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Crowd in Dallas’ Dealey Plaza stands with Libyan demonstrators, criticizes violence | Dallas-Fort Worth Communities - News for Dallas, Texas - The Dallas Morning News

Crowd in Dallas’ Dealey Plaza stands with Libyan demonstrators, criticizes violence

Regime Change for Sixth Floor?

Crowd in Dallas’ Dealey Plaza stands with Libyan demonstrators, criticizes violence | Dallas-Fort Worth Communities - News for Dallas, Texas - The Dallas Morning News

On the grassy knoll near where a U.S. president was assassinated half a century ago, a crowd gathered Sunday to decry political bloodshed 6,000 miles away.

“Free, free Libya!” chanted about 150 people at a Dealey Plaza rally, as they competed with the supportive honks of passing cars. “Stop, stop the massacre!”

A black flag flew above the throng to recognize the hundreds who were reportedly killed last week as Libyan security forces tried to quash a widening revolt.

“People have been killed in Benghazi, in Tobruk, in Al Bayda, in Darnah,” said Saad Elshiltamy, his voice rising above the crowd as he listed the cities of his homeland. “The dictator system there is very strong.”

Elshiltamy said he had come 200 miles for the rally in a car full of other Libyan natives who go to college inOklahoma City . The men said they were upset that President Barack Obama had not spoken out strongly enough against their homeland’s government.

“Why is America late to help our people?” asked Elshiltamy’s friend Hatem Elyamani.

The rally was no larger than the throngs of tourists who cover the plaza on a typical holiday weekend. And its size was a tiny fraction of the massive demonstrations that have shaken or toppled authoritarian governments across the Middle East and North Africa this year.

But the crowd in Dallas had passion beyond its numbers, with many becoming visibly angry as they blamed Libyan dictator Moammar Gadhafi for the country’s repression and violence.

“Our people are dying over there, and nobody is listening,” said Jamal Mohamad of Keller, pacing the sidewalk as he led a round of chanting.

In the back of the crowd, Dallas native Esra El-Haraty said she simply wanted passers-by to know what was happening in her parents’ homeland.

Media attention of Egyptian protests this month played a key role in that government’s swift collapse, she said, but “in Libya there’s not a single reporter.”

Above the handmade signs and headscarves, an American flag flew beside the black one. Many below framed the rally in patriotic terms.

“We want people to know as Americans we support the popular uprisings,” said Emad Salem of Euless, “for them to have democracy and freedom like we did 200 years ago.”

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

BUT WILL THEY FORCE THE AUTOCRATIC REGIME OUT OF THE SIXTH FLOOR?

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Guest Tom Scully

....BUT WILL THEY FORCE THE AUTOCRATIC REGIME OUT OF THE SIXTH FLOOR?

[/size][/font]

What would that accomplish Bill? If you want to change the car, replacing the radiator cap or the hood ornament is not the solution. Things in the U.S. are the way they are by consensus of the most influential. It is not a new condition.

Upton Sinclair described how suppression of truth is accomplished in the news media, in the "Brass Ring" in 1919.

The son first DIA director, Joseph Carroll, described our American condition bluntly, in 2007.:

http://www.nytimes.com/2007/07/30/opinion/30iht-edcarroll.4.6900205.html

The peril of valuing celebrity over history

By James Carroll

Published: Monday, July 30, 2007

...Yet, speaking of history, this conjuring of the appearance of opposition where none actually exists has been mandated by the American political system since the onset of the Cold War. The quadrennial political puppet show, highlighting not opposition but its appearance, is essential to keeping the captive-taking war machine running and to inoculating the American people from the viral knowledge that they themselves were first to be captured.

A minimal acquaintance with history, including dissections of American culture already performed by both Sinclairs, would undermine our national complacency. Upton Sinclair, for example, showed the rapaciousness of capitalism, the vampire-like appetite with which it feeds on the blood of human beings. Even with "reforms" ("The Jungle" led to the establishment of the Food and Drug Administration), the profit-worshipping economy to this day eludes controls that would protect majorities of citizens in this country and across the world. Sinclair Lewis, for his part, showed how the simultaneously banalizing methods of capitalist enterprise (false advertising, consumerism, pieties of affluence, amoral bureaucracy) are exactly what that enterprise created to keep from being criticized. Then inhale the crack cocaine of celebrity....

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lee_Harvey_Oswald

Lee Harvey Oswald

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Lee Harvey Oswald (October 18, 1939 – November 24, 1963) was an American man who, according to four government investigations,[n 1] assassinated John F. Kennedy, the 35th President of the United States....

http://www.salon.com/news/opinion/glenn_greenwald/2011/02/07/egypt/index.html

Monday, Feb 7, 2011 05:08 ET

The Egyptian mirror

By Glenn Greenwald

One of the most revealing journalistic genres is the effort by establishment media outlets to explain to their American audiences why Those Other Countries -- usually in the Middle East -- are so bad and awful and plagued by severe political and societal corruption (see here and here for examples). This morning, The New York Times has a classic entry, as it unironically details how Egypt is a cesspool of oligarchical favoritism and self-dealing. The article focuses on Ahmed Ezz, a close friend of Hosni Mubarak's son who has exploited his political connections to corner much of the nation's steel market, triggering growing resentment by the public. Along the way, we learn several disturbing things about Egypt, including this:

For many years, Mr. Ezz has represented the intersection of money, politics and power . . . . Public resentment at the wealth acquired by the politically powerful helped propel the uprising already reshaping the contours of power along the Nile. . . .

...Can you believe that "in Hosni Mubarak's Egypt," private wealth translates into great political power and vice-versa? What is it like, wonders the curious and concerned Times reader, to live in a country like that? No wonder there's an uprising.

How many American politicians with a national platform over the last thirty years have failed to convert their political standing into great personal wealth? Perhaps only those who began their political careers with great wealth. Ex-Presidents and their wives and top aides are routinely lavished with many millions of dollars from media companies and other corporations for books, speechesand other services (Obama didn't even wait to become President to capitalize on his political celebrity), while a large portion of ex-members of Congress and administration officials with any real power feed at the trough of corporate largesse in exchange for peddling their influence. It would literally be impossible to list all the top officials from both parties who have quickly converted their political influence into vast personal wealth over the past two decades; it'd be much quicker to list the few who haven't.

And that's to say nothing of the virtually limitless political power automatically wielded by those with great private wealth, who own America's government institutions and literally write most of its laws. As the NYT taught us today, "Hosni Mubarak’s Egypt has long functioned as a state where wealth bought political power and political power bought great wealth." We also learn this about Egypt:

While hard facts are difficult to come by, Egyptians watching the rise of a moneyed class widely believe that self-dealing, crony capitalism and corruption are endemic, represented in the public eye by a group of rich businessmen aligned with Gamal Mubarak, the president’s son, as well as key government ministers and governing party members. . ..

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Tom, I was only kidding about the Sixth Floor Regime change.

But how about this?

In May 2008, the US firm General Dynamics inked a $165m (£165m) contract to arm the Libyan army's elite second brigade.

This force, led by Mr Gaddafi's son Khamis, was deployed to the streets of al-Bayda - a city east of Benghazi and near the border with Egypt - where it has unleashed live ammunition on protesters

BBC News - Libya unrest: Violence against protesters backfires

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Guest Tom Scully

Well Bill, as far as the sixth floor, or even arms exporter Gen Dyn of the MIC... there is a new sheriff in town.:

http://anonnews.org/?p=press&a=item&i=449

...ANONYMOUS cannot abide this behavior any longer. The time for us to be idle spectators in your inhumane treatment of fellow Man has reached its apex, and we shall now be moved to action. Thus, we give you a warning: Cease & desist your protest campaign in the year 2011, return to your homes in Kansas, & close your public Web sites.

Should you ignore this warning, you will meet with the vicious retaliatory arm of ANONYMOUS: We will target your public Websites, and the propaganda & detestable doctrine that you promote will be eradicated; the damage incurred will be irreversible, and neither your institution nor your congregation will ever be able to fully recover. It is in your best interest to comply now, while the option to do so is still being offered, because we will not relent until you cease the conduction & promotion of all your bigoted operations & doctrines.

The warning has been given. What happens from here shall be determined by you.

WE ARE ANONYMOUS.

WE ARE LEGION.

WE DO NOT FORGIVE.

WE DO NOT FORGET.

EXPECT US.

Let's see what kind of results they achieve on this one....

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Well Bill, as far as the sixth floor, or even arms exporter Gen Dyn of the MIC... there is a new sheriff in town.:

http://anonnews.org/...ss&a=item&i=449

...ANONYMOUS cannot abide this behavior any longer. The time for us to be idle spectators in your inhumane treatment of fellow Man has reached its apex, and we shall now be moved to action. Thus, we give you a warning: Cease & desist your protest campaign in the year 2011, return to your homes in Kansas, & close your public Web sites.

Should you ignore this warning, you will meet with the vicious retaliatory arm of ANONYMOUS: We will target your public Websites, and the propaganda & detestable doctrine that you promote will be eradicated; the damage incurred will be irreversible, and neither your institution nor your congregation will ever be able to fully recover. It is in your best interest to comply now, while the option to do so is still being offered, because we will not relent until you cease the conduction & promotion of all your bigoted operations & doctrines.

The warning has been given. What happens from here shall be determined by you.

WE ARE ANONYMOUS.

WE ARE LEGION.

WE DO NOT FORGIVE.

WE DO NOT FORGET.

EXPECT US.

Let's see what kind of results they achieve on this one....

Tom,

it is exactly what it looks like - a provocation.

http://www.networkworld.com/community/node/71567

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We ought to be asking how it is that protesters against a North African regime are allowed to congregate in Dallas when Robert Groden is hounded, and just how it comes about that a coup in Egypt can be branded by Google (see last week's 60 Minutes), apparently now the Bell Helicopter of our times.

Edited by David Andrews
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Crowd in Dallas’ Dealey Plaza stands with Libyan demonstrators, criticizes violence

Regime Change for Sixth Floor?

crowd-in-dallas-dealey-plaza-stands-with-libyan-demonstrators-criticizes-violence.ece"]Crowd in Dallas’ Dealey Plaza stands with Libyan demonstrators, criticizes violence | Dallas-Fort Worth Communities - News for Dallas, Texas - The Dallas Morning News[/url][/size]

On the grassy knoll near where a U.S. president was assassinated half a century ago, a crowd gathered Sunday to decry political bloodshed 6,000 miles away.

“Free, free Libya!” chanted about 150 people at a Dealey Plaza rally, as they competed with the supportive honks of passing cars. “Stop, stop the massacre!”

A black flag flew above the throng to recognize the hundreds who were reportedly killed last week as Libyan security forces tried to quash a widening revolt.

“People have been killed in Benghazi, in Tobruk, in Al Bayda, in Darnah,” said Saad Elshiltamy, his voice rising above the crowd as he listed the cities of his homeland. “The dictator system there is very strong.”

Elshiltamy said he had come 200 miles for the rally in a car full of other Libyan natives who go to college inOklahoma City . The men said they were upset that President Barack Obama had not spoken out strongly enough against their homeland’s government.

“Why is America late to help our people?” asked Elshiltamy’s friend Hatem Elyamani.

The rally was no larger than the throngs of tourists who cover the plaza on a typical holiday weekend. And its size was a tiny fraction of the massive demonstrations that have shaken or toppled authoritarian governments across the Middle East and North Africa this year.

But the crowd in Dallas had passion beyond its numbers, with many becoming visibly angry as they blamed Libyan dictator Moammar Gadhafi for the country’s repression and violence.

“Our people are dying over there, and nobody is listening,” said Jamal Mohamad of Keller, pacing the sidewalk as he led a round of chanting.

In the back of the crowd, Dallas native Esra El-Haraty said she simply wanted passers-by to know what was happening in her parents’ homeland.

Media attention of Egyptian protests this month played a key role in that government’s swift collapse, she said, but “in Libya there’s not a single reporter.”

Above the handmade signs and headscarves, an American flag flew beside the black one. Many below framed the rally in patriotic terms.

“We want people to know as Americans we support the popular uprisings,” said Emad Salem of Euless, “for them to have democracy and freedom like we did 200 years ago.”

BUT WILL THEY FORCE THE AUTOCRATIC REGIME OUT OF THE SIXTH FLOOR?

[/size][/font]

Why did these demonstrators choose Dealey Plaza? What does Dealey Plaza mean to them? They should rally somewhere like in DC. What has Dealey Plaza become? Do they want Moamar Kaddafi killed as well? They like popular uprisings? There must be a tremendous amount of Libyans living near Dallas. Or did they travel to meet there? It's like they're glad someone killed the President of the United States and wish something similar for Kaddafi. If they want Kaddafi dead, let them proceed. But don't compare Kaddafi to Kennedy. Or that what happened to him was a good thing, "a popular uprising."

Kathy C

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