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I'm not sure which is more amazing: how much was known or how much wasn't known about President Kennedy's murder in February, 1964.

Saul Heller's acerbic essay that appeared in The Realist raised a lot of questions. Many of them have never been answered satisfactorily.

http://www.ep.tc/realist/47/13.html

I had not known that The Realist is online now. For anyone who (like me) is interested in early assassination criticism I would suggest you check out "The Unsinkable Marguerite Oswald," from the September 1964 issue.

http://www.ep.tc/realist/53/12.html

The issue contains some other interesting stuff, too. (See "The Crackpot and the Evidence" on page 4.) You can access its cover page by omitting the "12.html" from the above URL, then click through the issue page by page.

I called Paul Krassner when I was researching the early critics, because the copy I had of "Unsinkable" was truly horrid. He hinted that he had all issues up in his attic, or in storage, something like that -- accessible, but a major inconvenience for him to get to. Eventually I got a better copy from the UC Santa Barbara library's rare books room. But this online version is even cleaner.

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I'm not sure which is more amazing: how much was known or how much wasn't known about President Kennedy's murder in February, 1964.

Saul Heller's acerbic essay that appeared in The Realist raised a lot of questions. Many of them have never been answered satisfactorily.

http://www.ep.tc/realist/47/13.html

Not seen this one before: Enjoyed it, and thanks for posting.

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I'm not sure which is more amazing: how much was known or how much wasn't known about President Kennedy's murder in February, 1964.

Saul Heller's acerbic essay that appeared in The Realist raised a lot of questions. Many of them have never been answered satisfactorily.

http://www.ep.tc/realist/47/13.html

Not seen this one before: Enjoyed it, and thanks for posting.

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I'm not sure which is more amazing: how much was known or how much wasn't known about President Kennedy's murder in February, 1964.

Saul Heller's acerbic essay that appeared in The Realist raised a lot of questions. Many of them have never been answered satisfactorily.

http://www.ep.tc/realist/47/13.html

Not seen this one before: Enjoyed it, and thanks for posting.

You've made my day, Michael. Thanks for posting this!

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As with Rush to Judgment and RFK Must Die, I'm constantly shown how invaluable the early accounts (written within, say, three years) of a controversial event are to unearthing fact and presenting important contemporary context and opinion that can be lost during later investigation.

Edited by David Andrews
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Paul Krasner really is a funny guy.

He addressed a JFK event in the Village in NYC in the late 80s or early 90s.

John Judge and that guy Morningstar were there.

Around the same time Larry Flint was shot, and Flint, while recouperating, named Krasner editor of Hustler.

Krasner talked Flint into starting another radical, glossy mag called Rebel, which included JFK assassination articles by Mae Brussell and others.

It's really sad that the Realist is being cited as a source for honest JFK articles when it is meant to be satire.

I mean, do you really think LBJ screwed JFK in the throat on AF1 or that Earl Warren concluded JFK died of natural causes?

Where's Krasner now that we need him.

BK

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It's really sad that the Realist is being cited as a source for honest JFK articles when it is meant to be satire.

The article on Marguerite Oswald linked by John Kelin was written by Harold Feldman and is as honest as it gets. Not a speck of satire in it.

And the article that appeared a couple of months after the assassination by Saul Heller was serious and hard-hitting.

Did you read either of them?

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It's really sad that the Realist is being cited as a source for honest JFK articles when it is meant to be satire.

The article on Marguerite Oswald linked by John Kelin was written by Harold Feldman and is as honest as it gets. Not a speck of satire in it.

And the article that appeared a couple of months after the assassination by Saul Heller was serious and hard-hitting.

Did you read either of them?

Yes, I read them, and I read many of the other articles on the assassination when they first appeared in the Realist, and I think I still have an original copy of the Rebel with Mae's article on the Nazis and the assassintion.

I'm not saying the articles are meant to be satire, the magazine is.

BK

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  • 1 year later...

Paul Krasner really is a funny guy.

He addressed a JFK event in the Village in NYC in the late 80s or early 90s.

John Judge and that guy Morningstar were there.

Around the same time Larry Flint was shot, and Flint, while recouperating, named Krasner editor of Hustler.

Krasner talked Flint into starting another radical, glossy mag called Rebel, which included JFK assassination articles by Mae Brussell and others.

It's really sad that the Realist is being cited as a source for honest JFK articles when it is meant to be satire.

......Where's Krasner now that we need him.

Counter-Culture's Paul Krassner Nears 80

Aging Yippie Founder Still Mixes the Political With the Absurd

by Rex Weiner

April 1, 2012

http://forward.com/articles/153917/counter-cultures-paul-krassner-nears-/

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BK, can you give the dates of the mags, particularly Rebel, please?

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I'm not sure which is more amazing: how much was known or how much wasn't known about President Kennedy's murder in February, 1964.

Saul Heller's acerbic essay that appeared in The Realist raised a lot of questions. Many of them have never been answered satisfactorily.

http://www.ep.tc/realist/47/13.html

I had not known that The Realist is online now. For anyone who (like me) is interested in early assassination criticism I would suggest you check out "The Unsinkable Marguerite Oswald," from the September 1964 issue.

http://www.ep.tc/realist/53/12.html

The issue contains some other interesting stuff, too. (See "The Crackpot and the Evidence" on page 4.) You can access its cover page by omitting the "12.html" from the above URL, then click through the issue page by page.

I called Paul Krassner when I was researching the early critics, because the copy I had of "Unsinkable" was truly horrid. He hinted that he had all issues up in his attic, or in storage, something like that -- accessible, but a major inconvenience for him to get to. Eventually I got a better copy from the UC Santa Barbara library's rare books room. But this online version is even cleaner.

The article about Marguerite Oswald is really a fine article with many interesting insights. I highly recommend it.

DSL

4/2/12; 3:30 AM PDT

Los Angeles, California

Edited by David Lifton
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Paul Krasner really is a funny guy.

He addressed a JFK event in the Village in NYC in the late 80s or early 90s.

John Judge and that guy Morningstar were there.

Around the same time Larry Flint was shot, and Flint, while recouperating, named Krasner editor of Hustler.

Krasner talked Flint into starting another radical, glossy mag called Rebel, which included JFK assassination articles by Mae Brussell and others.

It's really sad that the Realist is being cited as a source for honest JFK articles when it is meant to be satire.

I mean, do you really think LBJ screwed JFK in the throat on AF1 or that Earl Warren concluded JFK died of natural causes?

Where's Krasner now that we need him.

BK

Yes, the Krasner article -- "The Parts that were Left Out of the Kennedy Book" (May, 1967, Realist)--was a brilliant satire. I say that because, to those of us who lived through that period--everyone was waiting with baited breath for the Manchester book, and, starting around the fall of 1966, there was a major court battle to stop the book, and a lawsuit filed by Jacqueline Kennedy.

So. .. : the whole world knew that, for whatever reason, certain things had been omitted. (And, of course, everyone was keenly interested in just what had been omitted).

So that was the ambience. Then the Manchester Book was serialized in four sections of LOOK Magazine (fall 1966) and then Manchester book itself was published--early April, 1967. So. . Krasner's timing was perfect.

Along comes this article--bearing the title it did--and at a time when Lyndon Johnson was thought of as a xxxx and a war monger, and just about capable of anything. Into that environment stepped Krasner with this article that --with this last item--strained credulity, but. . when you've got a president who was asking cabinet members to come in and speak with him while he was on the toilet, believe me, folks thought anything was possible.

And that's what was amazing about that piece: many people indeed wondered. . "What if. . " and "Is this possible? "

If you will go two issues forward in the Realist, you will find Krasner summing up some of the feedback he got, as a result of this "crazy" article.

Finally, as he himself related over a decade later in an interview in OUIE magazine: BEST EVIDENCE was published, and there, in Chapter 11, was laid out the evidence that, between Dallas and Bethesda, the throat wound was enlarged.

Even Krasner, at that point, could only shake his head in disbelief. That the satire he had created dealt with an issue that was very real indeed.

Everyone knows that a joke is not funny once it has to be explained. And the same goes for this particular item.

All I can tell you is that it was a barometer of the times that a substantial percentage of people did not realize this item was a satire.

DSL

4/2/12; 3:50 AM PDT

Los Angeles, California

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