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Key Evidence of Conspiracy?


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This continues from the thread "Strongest Piece of Evidence" where David Williams was asking people's opinion of what evidence convinced people of a conspiracy, "one piece per person please," a discussion arose about the lunchroom encounter. In an attempt to leave the thread to its intended purpose, and before that discussion spins off to a topic of its own, overwhelming the original one, I'm continuing it here, picking up in the next message where it left off.

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Great. Here we go from the previous thread. More added after:

For me the strongest piece of evidence that Oswald is innocent of being the Sixth Floor Sniper is the alleged encouter in the Second Floor lunchroom between Officer Marion Baker, Roy Truly and Oswald within a minute and a half after the last shot.

http://educationforu...opic=15429&st=0

While the official story has Oswald hiding the rifle and descending the stairs and Baker seeing Oswald enter through the lunchroom's south door window, a more detailed analysis, as the Secret Service did when they tried to Re-enact the assassination, shows that Baker saw Oswald through a closed door.

As Baker relates, he saw Oswald through the door window moving from the right to the left in the vestibule entering the lunchroom.

Since the door had an automatic closing device, and if the door was open or ajar even a few inches, the rectangular window naturally gets smaller as seen from the position where Baker was by the stairs. If Oswald had gone through that door, the door would probably have still been open a little bit, and Oswald couldn't have been seen by Baker through the window.

In addition, if Oswald had gone through that door, Roy Truly, who was ahead of Baker on the way up the stairs, most certainly would have seen Oswald and an open door, but he didn't.

In addition, if Oswald had gone down those stairs from the Sixth floor to the Second floor, he would have had to encouter Jack Dougherty on the fifth floor by the stairs, and the two secretaries who descended from the fourth floor to the first floor, but they didn't encounter anyone.

There is another south side door to the vestibule of the Second floor lunchroom, that leads to the same location, and it is this south door that Oswald had used to enter the vestibule so that he could be seen walking past the west door window, as Baker saw him.

Since Baker and Truly encountered Oswald in the lunchroom less than a minute and a half after the last shot, Oswald couldn't have fired that shot, deposited the rifle and made it down the stairs past Dougherty, the two secretaries and Truly without any of them seeing him, and for Baker to see him in the vestibule through that west door window, he had to have entered it from the south door, coming from the offices, the rest room or the first floor steps, the same way he left a few minutes later.

The Secret Service stoped their reenactment at that point, with the last photo of the reenactment photo sequence being the photos of the door as seen from Baker's position.

They recognized the significance of this as well since they called Truly back for a second round of questioning but only asked him one question - did that door have an automatic closing device? Yes it did.

And the door was closed when Baker saw Oswald walking in from the south door, not the west door, so he didn't come down those stairs and wasn't the Sixth Floor Sniper.

Further support for this is provided by Ms. Mooneyham, the court clerk from across the street who saw a man in the Sixth Floor window four to five minutes after the last shot - and that person, who was apparently moving boxes around, was certainly not Oswald, and if he wasn't the sniper, had to have seen him and was most certainly an accomplice.

I don't know who the Sixth Floor Sniper was, but if you believe Baker, Truly and Oswald and the circumstances they say they met, then it wasn't Oswald.

I'm willing to be convinced otherwise, but it better be good.

Well that's my two cents.

BK

http://jfkcountercou...-copa-2010.html

Bill,

This doesn't account for Baker's original first-day affidavit nor the statement that O.V. Campbell made to the press regarding seeing Oswald in a utility cupboard on the first floor shortly after Baker and Truly had entered the building.

There was another reason for the change in Baker's affidavit that took the encounter from the 3rd or 4th floor down to the 2nd. I just don't know what it is. Baker states that the man he ran into was walking away from the stairs (no mention of doors, cokes and lunchrooms) was in his thirties and wearing a light brown jacket. Backed up by the witnesses outside the TSBD who saw a man in the window.

If the Jack Revill TSBD list was made in the TSBD by speaking to employees and William Shelley then there is evidence that Oswald possibly gave the officers his name and address before leaving and was vouched for by somebody. Truly claims he vouched for Oswald to Baker but perhaps the vouching didn't take place on the 2nd floor. What if the vouching took place on the first floor around 12:45pm and it resulted in Oswald being let loose?

Truly moving the encounter to the lunchroom served a purpose. As did Baker reinforcing it by changing his recollections. What was it?

Lee

I'm well aware that Baker's first report places the encounter on the fourth floor, but I also think, based on everything I can learn about him and his filmed interviews, that he appears to be a good cop that wouldn't lie to fit a cover story, and what I am using as evidence is the evidence used by the WC to frame Oswald - and all three - Baker, Truly and Oswald agree that the encounter occured in the lunchroom which is on the second floor by the coke machine.

Now if you look at the youtube of Baker, he says that he saw Oswald "walking away" from him but he saw him through the window in the door. If Oswald had gone through that door, he wouldn't have seen him at all because the door would have been partially open and Oswald would have made the left and not have been visible through the window, and if Oswald had gone through that door, Truly would have surely seen him and didn't.

Now you don't want to believe Baker, Truly or Oswald then there's nothing to believe.

I believe Baker and I believe the encounter took place, and I believe the door was closed and Baker saw Oswald in the vestibule through the window moving from right to left into the lunchroom and Baker followed him there.

Everybody has thresholds of belief, and what will change their minds, but to me this is the key that exonerates Oswald from being the Sixth Floor Sniper, and the quest to find someone else who did that shooting, someone who also had a reason for being in the building at the time, someone who either stayed behind and calmly moved boxes around (as seen by Ms. Mooneyham and confirmed by the Dillard/Powell photos), or somebody who was an acomplace to the shooter who did leave immediately, but still wasn't Oswald.

In order to understand the reasoning behind all this you must read the first thread and the chapter in the book that I reference - Michael Roffman's Presumed Guilty, who first recognized this point.

Howard Roffman.

Thank you Todd.

But you're taking Duke's job.

How do you get around Roffman's work?

Gary Mack says that Oswald just went down the steps quickly and just missed Dougherty and the two secretaries, like the Keystone Cops.

Howard Roffman went on to become the personal secretary to a major motion picture director and to publish a photo book of gay couples.

BK

Bill.

One thing is that Roffman made a mistake in his analysis of the Couch film. He says that Baker is not visible running to the TSBD when in fact he is. The result of his error was putting Baker into the TSBD too quickly.

Dougherty's testimony is a mess. I suspect he was headed to or on the elevator going down when LHO passed the 5th floor landing.

The two secretaries went down after LHO.

Todd

So how did Oswald go through that door and not be seen by Truly, ahead of Baker.

And if Baker saw Oswald through the window, then the door must have been closed.

And if Oswald was with Baker and Truly in the lunchroom, who did Ms. Mooneyham see in the Sixth Floor sniper's nest a minute later?

How do you get past those three facts?

BK

Look, the fact that the two secretaries were so anathema to the WC that the COmmission, or someone, altered their testimony, is all you need to know on this issue.

Todd, and others like VIncent Bugliosi, don't like Dougherty's testimony. He is bad for them on Oswald's alibi, and he is bad on the "no bag" issue. So they try and discredit the guy.

He was either standing where he said he was or not. If you can impeach him, fine. Do it.

But the problem is this: if you cannot, then his testimony becomes part of a mosaic. Because there is much more evidence to support him on both issues than there is the official story.

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Most of this general discussion is moot: people argue minutiae without any basis other than arguing against evidence that hasn't been given any foundation. Why discuss the question of whether Oswald could have run down four double-flights of stairs and into the lunchroom before Baker & Truly got there if it hasn't been proven that he was ever four flights up to run down from in the first place?

It's as ridiculous as arguing about Oswald's movements after having shot Officer Tippit after establishing that Oswald couldn't have run 9/10 of a mile in four or five minutes to shoot Tippit in the first place: if he wasn't there, then what is the point of arguing how he left?!? First, someone needs to actually put Oswald up there, and nobody has ever done that. So what's all this talk about his leaving?!?

The evidence and testimony that we're aware of leans much more toward him not being than than being there. The latter consists of "his" gun being there, and nobody else having seen him, apparently, during the crucial moments when he's alleged to have been shooting JFK; the last time he'd been seen on those upper floors was a full 35 minutes before, by which time he could have been anywhere else in or even out of Dallas. In the meantime, he was also seen downstairs at lunch time by at least one other TSBD worker, and himself saw two other co-workers exactly where they themselves had said they were.

Oh, and there's a fingerprint on a box of books. And one on a bag that's questionable at best, and probably legally inadmissible at trial at worst. And another "hidden" on a rifle that's otherwise devoid of any prints, anywhere.

So, other than enough circumstantial evidence to suggest that he was there as the shooter, all there is left to convict him is the incredulous question, "well, who else could it have been?!?" Lacking an answer to that, the "obvious" answer is that it "must" have been none other than Lee Harvey Oswald.

The evidence and testimony that exculpates him is much lengthier, and every bit as hard to refute as the question of "who else" could've done it. Among the most difficult is the question of why the four other men who were unquestionably on the fifth and sixth floors during the lead-in time to the assassination, including one within 20 feet for up until within five minutes or less of the shooting, and one who could only have been sent sprawling in the aftermath, did not see nor hear the assassin even despite a complete and utter lack of fear for identifying him.

After all, Lee Oswald was dead by the time their Warren Commission testimony was given; he wasn't about to rise from the grave to exact his revenge on them for their throwing him under the bus.

And given the fact that Oswald was dead by then, why didn't they just say that they'd seen and/or heard him? Much of this discussion wouldn't even be taking place if they had. But they didn't.

I submit that the reason that they didn't is because, whether they actually liked Oswald or not, they knew beyond any doubt he didn't do it and weren't going to lie about a man who couldn't defend himself; but on the other hand, the actual shooter(s) not being dead, they weren't about to volunteer any information that might cause them or theirs any difficulties down the road.

As equally valid a scenario as the presumed Oswald-did-it theory - it is NOT an established fact - is that either Bonnie Ray Williams stumbled upon the shooter(s) or they stumbled upon him (I tend toward the latter) while he was having his "checken-on-the-bone sandwich" and drinking his Dr Pepper; when Junior Jarman and Hank Norman arrived on the fifth floor and making noise, they effectively saved Bonnie Ray's life (one dead body by an escaping assassin is credible; three much less so), who was instead herded downstairs on the east elevator and told them about the shooter(s) upstairs, said "herding" of Williams and preventing any of them from leaving by standing in the stairwell by the elevators (where he should have heard or seen if not actually been run over by the supposedly-escaping Oswald) accomplished by the "great big husky fellow" who helped the shooter(s) into the building and upstairs, as well as down and out, Jack Dougherty.

That scenario can be constructed every bit as solidly as the Oswald-did-it scenario using the exact same reasoning and a bit more evidence, save only fingerprints (maybe), as can the escape from the upper floors, apparently undetected (apparently, but maybe not actually). Such a scenario will undoubtedly earn the scorn of the LN crowd, no more or less than is heaped upon their favorite theory, even if a bit more derisively, since only their theory bears the imprimatur of a government "investigation" and an official conclusion.

Which all rests on "well, who else could it have been?" and supported by the fact that the government always gets it right.

How and when Oswald got into the second floor lunchroom? Unless it can be proved that he came down from the sixth floor, it doesn't really much matter, does it.

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SIX THINGS MADE TO ORDER FOR LEE HARVEY OSWALD

It's time for conspiracy theorists to wake up from their lengthy slumber

and realize that there's no credible evidence of anyone having shot and

killed President Kennedy and Dallas Police Officer J.D. Tippit except a

screwball named Lee Harvey Oswald, a 24-year-old nuthatch who was

lucky enough (from his warped point-of-view) to have these six things

all align themselves into perfect harmony on November 22, 1963:

1.) He (Oswald) hated America and its Government's representatives.

2.) Oswald owned and had ready access to a rifle in November '63.

3.) Oswald worked in a building which just happened to overlook the

last portion of JFK's motorcade route through Dallas on 11/22/63.

4.) It stopped raining prior to 12:00 noon on 11/22/63 (hence, the

bubbletop roof was left off of JFK's limousine for the motorcade drive

through Dallas). The bubbletop roof was not bulletproof at all, but

it's quite possible that Oswald wouldn't have known that fact on

November 22nd. Seeing the roof in place that day, if it continued to

rain, just might have made Oswald think twice about firing those

gunshots at the limo.

5.) Oswald was lucky enough to have President Kennedy visit Dallas on

a Friday (i.e., a regular workday for Lee Oswald and the other Book

Depository employees), instead of, say, a Saturday or a Sunday.

6.) Another small item that relates to #5 above is something that

could well have played a very big factor in Oswald pulling off the

shooting that Friday -- and that is the fact that not only did

Kennedy's visit to Dallas occur on a workday for Oswald (a Friday),

but the parade route took JFK's limo past the Book Depository Building

RIGHT AT LUNCHTIME as well, which meant that most TSBD employees were

on their normal lunch breaks at that hour of the day (and would have

been even if Kennedy had not been scheduled to drive by the building

at noontime).

The normal time for the warehouse employees to break for lunch at the

Depository was from 12:00 Noon to 12:45 PM, just exactly the time

period when President Kennedy was scheduled to drive through Dealey

Plaza on Friday, November 22nd. That information was confirmed via the

Warren Commission testimony of Buell Wesley Frazier (the 19-year-old

who drove Oswald to work on the morning of the assassination):

WESLEY FRAZIER -- "12 o'clock is when we always eat lunch."

JOSEPH BALL -- "12 to 12:45?"

FRAZIER -- "Right."

http://history-matters.com/archive/jfk/wc/wcvols/wh2/html/WC_Vol2_0109b.htm

This meant fewer people staying on the upper Depository floors (i.e.,

the "warehouse" floors, which were floors 5, 6, and 7), with those

employees going down to the first-floor "Domino/Lunch Room" or the

second-floor lunch room (or going outside the building to watch the

President pass by) during the exact time when Lee Oswald would require

a VACANT sixth floor in his preparations for shooting the President

during this Friday lunch period.

For Oswald, the above combination of things was simply a made-to-order

combination of factors that just fell into his lap on November 22nd,

1963, including item numbers 4, 5, and 6 mentioned above, which are

things that Oswald HIMSELF could not possibly have had any control

over whatsoever. And even #3 as well, to the extent that Oswald was

hired at the TSBD on October 15, 1963, which was a full month prior to

anyone officially announcing the details of JFK's final motorcade

route through Dallas (which included the turn onto Elm Street in front

of the Depository).

Happenstance (and a kook named Lee Harvey) got John F. Kennedy killed.

Not conspiracy.

David Von Pein

January 2008

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SIX THINGS MADE TO ORDER FOR LEE HARVEY OSWALD

It's time for conspiracy theorists to wake up from their lengthy slumber

and realize that there's no credible evidence of anyone having shot and

killed President Kennedy and Dallas Police Officer J.D. Tippit except a

screwball named Lee Harvey Oswald, a 24-year-old nuthatch who was

lucky enough (from his warped point-of-view) to have these six things

all align themselves into perfect harmony on November 22, 1963:

1.) He (Oswald) hated America and its Government's representatives.

2.) Oswald owned and had ready access to a rifle in November '63.

3.) Oswald worked in a building which just happened to overlook the

last portion of JFK's motorcade route through Dallas on 11/22/63.

4.) It stopped raining prior to 12:00 noon on 11/22/63 (hence, the

bubbletop roof was left off of JFK's limousine for the motorcade drive

through Dallas). The bubbletop roof was not bulletproof at all, but

it's quite possible that Oswald wouldn't have known that fact on

November 22nd. Seeing the roof in place that day, if it continued to

rain, just might have made Oswald think twice about firing those

gunshots at the limo.

5.) Oswald was lucky enough to have President Kennedy visit Dallas on

a Friday (i.e., a regular workday for Lee Oswald and the other Book

Depository employees), instead of, say, a Saturday or a Sunday.

6.) Another small item that relates to #5 above is something that

could well have played a very big factor in Oswald pulling off the

shooting that Friday -- and that is the fact that not only did

Kennedy's visit to Dallas occur on a workday for Oswald (a Friday),

but the parade route took JFK's limo past the Book Depository Building

RIGHT AT LUNCHTIME as well, which meant that most TSBD employees were

on their normal lunch breaks at that hour of the day (and would have

been even if Kennedy had not been scheduled to drive by the building

at noontime).

The normal time for the warehouse employees to break for lunch at the

Depository was from 12:00 Noon to 12:45 PM, just exactly the time

period when President Kennedy was scheduled to drive through Dealey

Plaza on Friday, November 22nd. That information was confirmed via the

Warren Commission testimony of Buell Wesley Frazier (the 19-year-old

who drove Oswald to work on the morning of the assassination):

WESLEY FRAZIER -- "12 o'clock is when we always eat lunch."

JOSEPH BALL -- "12 to 12:45?"

FRAZIER -- "Right."

http://history-matters.com/archive/jfk/wc/wcvols/wh2/html/WC_Vol2_0109b.htm

This meant fewer people staying on the upper Depository floors (i.e.,

the "warehouse" floors, which were floors 5, 6, and 7), with those

employees going down to the first-floor "Domino/Lunch Room" or the

second-floor lunch room (or going outside the building to watch the

President pass by) during the exact time when Lee Oswald would require

a VACANT sixth floor in his preparations for shooting the President

during this Friday lunch period.

For Oswald, the above combination of things was simply a made-to-order

combination of factors that just fell into his lap on November 22nd,

1963, including item numbers 4, 5, and 6 mentioned above, which are

things that Oswald HIMSELF could not possibly have had any control

over whatsoever. And even #3 as well, to the extent that Oswald was

hired at the TSBD on October 15, 1963, which was a full month prior to

anyone officially announcing the details of JFK's final motorcade

route through Dallas (which included the turn onto Elm Street in front

of the Depository).

Happenstance (and a kook named Lee Harvey) got John F. Kennedy killed.

Not conspiracy.

David Von Pein

January 2008

ahh, David, this is quite beyond you, might want to forward a link for this thread to Vin Bugliosi. :ice

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It's time for conspiracy theorists to wake up from their lengthy slumber

and realize that there's no credible evidence of anyone having shot and

killed President Kennedy and Dallas Police Officer J.D. Tippit except a

screwball named Lee Harvey Oswald, a 24-year-old nuthatch who was

lucky enough (from his warped point-of-view) to have these six things

all align themselves into perfect harmony on November 22, 1963:

1.) He (Oswald) hated America and its Government's representatives.

Sure looks like it. He wrote to his brother Robert from Moscow that "In the event of war I would kill any American who put a uniform on in defense of the American Government – Any American."

Coincidentally, that same year, William Morgan stated that he would "kill any American Marines" who attempted to invade Cuba or to interfere with Castro's objectives. Morgan was a CIA agent.

2.) Oswald owned and had ready access to a rifle in November '63.

Sure. Except the evidence he owned one is muddy at best, and he had talked of obtaining a gun in September – which would be a redundant purchase if he "already owned and had ready access to one". I would also like to know how is it that Det. Rose described the blanket the rifle had been wrapped in as shaped like a rifle (so much so that he had to step on it to see if the rifle was still inside) and that RD Lewis described the paper wrapping as looking like a rifle case – and yet neither Ruth nor Michael Paine (who even handled the damn thing), had any thought that it was indeed, a rifle? It does not compute. Someone is lying here. Either the rifle & wrapping held the shape of a rifle and therefore the Paines knew exactly what was inside, or it held something that could not be easily mistaken for a rifle – and was not rifle-shaped, thus explaining Ruth & Michael's non concern with it.

3.) Oswald worked in a building which just happened to overlook the

last portion of JFK's motorcade route through Dallas on 11/22/63.

Thomas Vallee just happened to work in a building which overlooked the Chicago parade route.

Russell McLarry just happened to work in a building on the parade route 3 blocks from the Dallas Trade Mart. McLarry was arrested after the assassination because on Nov 21, he had threated to shoot Kennedy from his place of employment the next day.

4.) It stopped raining prior to 12:00 noon on 11/22/63 (hence, the

bubbletop roof was left off of JFK's limousine for the motorcade drive

through Dallas).

Proving this conspiracy goes all the up to the top... angel1.gif

The bubbletop roof was not bulletproof at all, but

it's quite possible that Oswald wouldn't have known that fact on

November 22nd. Seeing the roof in place that day, if it continued to

rain, just might have made Oswald think twice about firing those

gunshots at the limo.

5.) Oswald was lucky enough to have President Kennedy visit Dallas on

a Friday (i.e., a regular workday for Lee Oswald and the other Book

Depository employees), instead of, say, a Saturday or a Sunday.

If the trip had been on a weekend, you don't think Oswald could have committed the crime?

Think about what you saying here: the TSBD was integral to the assassination plot.

6.) Another small item that relates to #5 above is something that

could well have played a very big factor in Oswald pulling off the

shooting that Friday -- and that is the fact that not only did

Kennedy's visit to Dallas occur on a workday for Oswald (a Friday),

but the parade route took JFK's limo past the Book Depository Building

RIGHT AT LUNCHTIME as well, which meant that most TSBD employees were

on their normal lunch breaks at that hour of the day (and would have

been even if Kennedy had not been scheduled to drive by the building

at noontime).

Would have been at lunch – and most were – including Oswald.

The normal time for the warehouse employees to break for lunch at the

Depository was from 12:00 Noon to 12:45 PM, just exactly the time

period when President Kennedy was scheduled to drive through Dealey

Plaza on Friday, November 22nd. That information was confirmed via the

Warren Commission testimony of Buell Wesley Frazier (the 19-year-old

who drove Oswald to work on the morning of the assassination):

WESLEY FRAZIER -- "12 o'clock is when we always eat lunch."

JOSEPH BALL -- "12 to 12:45?"

FRAZIER -- "Right."

http://history-matte..._Vol2_0109b.htm

This meant fewer people staying on the upper Depository floors (i.e.,

the "warehouse" floors, which were floors 5, 6, and 7), with those

employees going down to the first-floor "Domino/Lunch Room" or the

second-floor lunch room (or going outside the building to watch the

President pass by) during the exact time when Lee Oswald would require

a VACANT sixth floor in his preparations for shooting the President

during this Friday lunch period.

For Oswald, the above combination of things was simply a made-to-order

combination of factors that just fell into his lap on November 22nd,

1963, including item numbers 4, 5, and 6 mentioned above, which are

things that Oswald HIMSELF could not possibly have had any control

over whatsoever.

Correct emphasis – and correct to talk about control instead of coincidence.

And even #3 as well, to the extent that Oswald was

hired at the TSBD on October 15, 1963, which was a full month prior to

anyone officially announcing the details of JFK's final motorcade

route through Dallas (which included the turn onto Elm Street in front

of the Depository).

Since the local elites were never going to allow it to be anywhere but the Trade Mart, it was always a given what the route would be. Talking about when it was made official, or when it was made public is just a red herring.

Happenstance (and a kook named Lee Harvey) got John F. Kennedy killed.

Not conspiracy.

And your evidence is? Nothing. All you can do is write a bunch of evidence-free twaddle in an attempt to pass it off as established fact.

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SIX THINGS MADE TO ORDER FOR LEE HARVEY OSWALD

It's time for conspiracy theorists to wake up from their lengthy slumber and realize that there's no credible evidence of anyone having shot and killed President Kennedy and Dallas Police Officer J.D. Tippit except a screwball named Lee Harvey Oswald, a 24-year-old nuthatch who was lucky enough (from his warped point-of-view) to have these six things all align themselves into perfect harmony on November 22, 1963:

That's inference; where's the evidence?

Is this how Americans perceive their justice system? "He wouldn't ever have been arrested if he hadn't done it!"

1) He yelled at his wife and didn't like her parents.

2) There were knives in the kitchen drawer, and he knew it (he even bought them!).

3) He lived in the house where she was killed.

4) It was dark when he got home that day.

5) She came home on a Friday, when she wouldn't be missed at work the next day.

6) Another small factor: nobody thought his car in the driveway was suspicious.

Because nobody said they saw another person enter the house and there were no fingerprints identified with someone else (there were some we couldn't identify and some not right next to the bed, which we're sure had nothing at all to do with this crime), the only possible conclusion, the obvious solution to the crime is that the husband did it.

Since anything the defense might offer this court is only bound to be wishful thinking and speculation, sprinkled liberally with baseless paranoia, your honor, I move we dispense with the trial and appeals and execute the perpetrator right here and now.

And lest the court feel that justice would not be served, your honor, I have affidavits here from 11 other prosecutors who all agree with me, obviating the need for a jury.

It works in other parts of the world; I can't imagine why it wouldn't work here.

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It's time for conspiracy theorists to wake up from their lengthy slumber

and realize that there's no credible evidence of anyone having shot and

killed President Kennedy and Dallas Police Officer J.D. Tippit except a

screwball named Lee Harvey Oswald, a 24-year-old nuthatch who was

lucky enough (from his warped point-of-view) to have these six things

all align themselves into perfect harmony on November 22, 1963:

BK: Dave, Did the screwball, 24-year-old-nuthatch, make that lucky nuthatch,

with wharped-point-of-view arrange for this perfet harmony?

1.) He (Oswald) hated America and its Government's representatives.

Sure looks like it. He wrote to his brother Robert from Moscow that "In the event of war I would kill any American who put a uniform on in defense of the American Government – Any American."

Coincidentally, that same year, William Morgan stated that he would "kill any American Marines" who attempted to invade Cuba or to interfere with Castro's objectives. Morgan was a CIA agent.

2.) Oswald owned and had ready access to a rifle in November '63.

Sure. Except the evidence he owned one is muddy at best, and he had talked of obtaining a gun in September – which would be a redundant purchase if he "already owned and had ready access to one". I would also like to know how is it that Det. Rose described the blanket the rifle had been wrapped in as shaped like a rifle (so much so that he had to step on it to see if the rifle was still inside) and that RD Lewis described the paper wrapping as looking like a rifle case – and yet neither Ruth nor Michael Paine (who even handled the damn thing), had any thought that it was indeed, a rifle? It does not compute. Someone is lying here. Either the rifle & wrapping held the shape of a rifle and therefore the Paines knew exactly what was inside, or it held something that could not be easily mistaken for a rifle – and was not rifle-shaped, thus explaining Ruth & Michael's non concern with it.

3.) Oswald worked in a building which just happened to overlook the

last portion of JFK's motorcade route through Dallas on 11/22/63.

Thomas Vallee just happened to work in a building which overlooked the Chicago parade route.

Russell McLarry just happened to work in a building on the parade route 3 blocks from the Dallas Trade Mart. McLarry was arrested after the assassination because on Nov 21, he had threated to shoot Kennedy from his place of employment the next day.

BK: I'd like to add the parking garage where "Oswald" applied for a job that overlooked the motorcade route. When further investigated after the assassination, those who delt with the guy who claimed to be "Oswald," when showed a series of photos that included one of Oswald, picked a photo of another suspect. Who was THAT guy?

4.) It stopped raining prior to 12:00 noon on 11/22/63 (hence, the

bubbletop roof was left off of JFK's limousine for the motorcade drive

through Dallas).

Proving this conspiracy goes all the up to the top... angel1.gif

The bubbletop roof was not bulletproof at all, but

it's quite possible that Oswald wouldn't have known that fact on

November 22nd. Seeing the roof in place that day, if it continued to

rain, just might have made Oswald think twice about firing those

gunshots at the limo.

BK: If he was a crazed nutcase who suddenly snapped because his wife spurned him,

why would he stop at anything? That would be a rational act and he was supposed to be

acting irrationally, right?

5.) Oswald was lucky enough to have President Kennedy visit Dallas on

a Friday (i.e., a regular workday for Lee Oswald and the other Book

Depository employees), instead of, say, a Saturday or a Sunday.

If the trip had been on a weekend, you don't think Oswald could have committed the crime?

Think about what you saying here: the TSBD was integral to the assassination plot.

6.) Another small item that relates to #5 above is something that

could well have played a very big factor in Oswald pulling off the

shooting that Friday -- and that is the fact that not only did

Kennedy's visit to Dallas occur on a workday for Oswald (a Friday),

but the parade route took JFK's limo past the Book Depository Building

RIGHT AT LUNCHTIME as well, which meant that most TSBD employees were

on their normal lunch breaks at that hour of the day (and would have

been even if Kennedy had not been scheduled to drive by the building

at noontime).

Would have been at lunch – and most were – including Oswald.

BK: So those responsible for the selection of the motorcade route and its timeing -

Sam Bloom, Peuterbauch et al., were the ones responsible for the assassination?

The normal time for the warehouse employees to break for lunch at the

Depository was from 12:00 Noon to 12:45 PM, just exactly the time

period when President Kennedy was scheduled to drive through Dealey

Plaza on Friday, November 22nd. That information was confirmed via the

Warren Commission testimony of Buell Wesley Frazier (the 19-year-old

who drove Oswald to work on the morning of the assassination):

WESLEY FRAZIER -- "12 o'clock is when we always eat lunch."

JOSEPH BALL -- "12 to 12:45?"

FRAZIER -- "Right."

http://history-matte..._Vol2_0109b.htm

This meant fewer people staying on the upper Depository floors (i.e.,

the "warehouse" floors, which were floors 5, 6, and 7), with those

employees going down to the first-floor "Domino/Lunch Room" or the

second-floor lunch room (or going outside the building to watch the

President pass by) during the exact time when Lee Oswald would require

a VACANT sixth floor in his preparations for shooting the President

during this Friday lunch period.

For Oswald, the above combination of things was simply a made-to-order

combination of factors that just fell into his lap on November 22nd,

1963, including item numbers 4, 5, and 6 mentioned above, which are

things that Oswald HIMSELF could not possibly have had any control

over whatsoever.

Correct emphasis – and correct to talk about control instead of coincidence.

And even #3 as well, to the extent that Oswald was

hired at the TSBD on October 15, 1963, which was a full month prior to

anyone officially announcing the details of JFK's final motorcade

route through Dallas (which included the turn onto Elm Street in front

of the Depository).

Since the local elites were never going to allow it to be anywhere but the Trade Mart, it was always a given what the route would be. Talking about when it was made official, or when it was made public is just a red herring.

Happenstance (and a kook named Lee Harvey) got John F. Kennedy killed.

Not conspiracy.

BK: "An intelligence officer is not inclined to believe happenstance as a reason for events." - David Atlee Phillips.

And your evidence is? Nothing. All you can do is write a bunch of evidence-free twaddle in an attempt to pass it off as established fact.

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Strange for me....I can piece together a conspiracy that was designed to kill President Kennedy complete with the who's the what's the where's the why's and the how's and I can accept the Warren Commission Report as well......but it is just way to simple in its own very complicated way. And to succeed all the conspirators had to do was convince the public that Lee Harvey Oswald could not have done it.......My conspirators could control the timing of the motorcade route. My conspirators were postitioned to cover up evidence (and did as a member of the Warren Commission). My conspirators had a motive and it is very posible that they had used Lee Harvey Oswald previously to obtain another of their goals......oh well.....obviously the old effective approach that has been used for the past 47 years has gotten us a lot closer to naming the killers so we have no need to even think of trying a new and different approach that might shed light on the subject.

Jim Root

Edited by Jim Root
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