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A JFK conference in Hawaii to promote unity


Joseph Backes
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Reply from Harvey (Yazijian) of AIB, Bill if you could please pass this on to Roger. The BK Harv is referring to is Bob Katz.

Hi, Dawn.

I'd like to hear Willy and BK weigh in, but I'd like to know why the name AIB is needed, by who, and for exactly what reason. By the way, I'm going to try to see Douglas when he speaks in Cambridge on 10/1.

By the way, all the Tea Partiers who are going to vote voted yesterday. Turnout is much larger on election day; it remains to be seen how many will actually win.

Harvey

Hi all,

I seldom post here but lurk almost daily, and have been following this thread with interest.

Insofar as what to call this new effort, I have two cents to throw in. With all due respect to the AIB and everything it accomplished, I would suggest that after thirty-something years, it has no real name recognition with the general public. So I don't think there is any compelling reason to use it.

Likewise, with all the known differences of opinion between existing organizations, I don't see any reason to use COPA, Lancer, or whatever for this purpose.

I would propose some new name be dreamed up -- the Fiftieth Anniversary Coalition, or something along those lines. Something baggage-free, to reflect what I hope would be some new sense of at least temporary unity.

Beyond that, I think Roger Feinman's initial comments are excellent, in particular his "two general concepts."

John Kelin

All previous organizations have assorted baggage. Lancer is at war with COPA. AIB is long ago obsolete. Kelin's suggestion is the way to go.

Jack

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The single most effective way to convince the average American that JFK was taken out by a conspiracy is to focus on the faking of the Zapruder film. That is the only attention-grabbing issue that has not been beaten to death in the past and is sufficiently non-technical, non-medical, and non-scientific to be effective, especially in our visually dominated, film and television culture. Once the public is exposed to the massive proof the film is a fabrication, it will finally understand we were sold a bill of goods using fake evidence, phony witnesses, and cover-up commission.

For those who are unfamiliar with the overwhelming evidence of film fakery, consider "US Government Official: JFK Cover-Up, Film Fabrication", http://onlinejournal.com/artman/publish/article_5772.shtml; "THE JFK ASSASSINATION FILM HOAX: AN INTRODUCTION", http://www.assassinationscience.com/johncostella/jfk/intro/; "New Proof of JFK Film Fakery", http://www.opednews.com/articles/opedne_jim_fetz_080205_new_proof_of_jfk_fil.htm; and "Zapruder JFK Film impeached by Moorman JFK Polaroid", http://www.opednews.com/articles/Zapruder-JFK-Film-Impeache-by-Jim-Fetzer-090324-48.html.

For an accessible introduction, see http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cwks80Fz9Wo&p=8693C9FDAABC3EF9&playnext=1&index=6.

A large proportion of members of this board remain unconvinced that the Z-Film is fabricated. The Z-Film is kryptonite to the critic's cause. It will be the other side using it against us that is my worry.

Those "who remain unconvinced" have not looked at the abundant evidence.

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The idea of a unity movement is a great one. In fact, something like this is crucial, before the 50th anniversary and the onslaught of the Hanks HBO nonsense and what are sure to be "new" documentaries, probably with Gary Mack providing his "expertise" on the subject.

I don't hold out much hope, however, that something like this can ever be done. This thread illustrates a few of the predictable disagreements that will inevitably ensue. I agree with Bill, regarding the location for such a critic's summit. Hawaii would, I believe, transmit the image of fun and frivolity in an idyllic location. Hardly the message we would want to get out there. I think that Washington, D.C. would be the perfect location. I love the idea of a march; the nation's capital is the center of political power, and if we could get enough people involved, the mainstream media would have to pay attention. Wouldn't it be uplifting to see Mark Lane, Vincent Salandria, Oliver Stone or perhaps Dexter King (which would evoke strong historical images) speaking from the steps of the Lincoln Memorial, for example?

At this point, any unity movement would have to concentrate on the single issue that holds us all together; JFK was not killed by a lone assassin. We have to leave behind the fractious theories, and concentrate on demonstrating that the official story, sold to the public nearly 50 years ago, is impossible. We also need to focus on countering the upcoming Hanks production- which will unfortunately probably sway far too many people over to the dark side. Anyone from Hollywood that could participate in such a march, and be willing to speak publicly, would be an important asset to have. Like it or not, the majority of our population isn't interested in the minutiae we debate on forums like this. We need to concentrate on the most ridiculous aspects of the official thesis- the single bullet theory, the sham of an autopsy, the Secret Service's abysmal performance and the inexcusable murder of Oswald.

If we could all put aside our personal pride, and work together on this momentous issue, it can be done. Our egos have to be suppressed, and old animosities between individuals and groups have to be suspended, at least temporarily. If we can't find it in ourselves to make something like this happen, then it is a sad certainty that the steady trend from neo-conspiracy to lone nutterism will eventually prevail, resulting in the research community becoming only a distant memory and the official fairy tale firmly stamped forever in the history books.

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What about a kickstart in Hawaii and then a fanning out of a coordinated convergence on Washington, gathering people on the way? The idea has precedents, and the process could be carefully marshalled by educators and a travelling library and internet/phone networking. The Media couldn't ignore that for too long. 2bits

edit typos

Edited by John Dolva
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The idea of a unity movement is a great one. In fact, something like this is crucial, before the 50th anniversary and the onslaught of the Hanks HBO nonsense and what are sure to be "new" documentaries, probably with Gary Mack providing his "expertise" on the subject.

I don't hold out much hope, however, that something like this can ever be done. This thread illustrates a few of the predictable disagreements that will inevitably ensue. I agree with Bill, regarding the location for such a critic's summit. Hawaii would, I believe, transmit the image of fun and frivolity in an idyllic location. Hardly the message we would want to get out there. I think that Washington, D.C. would be the perfect location. I love the idea of a march; the nation's capital is the center of political power, and if we could get enough people involved, the mainstream media would have to pay attention. Wouldn't it be uplifting to see Mark Lane, Vincent Salandria, Oliver Stone or perhaps Dexter King (which would evoke strong historical images) speaking from the steps of the Lincoln Memorial, for example?

At this point, any unity movement would have to concentrate on the single issue that holds us all together; JFK was not killed by a lone assassin. We have to leave behind the fractious theories, and concentrate on demonstrating that the official story, sold to the public nearly 50 years ago, is impossible. We also need to focus on countering the upcoming Hanks production- which will unfortunately probably sway far too many people over to the dark side. Anyone from Hollywood that could participate in such a march, and be willing to speak publicly, would be an important asset to have. Like it or not, the majority of our population isn't interested in the minutiae we debate on forums like this. We need to concentrate on the most ridiculous aspects of the official thesis- the single bullet theory, the sham of an autopsy, the Secret Service's abysmal performance and the inexcusable murder of Oswald.

If we could all put aside our personal pride, and work together on this momentous issue, it can be done. Our egos have to be suppressed, and old animosities between individuals and groups have to be suspended, at least temporarily. If we can't find it in ourselves to make something like this happen, then it is a sad certainty that the steady trend from neo-conspiracy to lone nutterism will eventually prevail, resulting in the research community becoming only a distant memory and the official fairy tale firmly stamped forever in the history books.

:clapping

Beautiful. I agree. Thank you.

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Mary Ferrell's JFK Manifesto – October 6, 1992, Dallas, Texas.

http://jfkcountercoup.blogspot.com/2010/09/mary-ferrells-jfk-manifesto.html

As the 30th anniversary of the assassination of President John F. Kennedy descends on us, I am much concerned that we are on the threshold of a failure from which there will be no forgiveness.

We must WIN this struggle for the truth…and do so very quickly, lest the assassination of President Kennedy flounder on some remote shoulder of the highway, in a century who's history is already on the way to the printer. In the next century, this case could be relegated to obscure questions on high school history examinations.

If tomorrow's newspapers reported having uncovered complete particulars concerning a new cast of conspirators and their motivations for assassinating President Abraham Lincoln – with John Wilkes Booth reduced to a pawn in the hands of a group of highly placed officials, would it have much of an impact? I think not. In another decade, Lee Harvey Oswald may seem as remote to the younger generation as John Wilkes Booth does to us today.

Time is our most relentless and uncompromising enemy. What happens during this conference can make a difference. Of course we will be scoffed at and demeaned by the media and the wagging fingers of Warren Commission survivors, scolding us for refusing to believe the conclusions of those honorable men. Privately they are beginning to worry.

In a recent issue of U.S. News & World Report, it was reported that seven members of the Warren Commission's staff held a meeting in Washington in early August of this year to discuss how best to defend themselves and their report.

With the help of the establishment media, our detractors will again refer to us as "conspiracy junkies" who delight in conclaves such as this; a fringe group which would be better off availing themselves of treatment for emotional disorders, instead of working to solve a case which, according to them, was solved long ago.

History teaches us that significant changes are often accomplished by small numbers of people, facing large odds. Many of them have succeeded in defiance of the government. Thomas Paine, John Adams, Thomas Jefferson, Washington and their followers represented a tiny fraction of this country's population. In the early years of their protests against British Rule, they were considered by many, especially "the government", to be disloyal, malcontents, motivated by vile goals.

They were a distasteful joke in the face of King George's authority and his vast legions, including so-called "loyalists" who applauded the British for hanging a school teacher named Nathan Hale. In case King George's legions have forgotten, Washington and his followers WON that fight.

Earlier in this century, on August 23, 1927, the State of Massachusetts electrocuted Nicola Sacco and Bartolomeo Banzetti, Italian immigrants and anarchists, who were convicted of murdering a security guard during a robbery in East Braintree. A tremendous controversy ensued, challenging the validity of their guilt – before, during and after they were executed. Supporters of Saacco and Vanzetti were called "malcontents," "zealots," "agitators," and "bleeding hearts."

Fifty years later, on July 19, 1977, Massachusetts Governor Michael Dukakis issued an official proclamation apologizing to the families of Sacco and Vanzetti who, it had been discovered, were innocent of the crime for which they had been put to death.

The roster of those who have traveled the highway of dissent, alone, is one we should review:

- For denying his daughter admission to a public school, Oliver Brown took the Topeka, Kansas, Board of Education all the way to the United States Supreme Court…ending segregation in public schools.

- Rosa Parks, a weary black women who refused to change her seat during a bus ride in Selma, Alabama…challenged the ordinance which relegated her to the back of the bus…and won.

- An obscure minister named Martin Luther King, from the Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta, Georgia, preached non-violent civil disobedience against intolerance…and won.

- A small band of idealists, called "Freedom Riders" appeared powerless in the face of millions of segregationists, the governors of several states…police wielding tear gas, wholesale arrests, murders, brutal beatings, and "Bull" Conner with his attack dogs….but the Freedom Riders finally won that one, too.

- In the early days of Vietnam, anti-war demonstrators, numbering far less than one percent of our population, took to the streets and ignited a movement which ended the career of Lyndon Johnson and finally, the war itself. They were labeled "peacenicks," "beatnicks" and "traitors," but they too, finally won.

- Two obscure reporters for the Washington Post wrote stories related to a bizarre burglary at the Democratic National Committee headquarters in Washington D.C. They accused high officials at the White House, the Justice Department, and the Committee to Re-Elect President Richard M. Nixon of inspiring the burglary, obstruction of justice, illegal break-ins, illegal wiretaps, perjury and a plethora of other serious crimes. The perseverance of those two reporters – Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein – eventually brought down the administration of Richard Nixon and forced him to resign.

- The grandson of Italian immigrants became a lawyer – who lost 41 out of 42 cases. He became a prosecutor and finally a Federal Judge. He presided over the Watergate trial and stood up to the President of the United States, forcing the President to release his papers and secretly recorded tapes. He died in August of this year, at 89 years of age, still insisting that the system works. His name was John J. Sirica.

If you think the group assembled here today seems small, you should have been with me in 1967 and 1968 during the first meetings I participated in on this subject. Sylvia Meagher, Penn Jones, Jr., Harold Weisburg, Bud Fensterwald and I would sit in my living room or in my kitchen arguing about what we should argue about – and wondering if we would ever reach the public with our research. We didn't have computers or fax machines, or, certainly in my case, much mTimeoney.

For those of you who managed to attend this conference, I have every confidence that you are representative of millions who share our views. Please be assured that we CAN make a difference.

In the echelons of the Federal government and the establishment media, we who are assembled here are referred to as "conspiracy buffs," "nuts," "kooks," "profiteers," "charlatans," just plain "crazies," ….or all of the above. Remember the roster of those who have gone before us, and let's consider ourselves in good company.

Time magazine got so alarmed with one of us a while back, they reviewed his movie without seeing it! Maybe that's what they mean by the phrase, "a landmark in American journalism." Jim Garrison wrote something in A Heritage of Stone that summed up my feelings about the Time article when he wrote: "First we executed the suspect (Oswald) and then we held the trial." That was a considerable departure from what was being taught in our law schools.

That we hotly dispute one another's theories about this case is of small consequence, weighed against our common belief that the election of our President was nullified with bullets, instead of ballots.

That is what keeps us united in our cause.

That is what, according to the polls, is a view which is shared by the overwhelming majority of our fellow citizens,….that a conspiracy and a government-sponsored cover-up, blotted out the rights of our citizens and the sanctity of the rule of law.

And that is what will forever be paramount among all of the issues which continually dog our deliberations. Issues about autopsy photos, magic bullets, pictures of Oswald which are obviously not Oswald, numbers and styles of coffins, and all of the other issues, cannot eclipse the ultimate violation of the rights of citizens in a democracy designed for the people….NOT for the convenience of elected officials and their appointees.

In the forward to Accessories After the Fact, Sylvia Meagher wrote:

"On the day of the assassination the national climate of arrogance and passivity in the face of relentless violence – beatings, bombings, and shootings – yielded in some quarters to a sudden hour of humility and self-criticism. The painful moment passed quickly, for the official thesis of the lone, random assassin destroyed the impulse for national self-scrutiny and repentance."

A few paragraphs latter Sylvia wrote:

"Few people who have followed the events closely – and who are not indentured to the Establishment – conceive of the Kennedy assassination as anything but a political crime. That was the immediate and universal belief on November 22 before the opinion-makers got to work endorsing the official explanation of the complex mystery as Gospel and entreating all good citizens to do the same."

Sylvia wrote those words in December of 1966.

If we are truly living in the land of the free and the home of the brave, we'd better damn well prove it now, by forcing a just resolution to an event which occurred on a public street within easy view of the building we are gathered in today.

Thank you.

Mary Ferrell

Edited by William Kelly
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''That we hotly dispute one another's theories about this case is of small consequence, weighed against our common belief that the election of our President was nullified with bullets, instead of ballots.'' Mary Ferrell.....

thanks bill for reposting Mary's paper,, still stands true as do sylvia's words...b

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Can a US wide movement, starting up in the west (hawaii), fanning out across the nation gathering interested persons, spreading the news, converge on Washington for a demo demanding that the government acts be organised?

People from the pacific rim, south america, canada and europe could then have an opportunity to coordinate participation.

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