have witnessed next was shocking. "I walked in the toilet, in the powder room, and there he was hiding, with the curtain closed," McHugh recalled. He claimed that LBJ was crying, "They're going to get us all. It's a plot. It's a plot. It's going to get us all.'" According to the General, Johnson "was hysterical, sitting down on the john there alone in this thing.""

When I was working to get immunity for Billie Sol Estes with the knowledge of U.S. Marshal Clint Peoples, who had advised Estes to get such immunity, Peoples told me that "It is about time that the truth comes out" in reference to LBJ. Estes needed immunity to tell what he knew about the homicides and other criminal activity committed by LBJ.

Robert, you are doing terrific work in posting this information about LBJ, who indeed was a psychopath. We will know a great deal more if the records of his psychiatrist are ever disclosed.

I have waited for decades for Robert Caro's final volume in his award-winning LBJ biography to be published. If he maintains the high standards of his previous volumes on LBJ, his final conclusion should be earth-shaking shocking.

Douglas, you should contact Robert A. Caro yourself. I am sure you have the credentials to turn him on to some facts and sources.

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Pyscopath Lyndon Johnson signing the Civil Rights Act into law. This was after he had his predecessor assassinated.

post-664-087032200 1284223471_thumb.jpg

Edited by Terry Mauro
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Guest Robert Morrow

At the time of the JFK assassination, millions and millions of Americans immediately assumed it was Lyndon Johnson. They were right on the money. Not that I don't thing there was heavy CIA/mafia involvement, which I do. LBJ was the one who brought all the killers together to murder John Kennedy. It was his caper and perhaps his co-CEO was Allen Dulles.

Robert,

Where's the evidence? Seriously, I've been researching this subject for about a dozen years, read hundreds of books, numerous articles, all the Warren Commission testimony and a damn good portion of the exhibits, watched dozens of documentary films etc - and I've never come across a single solitary scrap of evidence, hard or soft, proving or even indicating that LBJ masterminded the assassination.

What have you come across that I've missed?

Martin

Martin (and anyone else) please send me an email to Morrow321@aol.com and I will send my entire "LBJ and CIA killed JFK" file. Lots of evidence in that. Also, I suggest READING the book LBJ: Mastermind of JFK's Assassination http://www.lbj-themastermind.com/

LBJ was a serial killer and psychopath - with no exaggeration at all in either of those descriptions. LBJ for 2 years had been having a sub rosa WAR with the Kennedys that was coming to a head in fall 1963. LBJ, Hoover and Allen Dulles were the hard core cover up guys. Lyndon Johnson, as "Mastermind" of the JFK assassination did not do it alone. Rather he was the coach, the team leader, the hub of the wheel that all the spokes led to.

I do believe there was heavy CIA involvement in the assassination of Lyndon Johnson; and they killed JFK for different reasons, gaming for an Operation Northwoods Cuban invasion result.

Edited by Robert Morrow
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Guest Robert Morrow

Martin (and anyone else) please send me an email to Morrow321@aol.com and I will send my entire "LBJ and CIA killed JFK" file. Lots of evidence in that. Also, I suggest READING the book LBJ: Mastermind of JFK's Assassination http://www.lbj-themastermind.com/

LBJ was a serial killer and psychopath - with no exaggeration at all in either of those descriptions. LBJ for 2 years had been having a sub rosa WAR with the Kennedys that was coming to a head in fall 1963. LBJ, Hoover and Allen Dulles were the hard core cover up guys. Lyndon Johnson, as "Mastermind" of the JFK assassination did not do it alone. Rather he was the coach, the team leader, the hub of the wheel that all the spokes led to.

I do believe there was heavy CIA involvement in the assassination of Lyndon Johnson; and they killed JFK for different reasons, gaming for an Operation Northwoods Cuban invasion result.

Robert,

I really don't want a whole file - just one piece of evidence will do.

Even if your incredible claim that LBJ was a "serial killer" was true, that wouldn't make him guilty of killing JFK would it? Anymore than being a mentally unbalanced communist wife-beater made Oswald guilty.

Please present one piece of credible evidence to back up your accusations.

BTW I'm reading that book right now.

Martin

Here is Lyndon Johnson in pschological melt down mode when he started growing his hair long just before he died. He was massively depressed and no doubt FINALLY guilt ridden at all the crimes he had committed.

2716743459_0c2606ae38.jpg?v=0

Here is another revealing photo of Lyndon Johnson as he lived much of his life. He is yelling at a heckler, in unrestrained fury: "I will put the hex on you!" ... or a visit from his hit man Malcolm Wallace as needed.

http://www.thethirdcity.org/blog/wp-content/uploads/2010/06/lbj_and_kennedy.jpg

Edited by Robert Morrow
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Guest Robert Morrow

"When I was working to get immunity for Billie Sol Estes with the knowledge of U.S. Marshal Clint Peoples, who had advised Estes to get such immunity, Peoples told me that "It is about time that the truth comes out" in reference to LBJ. Estes needed immunity to tell what he knew about the homicides and other criminal activity committed by LBJ."

Mr Caddy,

You knew the man.How much of what Billie Sol Estes was saying was the truth, in your opinion? If you do not wish to put yourself on the spot for this, I completely understand, but it has bothered me since this all first surfaced. I have always wondered if he was just trying to get immunity (thereby saying anything to do so) as well as make a name for himself in the meantime (selling books, etc.)

Doug Caddy is one of the jewels on this board Education Forum. A direct participant in historical events. Doug Caddy was ALSO a very close friend of CIA's E. Howard Hunt in Washington, DC and would do things like go to the movies with E. Howard Hunt and his wife. When Hunt got arrested for Watergate, I think Doug Caddy was perhaps his first lawyer.

Read this informative link on Doug Caddy:

http://educationforum.ipbhost.com/index.php?showtopic=4727

(You can also google him.)

Doug Caddy was a founder of Young Americans for Freedom, the hard right wing youth group. http://www.yaf.com/blog_post/show/17 [Was the year 1960?]

Doug Caddy in the 1980's was the lawyer for Billie Sol Estes as he went, on the record, and in court about the murders and crimes of Lyndon Johnson:

Lyndon Johnson was a STONE COLD KILLER:

Johnson had murdered a LOT of people by the time he made a dirty deal with the CIA to murder John Kennedy. LBJ was running “Murder, Inc.” down in Texas:

Malcolm Wallace was his hit man and killer

http://home.earthlink.net/~sixthfloor/estes.htm

LETTER #2 - FROM DOUGLAS CADDY (lawyer for Billie Sol Estes)

August 9, 1984

Mr. Stephen S. Trott

Assistant Attorney General, Criminal Division

U.S. Department of Justice

Washington, D. C. 20530

RE: Mr. Billie Sol Estes

Dear Mr. Trott:

My client, Mr. Estes, has authorized me to make this reply to your letter of May 29, 1984. Mr. Estes was a member of a four-member group, headed by Lyndon Johnson, which committed criminal acts in Texas in the 1960's. The other two, besides Mr. Estes and LBJ, were Cliff Carter and Mac Wallace. Mr. Estes is willing to disclose his knowledge concerning the following criminal offenses:

I. Murders

1. The killing of Henry Marshall

2. The killing of George Krutilek

3. The killing of Ike Rogers and his secretary

4. The killing of Harold Orr

5. The killing of Coleman Wade

6. The killing of Josefa Johnson

7. The killing of John Kinser

8. The killing of President J. F. Kennedy.

Mr. Estes is willing to testify that LBJ ordered these killings, and that he transmitted his orders through Cliff Carter to Mac Wallace, who executed the murders. In the cases of murders nos. 1-7, Mr. Estes' knowledge of the precise details concerning the way the murders were executed stems from conversations he had shortly after each event with Cliff Carter and Mac Wallace.

In addition, a short time after Mr. Estes was released from prison in 1971, he met with Cliff Carter and they reminisced about what had occurred in the past, including the murders. During their conversation, Carter orally compiled a list of 17 murders which had been committed, some of which Mr. Estes was unfamiliar. A living witness was present at that meeting and should be willing to testify about it. He is Kyle Brown, recently of Houston and now living in Brady, Texas.

Mr. Estes, states that Mac Wallace, whom he describes as a "stone killer" with a communist background, recruited Jack Ruby, who in turn recruited Lee Harvey Oswald. Mr. Estes says that Cliff Carter told him that Mac Wallace fired a shot from the grassy knoll in Dallas, which hit JFK from the front during the assassination.

[The letter continues …]

Sincerely yours,

Douglas Caddy

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"You tell Noel Twyman for me that his book is the best thing I ever read on the assassination.” James Siebert (sic), FBI agent who witnessed the autopsy at Bethesda Naval Hospital, as reported by William Matson Law in his book, The Eye of History

Of course William Law's book is about the medical evidence. That is the scope of his interviews with Sibert.

After I returned home from Florida, I sent Mr. Sibert a copy of Noel Twyman's book Bloody Treason...as a token of thanks for granting us the opportunity to interview him.

Twyman's book brings to the fore questions concerning the shipping casket versus the ornate display casket, body alteration, the forged X-ray and autopsy photos, etc.

Weeks later I called Jim, or Si as I now think of him, to see how he liked the book. "You tell Noel Twyman for me that his book is the best thing I've ever read on the assassination."

James W Sibert, it seems, is a True Believer. (In The Eye of History, page 288)

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