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Spartacus and New World Order


Jack White
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I am curious why the name of this website is Spartacus, given that:

May 1, 1776 – Adam Weishaupt (code named Spartacus) establishes a secret society called the Order of the Illuminati.

Weishaupt is the Professor of Canon Law at the University of Ingolstadt in Bavaria, part of Germany. The Illuminati seek to

establish a New World Order.

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I presume what Jack is talking about is this website:

http://www.spartacus.schoolnet.co.uk/

of which John Simkin is an administrator. Both websites being to do with education and research, IMO naturally John promotes the Spartacus website on this Forum and they have many links to each other.

John talks about it briefly on the Spartacus website:

...In September, 1997 I established the Spartacus Educational website and over the next six years I produced online material for the Electronic Telegraph, the European Virtual School and the Guardian's educational website, Learn.

In 2003 I joined Andy Walker in establishing the International Education Forum....

John talks about the creation of that website in this video:

It's also worth reviewing this post from John:

http://educationforum.ipbhost.com/index.php?showtopic=14334

Whilst we are talking about Spartacus references, I would think this describes why it might be called that:

"Spartacus' struggle, often seen as oppressed people fighting for their freedom against a slave-owning aristocracy, has found new meaning for modern writers since the 19th century."

Giving people an information source, to enable debate and dissent, is a wonderful tool to battle those who would oppress. It could explain why John is so passionate about allowing all viewpoints to be expressed on the EF, even those he vehemently disagrees with.

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I presume what Jack is talking about is this website:

http://www.spartacus.schoolnet.co.uk/

of which John Simkin is an administrator. Both websites being to do with education and research, IMO naturally John promotes the Spartacus website on this Forum and they have many links to each other.

John talks about it briefly on the Spartacus website:

...In September, 1997 I established the Spartacus Educational website and over the next six years I produced online material for the Electronic Telegraph, the European Virtual School and the Guardian's educational website, Learn.

In 2003 I joined Andy Walker in establishing the International Education Forum....

John talks about the creation of that website in this video:

It's also worth reviewing this post from John:

http://educationforum.ipbhost.com/index.php?showtopic=14334

Whilst we are talking about Spartacus references, I would think this describes why it might be called that:

"Spartacus' struggle, often seen as oppressed people fighting for their freedom against a slave-owning aristocracy, has found new meaning for modern writers since the 19th century."

Giving people an information source, to enable debate and dissent, is a wonderful tool to battle those who would oppress. It could explain why John is so passionate about allowing all viewpoints to be expressed on the EF, even those he vehemently disagrees with.

Thank you Evan for providing the info about which website that Jack did not. Last I checked, this website was named "The Education Forum". Good to know that my memory wasn't failing me. Although I'm still at a loss to see how someone might think the Spartacus reference is to an obscure code name rather than the much older and more well known ancient story.

Edited by Matthew Lewis
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Lewis needs to brush up on his "Greek mythology". Wikipedia says in part:

"The ancient sources agree that Spartacus was a Thracian. Plutarch describes him as "a Thracian of Nomadic stock".[2] Appian says he was "a Thracian by birth, who had once served as a soldier with the Romans, but had since been a prisoner and sold for a Gladiator".[3] Florus (2.8.8) described him as one "who from Thracian mercenary, had become a Roman soldier, of a soldier a deserter and robber, and afterwards, from consideration of his strength, a gladiator".[4] Some authors refer to the Thracian tribe of the Maedi,[5] which in historic times occupied the area on the southwestern fringes of Thrace (present day south-western Bulgaria).[6] Plutarch also writes that Spartacus's wife, a prophetess of the same tribe, was enslaved with him."

Hmmmmm...a Bulgarian deserter from the Roman army who became a robber. Nice credentials.

Jack

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I am curious why the name of this website is Spartacus, given that:

May 1, 1776 – Adam Weishaupt (code named Spartacus) establishes a secret society called the Order of the Illuminati.

Weishaupt is the Professor of Canon Law at the University of Ingolstadt in Bavaria, part of Germany. The Illuminati seek to

establish a New World Order.

You've nailed him at last Jack.

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Lewis needs to brush up on his "Greek mythology". Wikipedia says in part:

So what? Does it change the POINT that more would know of that name than some obscure code name? I looked briefly at the Wiki entry and saw the word Greek first. Again doesn't change my POINT.

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Lewis needs to brush up on his "Greek mythology". Wikipedia says in part:

"The ancient sources agree that Spartacus was a Thracian. Plutarch describes him as "a Thracian of Nomadic stock".[2] Appian says he was "a Thracian by birth, who had once served as a soldier with the Romans, but had since been a prisoner and sold for a Gladiator".[3] Florus (2.8.8) described him as one "who from Thracian mercenary, had become a Roman soldier, of a soldier a deserter and robber, and afterwards, from consideration of his strength, a gladiator".[4] Some authors refer to the Thracian tribe of the Maedi,[5] which in historic times occupied the area on the southwestern fringes of Thrace (present day south-western Bulgaria).[6] Plutarch also writes that Spartacus's wife, a prophetess of the same tribe, was enslaved with him."

Hmmmmm...a Bulgarian deserter from the Roman army who became a robber. Nice credentials.

Jack

Jack once again displays his

1) ignorance (didn't know who Spartacus was)

2) ability to miss the obvious AND

3) tendency to cherry pick. From the 1st paragraph of his source, the Wikipedia article:

Spartacus ( Greek: Σπάρτακος; Latin: Spartacus[1]) (c. 109–71 BC) was the most notable leader of the slaves in the Third Servile War, a major slave uprising against the Roman Republic. Little is known about Spartacus beyond the events of the war, and surviving historical accounts are sometimes contradictory and may not always be reliable.

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