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Lyndon Johnson was the ultimate psychopath


Guest Robert Morrow
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I live in Austin, TX which is nice. I like to ask old people, people older than 65 what they thought about Lyndon Johnson. The man has no defenders. Almost universally people have anecdotes on how corrupt beyond belief Lyndon Johnson was. Even people who worked directly for him will tell you what a bastard he was. All the love in town is reserved for Lady Bird Johnson, who is considered a revered figure. Even the local Democrats shun Lyndon Johnson; their annual dinner is a "Ralph Yarborough" dinner. I remember one time I went to a nursing home, and one of the ladies there was one of LBJ's mistresses. Someone else told me that one of his requirements for secretaries was "Does she shuck her drawers."

Lyndon Johnson the man is an embarassment down here still. Nobody celebrates his birthday, or his death, or his "accomplishments" (murdering JFK, etc.); the media TV, radio, newspaper, Univ. of Texas are pretty much silent about the man. Nobody throws a big party in his honor such as a "Reagan Day" dinner. Talk to the Republicans, they will tell you LBJ was insanely corrupt. Talk to the Democrats, ditto. Lyndon Johnson in Austin, TX in the year 2010 is like an open herpes sore: no one wants to touch him!

.... now about Dallas ...

John Kennedy on 11/18/63 told George Smathers that Lyndon Johnson was making one of his absurd demands: that Jackie Kennedy ride with Lyndon Johnson in his car on the Texas trip. That right there is "smoking gun" evidence of Lyndon Johnson's participation in the JFK assassination. That is a clever, cunning psychopath in action. Lyndon Johnson knew that John Kennedy was going to be assassinated in a motorcade in Dallas, and out of a twisted sense of chivalry, is trying to get Jackie into the relative safety of his car and out of the kill zone.

Remember what LBJ told his beloved Mistress Madeleine in the morning of 11/22/63: That son-of-a-bitch crazy Yarborough and that goddamn f___king Irish mafia bastard Kennedy, will never embarass me again!" [Texas in the Morning, p. 167]

There is no need to give Lyndon Johnson "the benefit of the doubt" on anything and especially the JFK assassination. There is nothing that he did in his entire life to have earned that. Quite the contrary, read Caro's and Dallak's biographies and you run across mountains of examples of Johnson depraved, crooked and bizarre behavior. The anti-social whackjob in the JFK assassination was not LHO, but rather Lyndon Johnson himself, the usurper president! Bill Moyers and Richard Goodwin, 2 aides SEPARATELY went to see a psychiatrist inquiring about Lyndon Johnson's mental condition. Also, read George Reedy's book on LBJ - calls him a lout and a SADIST. That description from a 15 year aide. LBJ had a sick desire to break men. While at the time time the guy himself could barely function; he was a paranoid basket case (PROJECTING his evil intentions/tactics on others), smoking 3 packs of cigarettes a day and sucking down cases of low end Cutty Sark scotch.

Here is Lyndon Johnson talking through his aide Bill Moyers to get that "goddamned" bubble off JFK's car. Bill Moyers was on the phone from Austin, TX barking out these orders for the Secret Service in Dallas:

"Moyers had been on the phone with Ms. Harris, informing her that the President did not want the bubbletop. He told Harris to 'get that God-damned bubble off unless it's pouring rain.' Shortly thereafter the weather began to clear. Ms. Harris approached Sorrels about the bubble-top and together they had the agents remove the glass top."

[Phillip Nelson, LBJ: Mastermind of JFK's Assassination, p.428] Nelson's source for this quote is HSCA, Volume 11, p. 526.

Lyndon Johnson was also a control freak when he was in one of his manic periods, when he was pulling off one of his devious capers, machinations, he had dozens of them. Example would be President Lyndon Johnson calling Will Fritz on 11/23/63 and telling him to STOP his investigation, that he had the right man (patsy LHO). Another would be LBJ on 11/24/63 calling Parkland Hospital himself and personally talking to Dr. Charles Crenshaw and trying his best to get a confession out of the accused assassin (patsy) the dying Oswald.

Did not mean to forget Lyndon Johnson on literally the afternoon of 11/22/63 calling his financial advisor, saying he had to SELL HIS HALLIBURTION STOCK!

Pardon my asking, but what in the hell is going on in the mind of that man? Remember, LBJ has done nothing to earn "the benefit of the doubt" in his entire life. That is not the state of mind of a man worried about an "international conspiracy" or "nuclear war" or being killed by a hit squad on the loose. It is the state of mind of a man trying to think of all the ways he can of covering up his participation in the slaughter of the nation's president.

[From Family of Secrets by Russ Baker, p. 132]

Pat Holloway, former attorney to both Poppy Bush and Jack Crichton, recounted to me an incident involving LBJ that had greatly disturbed him. This was around 1PM on November 22, 1963, just as Kennedy was being pronounced dead. Holloway was heading home from the office and was passing through the reception area. The switchboard operator excitedly noted that she was patching the vice president through from Parkland Hospital to Holloway’s boss, firm senior partner Waddy Bullion, who was LBJ’s personal tax lawyer. The operator invited Holloway to listen in. LBJ was talking “not about a conspiracy or a tragedy,” Holloway recalled. “I heard him say: ‘Oh I gotta get rid of my goddamn Halliburton stock.’ Lyndon Johnson was talking about the consequences of his political problems with his Halliburton stock at a time when the president had been officially declared dead. And that pissed me off… It really made me furious.”

Then post assassination, Lyndon Johnson starts making "cowboy love" to Jackie, telling her he wants to be the "daddy" of Caroline and John-John.

From LBJ: Architect of American Ambition:

“During his first five weeks in office, Johnson called Jackie numerous times. Instinctively, awkwardly, he attempted to make what Hubert Humphrey referred to as “cowboy love” to her. A conversation the first week in December was typical: “Your picture was gorgeous. Now you had that chin up and that chest out and you looked so pretty marching in the front page of the New York Daily News … well,” LBJ said “I just came, sat in my desk and started signing a log of long things, and I decided to I wanted to flirt with you a little bit…. Darling, you know what I said to the Congress – I’d give anything in the world if I wasn’t here today … Tell Caroline and John-John I’d like to be their daddy!”

[LBJ: Architect of American Ambition, Randall Woods, p. 423]

That, my friend, is a CHAMPION psychopath in action. Lyndon Johnson slaughter's Jackie's husband, then he wants to be the "daddy" of Caroline and John-John. All the while telling Kennedy's staff "Ah need yew more than he ever did" to every one of them.

So what is a "psychopath?" A psychopath is someone who often looks "normal" sometimes even "charming" but there is something seriously wrong with them. They use people. They have no empathy. They are dangerous. Another psycopath would be Ted Bundy - volunteers at a suicide hotline - then its on to slaughtering coeds. How many markers of a psychopath does Lyndon Johnson display. Really? Let's see if Lyndon Johnson displays characteristics of a psychopath.

A psychopath will use people for excitement, entertainment, to build their self-esteem and they invariably value people in terms of their material value (e.g. money, property, comfort, etc..). They can involve and get other people into trouble quickly and they seem to have no regret for their actions. To date there is no checklist of behavior and symptoms that will tell you with certainty whether or not a person is a psychopath. But there are warning signs. The following warning signs are based on my experience but primarily research conducted by Robert Hare, Ph.D - the leading expert on the Psychopathic Personality.

http://www.crisiscounseling.com/articles/psychopath.htm

Characteristics of a Psychopath

1) superficial charm [LBJ would find a powerful person, then totally bootlick them.]

2) self-centered & self-important [100% LBJ]

3) need for stimulation & prone to boredom [Yes, hated to be alone]

4) deceptive behavior & lying [Possibly LBJ's #1 trait]

5) conning & manipulative [ LBJ not just conning, but "cunning" - master manipulator]

6) little remorse or guilt [how about killing the nanny Dale Turner? Is that ruthless enough for you?]

7) shallow emotional response [Yes.]

8) callous with a lack of empathy [besides lying, the other great trait of LBJ]

9) living off others or predatory attitude [God yes, like a jackal or hyena]

10) poor self-control [many examples of this]

11) promiscuous sexual behavior [Very promiscous. Bragged he had more women by accident than JFK had on purpose]

12) early behavioral problems [LBJ's grandmother PREDICTED he would go to jail.]

13) lack of realistic long term goals [Tell everyone for decades he was going to be President, (even if he had to kill to get there)]

14) impulsive lifestyle [impulsive, yes, but also a clever planner and manipulator]

15) irresponsible behavior [LBJ should have been executed by the state multiple times]

16) blaming others for their actions [Robert Kennedy was not the only one he hated]

17) short term relationships [Johnson had long term relationships; but if you threatened him, they got shorter real quick with a call to Mac Wallace]

18) juvenile delinquency [LBJ's grandmother PREDICTED he would go to jail.]

19) breaking parole or probation [Lyndon Johnson, too cunning, clever, ruthless and dangerous to go to jail! But he had to murder to cover up many things. He was not far away from jail.]

20) varied criminal activity [kickbacks, taking bribes, blackmailing, jury tampering, murder - A+ criminal. Should have been executed multiple times over.]

The idea that psychopaths eat people is a myth. In reality, a person with a psychopathic personality can lead what appears to be an ordinary life. They can have jobs, get married and they can break the law like anyone else. But their jobs and marriages usually don’t last and their life is usually on the verge of personal chaos. They are almost always in some kind of trouble or they are not far from it.

A psychopath is usually a subtle manipulator. They do this by playing to the emotions of others. They typically have high verbal intelligence, but they lack what is commonly referred to as "emotional intelligence". There is always a shallow quality to the emotional aspect of their stories. In particular they have difficulty describing how they felt, why they felt that way, or how others may feel and why. In many cases you almost have to explain it to them. Close friends and parents will often end up explaining to the psychopath how they feel and how others feel who have been hurt by him or her. They can do this over and over with no significant change in the person's choices and behavior. They don't understand or appreciate the impact that their behavior has on others. They do appreciate what it means when they are caught breaking rules or the law even though they seem to end up in trouble again. They desperately avoid incarceration and loss of freedom but continue to act as if they can get away with breaking the rules. They don't learn from these consequences. They seem to react with feelings and regret when they are caught. But their regret is not so much for other people as it is for the consequences that their behavior has had on them, their freedom, their resources and their so called "friends." They can be very sad for their self. A psychopath is always in it for their self even when it seems like they are caring for and helping others. The definition of their "friends" are people who support the psychopath and protect them from the consequence of their own antisocial behavior. Shallow friendships, low emotional intelligence, using people, antisocial attitudes and failure to learn from the repeated consequences of their choices and actions help identify the psychopath.

Robert waxes on about Operation Mockingbird but then swallows every word the major publishing companies have offered up in their effort to obfuscate the JFK murder.

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Robert, last word from me, but you DO have to physically murder people to be called a serial killer. It's almost always has to have a sexual component. http://www.uplink.com.au/lawlibrary/Documents/Docs/Doc5.html Someone who orders hits isn't classified a serial killer, in as much as someone who commands armies should be considered one. It's not semantics.

And, after reading Nelson's LBJ, what does he really add that Zirbel and McClellan hadn't already, along with Johnson's biographers?

Don't get me wrong, he was an immensely cold and ruthless man, probably a narcissistic personality type, but serial killer he wasn't.

Edited by Steve Duffy
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Guest Robert Morrow

Isn't an accomplice or planner of murder as guilty?

The answer, of course, is anyone who plans, orders, or assists in a murder (an accomplice) is as guilty as the person who pulled the trigger. If you are Lyndon Johnson and you are ordering assassinations - which LBJ had a LONG history of doing - then you are as much a murderer as the hit man who carried it out.

I do not even see why we are arguing this point. Again, some folks like to play with semantics as they attempt to IGNORE the ugly, dangerous reality of who Lyndon Johnson was: a murderer who had murdered a lot of people before he murdered (with significant help) John Kennedy.

Edited by Robert Morrow
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Guest Robert Morrow

Lyndon Johnson was at times a barely functioning psychopath. LBJ was an extremely dangerous man who would literally murder you if he thought you could or would expose his criminalities. [Got his hit man Malcolm Wallace off hook for Doug Kinser murder, Sam Smithwick prison slaying, killing Dale Turner nanny of his mistress Madeleine Brown, Henry Marshall slaying 1961] There is not a doubt in my mind that Lyndon Johnson was suffering "paranoid disintegration" while he was president, and crumbling under the pressures of the Vietnam War, which LBJ was largely responsible for.

[Then there is the tragic crash and deaths of his 2 pilots in Feb. 1961; who he ranted, demanded ORDERED that they fly in total fog to his ranch which had no instrument landing equipment. That is reckless endangerment and manslaughter and typical tyrannical, narcisstic LBJ behavior. LBJ was desperate to fly to a meeting with Billie Sol Estes regarding the cover up of that scandal.]

His key aide George Reedy described much of LBJ's unstable behavior in his book Lyndon Johnson: A Memoir: http://www.amazon.com/Lyndon-B-Johnson-George-Reedy/dp/0836266102/ref=sr_1_2?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1285603318&sr=1-2

A lot of Johnson's paranoia was a result of him PROJECTING his OWN evil intentions and tactics on others. LBJ would be thinking "If I were the political enemy, here is what I Lyndon Johnson sociopath would be doing to do undermine, betray, spy on, lie to, or murder my political enemy." So Johnson was a paranoid basketcase.

Johnson was AT THE SAME TIME both a highly functioning, cunning, clever, dangerous animal AND a manic-depressive psychopath, paranoid basket case on the verge of collapse at any moment. A lot of Johnson's motivation was FEAR. Fear at being exposed for the fraud and criminal that he was. Johnson liked power, money, sex ... like everyone else. But he took these lusts to extremes and was in constant FEAR of being exposed for his criminal tactics.

Hugh Sidey, in TIME, 1988:

Even before the Viet Nam War consumed Lyndon Johnson, his dark rantings sometimes shocked the White House press corps. The first serious criticism of his conduct of foreign policy came in 1965, when he sent 20,000 troops into the Dominican Republic to quell domestic violence. Stung, Johnson summoned a small group of reporters to an off-the-record lunch that began at 1:30 p.m. and did not end until 5:30. The four hours were taken up by the President's pacing, raving, justifying his action. When it was over, the numbed newsmen hurried to a nearby bar for a stiff drink. The most experienced of the group stared into his double martini and muttered, "That was really frightening."

Now Richard Goodwin, a former speechwriter and aide to L.B.J., has taken such recollections several steps further. In his memoir of the 1960s, Remembering America (Little, Brown; $19.95), Goodwin writes that Johnson was at times literally crazed and that his episodic madness helped propel the U.S. into "a needless tragedy of such immense consequences ((Viet Nam)) that, even now, the prospects for a restorative return remain in doubt." He brazenly diagnoses Johnson's large eccentricities as "incursions of paranoia," which led to leaps "into unreason" that "infected the entire presidential institution."

Whether or not Goodwin's amateur psychiatry is clinically correct, he has dared probe a dim corner of Washington history, a suppressed repository of whispered stories and yellowing memos written in shocked disbelief, describing Johnson's stalking the back corridors of the White House and fulminating about the enemies he saw surrounding him. Nor is such speculation confined to Johnson. In the final throes of Watergate, the tortured Richard Nixon could not focus on meetings, wandered the White House halls at night and sank to his knees in prayer with Secretary of State Henry Kissinger, behavior that suggested to some that he had lost all touch with reality.

Goodwin experienced the standard Johnson outrages: an interview with L.B.J. as the President sat on the toilet, a nude policy council in the superheated White House swimming pool. But from his diary of the crucial years 1964 to 1967 and from the shadows of his memory, the writer reconstructs the larger pattern of behavior that disturbed him. Goodwin did not speak up sooner, he writes, because of "misplaced loyalty or personal cowardice." An angry swarm of Johnson intimates now attacking Goodwin suggest more basic motives: money and notoriety.

Yet Goodwin, who helped name and fashion so much of the policy of that era (John Kennedy's Alliance for Progress, L.B.J.'s Great Society, Eugene McCarthy's crusade of dissent, Bobby Kennedy's glowing visions so tragically destroyed), cannot be dismissed. His controversial assessment of Johnson is embedded in the longer narrative of Goodwin's journey into power and out again. The book is a velvety recitation of being at the center but never of it, the brilliant crafter of ideas and words, too arrogant and defiant to last in any job very long but always sought by those scaling the heights. A lawyer by training, Goodwin read books on psychiatry and recounted the episodes of his diary to friends who were psychiatrists. Goodwin claims that another Johnson aide, Bill Moyers, had the same misgivings and also consulted practicing psychiatrists. "In all cases," writes Goodwin, "the diagnosis was the same: we were describing a textbook case of paranoid disintegration, the eruption of long-suppressed irrationalities." Moyers has refused comment on Goodwin's account.

Goodwin's case is built on Johnson's obsession that the world was being swept by Communists. L.B.J.'s enemies of all stripes included not only guerrilla leaders in distant countries but "those Kennedys" or "those Harvards." According to Goodwin, Johnson once told him, " 'You know, Dick, the Communists are taking over the country. Look here,' and he lifted a manila folder from his desk. 'It's Teddy White's FBI file. He's a Communist sympathizer.' " At another time: "The Communists already control the three major networks and the 40 major outlets of communication." Thus, by Goodwin's account, did L.B.J.'s fantasies propel the country into Viet Nam.

Walt Rostow, Johnson's National Security Adviser, last week scoffed at the assertions. Former Secretary of State Dean Rusk called the account "utter nonsense." Jack Valenti, a loyal friend who served Johnson in the White House for three years, suggested that almost anything written about Johnson, including Goodwin's story, was true at one time or another. "He was the same as Lincoln, Napoleon, Churchill and other notable leaders," Valenti retorted. "He was an elemental force. He was eccentric. He used words and body language as weapons. He kept people off guard. But he knew what he was doing all the time."

George Reedy, Johnson's onetime press secretary and a wise counselor for years, said L.B.J. did have paranoid tendencies at times. "Goodwin is reporting accurately," said Reedy. "But I don't think Dick really knew Johnson." Horace Busby, another of Johnson's old-timers, declared, "If you did not know Johnson, you would think he was nuts."

Goodwin's postpublication rebuttal is that the Johnson loyalists were too close. They became hardened to his dangerous behavior, denying the reality of what was happening to the man. "Johnson's excessive secrecy and lying, his suspicion, fit into a pattern that made it hard for him to make proper decisions," said Goodwin last week. "The final irony is that the only guy who saw how disastrous the Viet Nam War could be was Johnson himself." In the book, Goodwin quotes a gloomy Johnson proclaiming, "I'm going to be known as the President who lost Southeast Asia." Paranoid or not, Johnson was painfully aware of the tragedy unfolding at his hands.

Read more: http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,968364-2,00.html#ixzz10kIsvu46

Edited by Robert Morrow
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Interesting. Thanks Bernice.

Even before the Viet Nam War consumed Lyndon Johnson, his dark rantings sometimes shocked the White House press corps. The first serious criticism of his conduct of foreign policy came in 1965, when he sent 20,000 troops into the Dominican Republic to quell domestic violence. Stung, Johnson summoned a small group of reporters to an off-the-record lunch that began at 1:30 p.m. and did not end until 5:30. The four hours were taken up by the President's pacing, raving, justifying his action. When it was over, the numbed newsmen hurried to a nearby bar for a stiff drink. The most experienced of the group stared into his double martini and muttered, "That was really frightening."

Now Richard Goodwin, a former speechwriter and aide to L.B.J., has taken such recollections several steps further. In his memoir of the 1960s, Remembering America (Little, Brown; $19.95), Goodwin writes that Johnson was at times literally crazed and that his episodic madness helped propel the U.S. into "a needless tragedy of such immense consequences ((Viet Nam)) that, even now, the prospects for a restorative return remain in doubt." He brazenly diagnoses Johnson's large eccentricities as "incursions of paranoia," which led to leaps "into unreason" that "infected the entire presidential institution."

Read more: http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,968364,00.html#ixzz10kRaTUbe

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your welcome peter;

on a replay, i took heed of this this information also on the RFK video....

the feud carried right on to the very end and past after bobby's death apparently.....b

lbj tried to block rfk's being buried in arlington, nor would he sign the appropriation papers. he was finally convinced by some around him,to allow the burial at arlington, but it took republican president richard nixon to finally sign the papers, yes he must have grinned...if i had read this in the past i must have forgotten, but have now found reference to it all over the web, in a search, it also appears within several books on lbj....

In June 1968, Robert Kennedy was shot by a deranged Arab nationalist in Los Angeles. As the Senator lay dying, Johnson went on national television to express his ''shock'' and ''dismay.'' That evening, Johnson repeatedly phoned the Secret Service to ask if Kennedy had died. He paced the floor for hours, phone in hand, muttering: ''I've got to know. Is he dead? Is he dead yet?'' This, sadly, was not the end of it. Though Johnson promised Kennedy's family to do ''anything I can do to help,'' he delayed their lone request -- to finance a permanent grave site for the Senator at Arlington National Cemetery, next to his brother John's. In 1969, a new President took the appropriate steps. As he signed the final authorization, Richard Nixon, who knew a thing or two about political grudges, must have smiled.

print out interview with Shesol

NICHOLAS KATZENBACH ON RFK AND LBJ VIDEO FROM ANSWERS .COM VIDEOS

Edited by Bernice Moore
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Guest Robert Morrow

your welcome peter;

on a replay i took heed of this this information also on the RFK video....

the feud carried right on to the very end and past after bobby's death apparently.....b

lbj tried to block rfk's being buried in arlington, nor would he sign the appropriation papers. he was finally convinced by some around him,to allow the burial at arlington, but it took republican president richard nixon to finally sign the papers, yes he must have grinned...if i had read this in the past i must have forgotten, but have now found reference to it all over the web, in a search it is also appears within several books on lbj....

In June 1968, Robert Kennedy was shot by a deranged Arab nationalist in Los Angeles. As the Senator lay dying, Johnson went on national television to express his ''shock'' and ''dismay.'' That evening, Johnson repeatedly phoned the Secret Service to ask if Kennedy had died. He paced the floor for hours, phone in hand, muttering: ''I've got to know. Is he dead? Is he dead yet?'' This, sadly, was not the end of it. Though Johnson promised Kennedy's family to do ''anything I can do to help,'' he delayed their lone request -- to finance a permanent grave site for the Senator at Arlington National Cemetery, next to his brother John's. In 1969, a new President took the appropriate steps. As he signed the final authorization, Richard Nixon, who knew a thing or two about political grudges, must have smiled.

print out interview with Shesol

NICHOLAS KATZENBACH ON RFK AND LBJ VIDEO FROM ANSWERS .COM VIDEOS

The Russian intelligence service ALSO believe that Lyndon Johnson assassinated John Kennedy. Maybe we should have had the Russian KGB serve on the Warren Commission (I mean the Allen Dulles, LBJ-appointed commission)

http://www.oah.org/pubs/nl/97feb/khall-feb97.html

"Another 1964 FBI document that details the analysis done by the KGB's American operations of the assassination. The document reveals the extent to which the American intelligence services had penetrated the KGB in this country and underscores the fact that the Russian intelligence service believed that President Lyndon Johnson had likely masterminded the operation."

I would wager one reason the Russians thought Lyndon Johnson did it was because of back channel communications from Jackie and Robert Kennedy to them, stating thaty THEY - the Kennedys - thought it was a DOMESTIC CONSPIRACY that had murdered John Kennedy.

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While Robert may be over the top in calling LBJ a serial killer, I don't think that many here would be surprised to learn that he approved of assassinating his enemies, if not ordered them directly. To those of you who haven't done so, read J.Evetts Haley's classic book from the 1960s, called "A Texan Looks At Lyndon." It was one of Penn Jones' favorite books, I believe.

Again, I don't think LBJ was the ultimate mastermind behind the assassination, but it's extremely naive to think that this crooked career politician would have opposed such an action. On the contrary, I think the evidence indicates he would have welcomed such an idea and endorsed it wholeheartedly.

LBJ was a moral cretin who reeked corruption.

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Guest Robert Morrow

Here is a good book on Lyndon Johnson: "Power Beyond Reason: The Mental Collapse of Lyndon Johnson" by D. Jablow Hershmand and Gerald Tolchin

http://www.amazon.co...27204302&sr=1-1

This book chronicles the scary mental collapse of Lyndon Baines Johnson. It also details the origins of this and how he lived his life.

If you want to understand Lyndon Johnson, I suggest read this book along with LBJ Mastermind which draws from it. Book Description:

"What happened when the most powerful nation in the world gave its highest office to a man who came to believe that God was selecting his bombing targets. This examination of Lyndon Johnson, a paranoid manic-depressive, answers that question. Using virtually everything ever written about the president, this book examines what drove him throughout his life and especially during the Vietnam War. Did his bipolar disorder shape his personality? Evidence demonstrates his manic-depression dictated much of his Vietnam policy. This is the type of serious book Lyle Stuart has been associated with throughout his career of publishing best-selling books. It is a highly controversial look at the mental breakdown of President Johnson and is sure to get attention. Publication is planned around election time to get most exposure at a time when we examine our leaders with closer scrutiny. With shocking revelations, this book expands on the LBJ material that has been published."

Lyndon Johnson was a sick man. A mentally sick man. Manic-depressive, pathological xxxx, sociopath, psychopath, at critical times, especially in his presidency: delusional, hallucinating, on the verge of and in the depths of cuckoo-land.

He was also a "sexual gorilla" as described by friends. A manic, who was often severely depressed. Very insecure. Paranoid in the real sense of the word. A schemer, a plotter; someone who was fundamentally dishonest.

Just yesterday I talked to a man here in Austin, TX, who told me that in 1969, the Austin Aqua Fest beauty queens were sent to the LBJ ranch to visit Johnson. 61 year old LBJ of course, made hard sexual passes at them in his office.

LBJ also had a jeep where he would take the young ladies to a secluded area on his ranch. Then it was game on as the young beauties either submitted to LBJ or spent hours fighting off the advances of a horny, alcoholic, psycotic psycopath.

The man who told me these stories is age 66 in year 2012 and used to date one of these Austin Aquafest lovelies, who told him those stories.

ARTHUR SCHLESINGER ET ALIA ON LYNDON JOHNSON:

January 14 1969

I took part with Bill Moyers, Jack Valenti, Eric Goldman and Ted Sorensen (in Kansas City) in a National Education Television commentary. Afterward Bill and I went over to the Algonquin for a drink. We talked a bit about the problem of writing about Johnson. Bill said, as he has said to me before (and Dick Goodwin has said even more often), that one great trouble was that no one would believe it. He said that he could not see how one could write about Johnson the private monster and Johnson the public statesman and construct a credible narrative. "He is a sick man," Bill said. At one point he and Dick Goodwin became so concerned that they decided to read up on mental illness - Dick read up on paranoia and Bill on the mani-depressive cycle."

[schlesinger, Journals, p. 306]

January 15 1971

Last night I spoke at the annual dinner of the Century. I sat next to Mac Bundy and we discussed, among other things, the Khrushchev memoirs. I remarked on the curious resemblance between Khrushchev's account of the life around Stalin - the domineering and obsessive dictator, the total boredom of the social occasions revolving around him, the horror when invited to attend and the even greater horror when not invited - and Albert Speer's account of the life around Hitler. Mac said, "When I read Khrushchev, I was reminded of something else in addition - my last days in the White House with LBJ."

[schlesinger, Journals, p. 333]

Longtime LBJ aide George Reedy on what a narcissicist, bully, sadist & lout Lyndon Johnson was

Reedy worked for LBJ from 1951-1965

"He was notorious for abusing his staff, for driving people to the verge of exhaustion- and sometimes over the verge; for paying the lowest salaries for the longest hours of work on Capitol Hill; for publicly humiliating his most loyal aides; for keeping his office in a constant state of turmoil by playing games with reigning male and female favorites."

"There was no sense in which he could be described as a pleasant man. His manners were atrocious- not just slovenly but frequently calculated to give offense. Relaxation was something he did not understand and would not accord to others. He was a bully who would exercise merciless sarcasm on people who could not fight back but could only take it. Most important, he had no sense of loyalty- at least, not the kind of loyalty I learned on the Irish Near North Side of Chicago, where life was bearable only because people who had very little in the way of wordly goods had very much in the way of mutual trust. To Johnson, loyalty was a one-way street: all take on his part and all give on the part of everyone else- his family, his friends, his supporters."

[Reedy, p. x]

"He was cruel, even to people who had virtually walked the last mile for him. Occasionally he would demonstrate his gratitude for extraordinary services by a lavish gift- an expensive suit of clothes, an automobile, jewelry for the women on his staff. The gift was always followed by an outpouring of irreverent abuse (I believe he thought his impulse was an example of weakness for which he had to atone) and a few members of his entourage noted that gift was invariably tax deductible on his part. Furthermore, some of the most lavish presents frequently went to members who had performed no services other than adulation. And when his personal desires were at stake, he had absolutely no consideration for the situation in which other people found themselves. They were required to drop everything to wait upon him and were expected to forget their private lives in his interests. He even begrudged one of his top assistants a telephone call to his wife on their wedding anniversary, which the assistant was spending on the LBJ ranch and his wife at their home in Washington, D.C." [Reedy, xiv]

"He had a habit of adopting all useful thoughts as his own, and often the originator of highly important ideas would forget his or her own authorship in a matter of hours and be ready to swear that the whole thing originated in the brain of "the Leader." [Reedy, xvi]

"He had a remarkable capacity to convince himself that he held the principles he should hold at any given time, and there was something charming about the air of injured innocence with which he would treat anyone who brought forth evidence that he had held other views in the past. It was not an act. His whole life was lived in the present and he was tenacious in his conviction that history always conformed to current necessities." [Reedy, p. 2]

"To complicate the picture, his own view of what had happened frequently shifted. To the outside world, this appeared as a form of mendacity. It is my firm belief, from close association over a number of years, that the man never told a deliberate lie. But he had a fantastic capacity to persuade himself that the "truth" which was convenient for the present was the truth and anything that conflicted with it was the prevarication of enemies. He literally willed what was in his mind to be reality and, as he was a master at imposing his will upon the people, the society, and the world around him, he saw no reason for history to be exempt from the process."

[Reedy, p. 3]

"That other man had to be Robert Kennedy, whom he regarded as the focal point for all the forces who sought the downfall of Lyndon Johnson." [Reedy, 6]

"As a rule, his language colorful, pointed, and what can most charitably be described as "earthy." His "humor" was based chiefly on the contents of toilet bowls and he was addicted to "pie-in-the-face" practical jokes. His favorite spectator sport was watching bovine copulation and he gloried in summoning fastidious males to his bathroom, where conference and excretion could be intermingled. His consumption of beverage alcohol was for purposes other than sacramental and in quantities that did not accord St. Paul's "a little wine for thy stomach's sake." [Reedy, p.34-35]

"They had to be young, they had to be cheerful, they had to be malleable, and it helped if they were slightly antagonistic to him at the outset. He dearly loved to convert an anti-Johnson liberal with a slightly plump figure and a dowdy wardrobe into a lean, impeccably clad female whose face was masked in cosmetics and who adored the ground he walked on (or, at least, told him she adored the ground he walked on). To her, he would pour out all his dreams and aspirations in what (as it was described to me later by one woman with a sense of humor) was an incredibly potent monologue. The motif was that he trusted her loyalty and needed her wisdom and she had to come with him to occupy the top spot in his organization. It was an offer rarely refused.

The reality was somewhat different. The best the woman could hope for was a position as his private secretary. She learned very quickly that it was not the post of a top "advisor." He had no respect for the political intelligence of any woman except his wife- and, unfortunately, he usually listened to her only when he had done something stupid and had to find a bail-out manuever.

There were many compensations for the reigning favorite. She could look forward to travel under plush conditions, attendance at glamourous social functions with the Johnsons (he would always find a "safe" male for an escort), expensive clothes, and frequent trips to New York, where a glamorous make-up artist would initiate her into the mysteries of advanced facial make-up, resulting in cosmetics so lavishly applied that they became a mask."

[Reedy, p. 36]

"Very few reigning favorites were allowed to run the office for any great length of time. One of them, who held his attention longer than the rest and for whom he exhibited some really deep feelings, was married off, probably because a continued relationship was incompatible with the vice presidency.

The others dropped back into the pool known to the male staff members (speaking under their breaths) as "the harem." His greatest joy was traveling with a large number of women over whom he could fuss- buying their clothes, supervising their diets, and admonishing them at every public stop to "put on some fresh lipstick." It was quite a show. He may have been "just a country boy from the central hills of Texas" but he had many of the instincts of a Turkish sultan of Istanbul."

[Reedy, p. 37]

"The result of all of this was an office in a constant state of turmoil. A new reigning favorite meant a period of several weeks in which workable routines would be upset; morale would fall to all-time lows; efficiency would go out the window."

(Reedy, p. 37)

"He was rarely candid, and when he spoke of personal matters his words were such a mixture of fantasy, euphemism, and half-truth that it was impossible to separate out the nuggets of revelation. In this case, however, the facts are compelling. As it became clearer that inexorable forces were pushing him into the small circle of men from whom the nation picks its chief executives, he developed a pattern of conduct that indicated beyond a doubt a desire to revert to childhood. He intermingled, almost daily, childish tantrums; threats of resignation (which I realize in retrospect were the equivalent of the small boy who says he will take his baseball and go home); wild drinking bouts; a remarkable nonpaternal yen for young girls; an almost frantic desire to be in the company of young people."

[Reedy, p. 56]

"A few weeks after his heart attack in 1955, he summed up the whole problem when he told a conference of doctors, gathered to evaluate his condition, that he enjoyed nothing but whiskey, sunshine, and sex. Without realizing what he was doing, he had outlined succinctly the tragedy of his life."

[Reedy, p. 56]

"The drinking bouts became increasingly heavy and increasingly frequent. When he was with staff members, there would usually be a point at which he would launch a tirade reviling an assistant for a long series of fancied wrongs and assumed inadequacies. ...

They were invariably preceded by a wild drinking bout. He was not an alcoholic or a heavy drinker in the commonly accepted sense of those words. But there were occasions when he would pour down Scotch and soda in a virtually mechanical motion in rhythm with the terrible tension building visibly within him and communicating itself to his listeners. The warning signs were unmistakable and those with past experience tried to get away before the inevitable flood of invective. As they found out, it was rarely possible.

[Reedy 56-57]

"As the 1960 campaign drew closer, the drinking bouts surpassed all previous records.... The 1960 campaign was a nightmare for the staff- a weird collage of beratings, occasional drunken prowls up and down hotel corridors, and frantic efforts to sober him up in the mornings so he could make the speaking engagements. Here again he came close to disaster. He spent a whole night in a hotel room in El Paso pouring invective upon the head of a bewildered advance man...On the stump he had very few peers. But in his rooms at night, the drinking patterns continued as did the threats of leaving the campaign." [Reedy, pp. 58-59]

"Someone had told him about the theories of subliminal conditioning then making the rounds and his methodology was to mutter "sincere" over and over in the presence of journalists. When he could insert the word into a sentence, he would do so even when it had to be dragged in by the heels, kicking and screaming. When he could find no sentence that was suitable, he would repeat "sincere" under his breath, over and over to the absolute bewilderment of his audience. Fortunately, he dropped the effort before articles could appear questioning his sanity."

[Reedy, p. 68]

"This occurred when he was vice president and obsessed with the idea that Bobby Kennedy was directing an anti-LBJ campaign. His elevation to the presidency made absolutely no difference. Brush after brush took place with the journalists who, in the early days of his administration, accepted him as a miracle worker to be treated with downright reverence. Eventually, however, his conviction that they were opposed to him created an opposition- always the outcome of paranoia. He did not attribute this to his own shortcomings but to the machinations of the man he regarded as his arch foe. At this stage of the game, Bobby was helpless to do him much mischief but LBJ still believed that there was a plot for which the press was the principal instrument." [Reedy, p. 70]

"In a very important sense, LBJ was a man who had been deprived of the normal joys of life. He knew how to struggle; he knew how to outfox political opponents; he knew how to make money; he knew how to swagger. But he did not know how to live. He had been programmed for business and for business only and outside of his programming he was lost." [Reedy, p. 81]

"I never fully understood this or other similar episodes. In the back of his mind, it is possible that he believed these visits were inspired by Bobby Kennedy as part of a "plot" to delete the name LBJ from the ticket in 1964. This had become an obsession with him- a conviction that peopled the world with agents of the president's brother all seeking to do him in. Someone- I never found out who- very actively fed this belief and kept him in a perpetual state of anxiety. This reached major proportions with the outbreak of the Billy Sol Estes and Bobby Baker scandals....

There was absolutely nothing to keep Johnson's name in the Billy Sol Estes story except the LBJ refusal to deal with the press. He covered up when there was nothing to cover and thereby created the suspicion that he was involved somehow. His reasoning was simple: The whole thing existed as a Bobby Kennedy plot and to talk about it to the press was to help Bobby Kennedy.

About the same thing happened in the Bobby Baker scandal except that in this instance he was really close to the central figure in the expose. He had considered Bobby as virtually a son and succeeded in promoting him to be secretary of the Senate Majority at an age when Bobby should have been in knee britches."

[Reedy 134-135]

"But Johnson refused to accept the obvious explanation. He insisted that it stayed in the press because of conscious pressure from Bobby Kennedy, who, he claimed, was holding daily briefings with the sole purpose of knifing LBJ in the back. He was so convinced of the existence of these meetings that I made a personal effort to check on them myself. There was not the least bit of evidence that they were taking place or had taken place. I am not a master spy but it is hardly likely that during that period the attorney general of the United States could have engaged in such an organized effort without one of my newspaper friends tipping me off.

This viewpoint did not impress Johnson in the slightest. He merely said I was "naive" and that he would demonstrate the truth to me. The next time the two of us were together with a correspondent, he lectured the man on how wrong it was to ask stooge questions and then said: "I know all about those briefings downtown." It became apparent at once the correspondent did not know not know about them but that did not stop LBJ. He continued his lectures to other correspondents- a practice that led to some speculation as to his mental stability. Fortunately, the speculation did not appear in print.

These episodes were merely ludicrious. Much more serious was his interpretation of all his relations with the administration as involved with "plots." He resisted- to the point of hysteria- the round-the-world trip which later became famous for his discovery of Bashir, the camel driver, in Karachi.... He raved, at least to me, that Bobby Kennedy was trying to set him up.

[Reedy, pp. 136-137]

"Those of us who had to deal with what few substantive matters characterized the vice presidency found it increasingly difficult to secure decisions from him. The consumption of booze increased as did the number of hours he would spend in bed at home just staring at the ceiling and growling at anyone who came into the room... There was some demon within the man himself that would have operated in any position short of the presidency."

[Reedy, pp. 139-140]

"Why Jack Kennedy offered Lyndon Johnson the vice presidency and why Lyndon Johnson accepted it, I will never know. Frankly, I doubt whether anyone will ever know now that the principal protagonists are dead. My guess is that it represented a shrewd political judgement on Kennedy's part."

[Reedy, p. 141]

"Behind the scenes, however, the campaign was grinding agony for a staff which felt a duty to the campaign to keep the seamy side from showing. There were some terrible moments- drunken, aimless wanderings through a hotel corridor in Chicago (fortunately blocked off by police) in which he tried to crawl into the bed of the female correspondent (I got the impression as we led him away that he was seeking comfort, not sex); a wild drinking bout in El Paso in which he spent the night cursing and raving at a good friend; continuous torrents of abuse directed at his staff. It was amazing to watch him go out in public and make truly compelling speeches off-the-cuff after such episodes."

[Reedy, p. 142]

"Whatever the reality, however, the LBJ paranoia continued to mount. He was convinced that Bobby Kennedy had virtual control over the nation's press and that this control was being used to pave the way for a "dump LBJ" campaign in 1964. This was a period in which he proceeded to "hang around" the outer offices of the White House- something like a precinct captain sitting in the anteroom of a ward leader hoping to be recognized. It was not a very propossessing sight and certainly not worthy of a man of his stature."

[Reedy, p. 147]

"He was not a man of thought and, instead, it became for him the period of intense misery. He obviously had not found what he had expected to find in the vice presidency, and while his intellect was keen, it was not of the variety that could grant him inner serenity. What could have been to a philosopher an era of growth was, in his eyes, a time of shame and failure.

[Reedy, p. 147]

"Johnson campaigned as though there were a real contest with the outcome in doubt. In time I came to understand that the act of campaigning had importance to him that was totally unrelated to the goals. There was some form of vitalizing force in frenzied crowds that drove him into a state of ectasy...

"What was even more interesting was the scene that invariably followed a session with a crowd. Despite his tapping technique, some people would always be able to grasp his palm for a fleeting moment. In such instances, it would be necessary for him to tear loose- leaving long scratches on the back of his hand. He loved those scratches. A medical attendant aboard Air Force One was ready with some soothing ointment for a gentle massage. LBJ would insist that everyone on the plane cluster around during the massage period and he would point lovingly to each scratch, describing in detail the person responsible for it. The first time I witnessed the performance, it seemed to me that he was thinking in terms of the Stigmata from the Cross. But the performance was much too sensual for such an interpretation. There was something post-orgasmic about the scene. A psychiatrist could have had a field day."

[Reedy, p. 152]

"The trouble was that Johnson himself became a victim of the Gulf of Tonkin resolution. It froze him into a totally uncompromising position where he had no alternatives- or thought he had no alternative- to feeding more and more draftees into the meat grinder. He had never, in his entire life, learned to confess error, and this quality- merely amusing or exasperating in a private person- resulted in cosmic tragedy for a president. He had to prove that he had been right all along. And this meant that he had to do more of what he had been doing despite the demonstrable failure of his Vietnam policies."

[Reedy, p. 165]

"There were a few key traits to his personality and it is unlikely that he shed them. As a human being he was a miserable person- a bully, sadist, lout and egoist. He had no sense of loyalty (despite his protestations that it was a quality that he valued above all others) and he enjoyed tormenting those who had done the most for him. He seemed to take a special delight in humiliating those who had cast their lot in with him. It may well be that this was the result of a form of self-loathing in which he concluded that there had to be something wrong with anyone who would associate with him."

[Reedy, p. 171]

"His lapses from civilized conduct were deliberate and usually intended to subordinate someone else to his will. He did disgusting things because he realized other people had to pretend that they did not mind. It was his method of bending them to his designs.

[Reedy, pp. 171-172]

Edited by Robert Morrow
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  • 3 years later...

I live in Austin, TX which is nice. I like to ask old people, people older than 65 what they thought about Lyndon Johnson. The man has no defenders. Almost universally people have anecdotes on how corrupt beyond belief Lyndon Johnson was. Even people who worked directly for him will tell you what a bastard he was. All the love in town is reserved for Lady Bird Johnson, who is considered a revered figure. Even the local Democrats shun Lyndon Johnson; their annual dinner is a "Ralph Yarborough" dinner. I remember one time I went to a nursing home, and one of the ladies there was one of LBJ's mistresses. Someone else told me that one of his requirements for secretaries was "Does she shuck her drawers."

Lyndon Johnson the man is an embarassment down here still. Nobody celebrates his birthday, or his death, or his "accomplishments" (murdering JFK, etc.); the media TV, radio, newspaper, Univ. of Texas are pretty much silent about the man. Nobody throws a big party in his honor such as a "Reagan Day" dinner. Talk to the Republicans, they will tell you LBJ was insanely corrupt. Talk to the Democrats, ditto. Lyndon Johnson in Austin, TX in the year 2010 is like an open herpes sore: no one wants to touch him!

.... now about Dallas ...

John Kennedy on 11/18/63 told George Smathers that Lyndon Johnson was making one of his absurd demands: that Jackie Kennedy ride with Lyndon Johnson in his car on the Texas trip. That right there is "smoking gun" evidence of Lyndon Johnson's participation in the JFK assassination. That is a clever, cunning psychopath in action. Lyndon Johnson knew that John Kennedy was going to be assassinated in a motorcade in Dallas, and out of a twisted sense of chivalry, is trying to get Jackie into the relative safety of his car and out of the kill zone.

Remember what LBJ told his beloved Mistress Madeleine in the morning of 11/22/63: That son-of-a-bitch crazy Yarborough and that goddamn f___king Irish mafia bastard Kennedy, will never embarass me again!" [Texas in the Morning, p. 167]

There is no need to give Lyndon Johnson "the benefit of the doubt" on anything and especially the JFK assassination. There is nothing that he did in his entire life to have earned that. Quite the contrary, read Caro's and Dallak's biographies and you run across mountains of examples of Johnson depraved, crooked and bizarre behavior. The anti-social whackjob in the JFK assassination was not LHO, but rather Lyndon Johnson himself, the usurper president! Bill Moyers and Richard Goodwin, 2 aides SEPARATELY went to see a psychiatrist inquiring about Lyndon Johnson's mental condition. Also, read George Reedy's book on LBJ - calls him a lout and a SADIST. That description from a 15 year aide. LBJ had a sick desire to break men. While at the time time the guy himself could barely function; he was a paranoid basket case (PROJECTING his evil intentions/tactics on others), smoking 3 packs of cigarettes a day and sucking down cases of low end Cutty Sark scotch.

Here is Lyndon Johnson talking through his aide Bill Moyers to get that "goddamned" bubble off JFK's car. Bill Moyers was on the phone from Austin, TX barking out these orders for the Secret Service in Dallas:

"Moyers had been on the phone with Ms. Harris, informing her that the President did not want the bubbletop. He told Harris to 'get that God-damned bubble off unless it's pouring rain.' Shortly thereafter the weather began to clear. Ms. Harris approached Sorrels about the bubble-top and together they had the agents remove the glass top."

[Phillip Nelson, LBJ: Mastermind of JFK's Assassination, p.428] Nelson's source for this quote is HSCA, Volume 11, p. 526.

Lyndon Johnson was also a control freak when he was in one of his manic periods, when he was pulling off one of his devious capers, machinations, he had dozens of them. Example would be President Lyndon Johnson calling Will Fritz on 11/23/63 and telling him to STOP his investigation, that he had the right man (patsy LHO). Another would be LBJ on 11/24/63 calling Parkland Hospital himself and personally talking to Dr. Charles Crenshaw and trying his best to get a confession out of the accused assassin (patsy) the dying Oswald.

Did not mean to forget Lyndon Johnson on literally the afternoon of 11/22/63 calling his financial advisor, saying he had to SELL HIS HALLIBURTION STOCK!

Pardon my asking, but what in the hell is going on in the mind of that man? Remember, LBJ has done nothing to earn "the benefit of the doubt" in his entire life. That is not the state of mind of a man worried about an "international conspiracy" or "nuclear war" or being killed by a hit squad on the loose. It is the state of mind of a man trying to think of all the ways he can of covering up his participation in the slaughter of the nation's president.

[From Family of Secrets by Russ Baker, p. 132]

Pat Holloway, former attorney to both Poppy Bush and Jack Crichton, recounted to me an incident involving LBJ that had greatly disturbed him. This was around 1PM on November 22, 1963, just as Kennedy was being pronounced dead. Holloway was heading home from the office and was passing through the reception area. The switchboard operator excitedly noted that she was patching the vice president through from Parkland Hospital to Holloway’s boss, firm senior partner Waddy Bullion, who was LBJ’s personal tax lawyer. The operator invited Holloway to listen in. LBJ was talking “not about a conspiracy or a tragedy,” Holloway recalled. “I heard him say: ‘Oh I gotta get rid of my goddamn Halliburton stock.’ Lyndon Johnson was talking about the consequences of his political problems with his Halliburton stock at a time when the president had been officially declared dead. And that pissed me off… It really made me furious.”

Then post assassination, Lyndon Johnson starts making "cowboy love" to Jackie, telling her he wants to be the "daddy" of Caroline and John-John.

From LBJ: Architect of American Ambition:

“During his first five weeks in office, Johnson called Jackie numerous times. Instinctively, awkwardly, he attempted to make what Hubert Humphrey referred to as “cowboy love” to her. A conversation the first week in December was typical: “Your picture was gorgeous. Now you had that chin up and that chest out and you looked so pretty marching in the front page of the New York Daily News … well,” LBJ said “I just came, sat in my desk and started signing a log of long things, and I decided to I wanted to flirt with you a little bit…. Darling, you know what I said to the Congress – I’d give anything in the world if I wasn’t here today … Tell Caroline and John-John I’d like to be their daddy!”

[LBJ: Architect of American Ambition, Randall Woods, p. 423]

That, my friend, is a CHAMPION psychopath in action. Lyndon Johnson slaughter's Jackie's husband, then he wants to be the "daddy" of Caroline and John-John. All the while telling Kennedy's staff "Ah need yew more than he ever did" to every one of them.

So what is a "psychopath?" A psychopath is someone who often looks "normal" sometimes even "charming" but there is something seriously wrong with them. They use people. They have no empathy. They are dangerous. Another psycopath would be Ted Bundy - volunteers at a suicide hotline - then its on to slaughtering coeds. How many markers of a psychopath does Lyndon Johnson display. Really? Let's see if Lyndon Johnson displays characteristics of a psychopath.

A psychopath will use people for excitement, entertainment, to build their self-esteem and they invariably value people in terms of their material value (e.g. money, property, comfort, etc..). They can involve and get other people into trouble quickly and they seem to have no regret for their actions. To date there is no checklist of behavior and symptoms that will tell you with certainty whether or not a person is a psychopath. But there are warning signs. The following warning signs are based on my experience but primarily research conducted by Robert Hare, Ph.D - the leading expert on the Psychopathic Personality.

http://www.crisiscounseling.com/articles/psychopath.htm

Characteristics of a Psychopath

1) superficial charm [LBJ would find a powerful person, then totally bootlick them.]

2) self-centered & self-important [100% LBJ]

3) need for stimulation & prone to boredom [Yes, hated to be alone]

4) deceptive behavior & lying [Possibly LBJ's #1 trait]

5) conning & manipulative [ LBJ not just conning, but "cunning" - master manipulator]

6) little remorse or guilt [how about killing the nanny Dale Turner? Is that ruthless enough for you?]

7) shallow emotional response [Yes.]

8) callous with a lack of empathy [besides lying, the other great trait of LBJ]

9) living off others or predatory attitude [God yes, like a jackal or hyena]

10) poor self-control [many examples of this]

11) promiscuous sexual behavior [Very promiscous. Bragged he had more women by accident than JFK had on purpose]

12) early behavioral problems [LBJ's grandmother PREDICTED he would go to jail.]

13) lack of realistic long term goals [Tell everyone for decades he was going to be President, (even if he had to kill to get there)]

14) impulsive lifestyle [impulsive, yes, but also a clever planner and manipulator]

15) irresponsible behavior [LBJ should have been executed by the state multiple times]

16) blaming others for their actions [Robert Kennedy was not the only one he hated]

17) short term relationships [Johnson had long term relationships; but if you threatened him, they got shorter real quick with a call to Mac Wallace]

18) juvenile delinquency [LBJ's grandmother PREDICTED he would go to jail.]

19) breaking parole or probation [Lyndon Johnson, too cunning, clever, ruthless and dangerous to go to jail! But he had to murder to cover up many things. He was not far away from jail.]

20) varied criminal activity [kickbacks, taking bribes, blackmailing, jury tampering, murder - A+ criminal. Should have been executed multiple times over.]

The idea that psychopaths eat people is a myth. In reality, a person with a psychopathic personality can lead what appears to be an ordinary life. They can have jobs, get married and they can break the law like anyone else. But their jobs and marriages usually don’t last and their life is usually on the verge of personal chaos. They are almost always in some kind of trouble or they are not far from it.

A psychopath is usually a subtle manipulator. They do this by playing to the emotions of others. They typically have high verbal intelligence, but they lack what is commonly referred to as "emotional intelligence". There is always a shallow quality to the emotional aspect of their stories. In particular they have difficulty describing how they felt, why they felt that way, or how others may feel and why. In many cases you almost have to explain it to them. Close friends and parents will often end up explaining to the psychopath how they feel and how others feel who have been hurt by him or her. They can do this over and over with no significant change in the person's choices and behavior. They don't understand or appreciate the impact that their behavior has on others. They do appreciate what it means when they are caught breaking rules or the law even though they seem to end up in trouble again. They desperately avoid incarceration and loss of freedom but continue to act as if they can get away with breaking the rules. They don't learn from these consequences. They seem to react with feelings and regret when they are caught. But their regret is not so much for other people as it is for the consequences that their behavior has had on them, their freedom, their resources and their so called "friends." They can be very sad for their self. A psychopath is always in it for their self even when it seems like they are caring for and helping others. The definition of their "friends" are people who support the psychopath and protect them from the consequence of their own antisocial behavior. Shallow friendships, low emotional intelligence, using people, antisocial attitudes and failure to learn from the repeated consequences of their choices and actions help identify the psychopath.

Sounds like he wasn't fooling anyone.

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