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Who created the first democratic republic of the modern age?


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Does anyone know the name of the man who in 1755 designed a constitution where every man over 25 had a vote. It has been claimed that it was the first democratic republic of the modern age. His enlighted system of government found admirers among the radicals of Europe. The same was true of America and the following states named towns after the man who introduced representative democracy: Pennsylvania, Colorado, Indiana, Oklahoma and Wisconsin.

What was the name of this man and where was this representative democracy? More importantly, who destroyed the first attempt at this experiment in democracy.

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I thought it was Iceland more than 900 years ago? Don't know (doubt they called it republic), but afaik Women had the vote too.

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Does anyone know the name of the man who in 1755 designed a constitution where every man over 25 had a vote. It has been claimed that it was the first democratic republic of the modern age. His enlighted system of government found admirers among the radicals of Europe. The same was true of America and the following states named towns after the man who introduced representative democracy: Pennsylvania, Colorado, Indiana, Oklahoma and Wisconsin.

What was the name of this man and where was this representative democracy? More importantly, who destroyed the first attempt at this experiment in democracy.

Here is a clue. Although this man inspired the French Revolution it was the leaders of this revolution who brought an end to this experiment in representative democracy.

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Robespierre?

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It was Corsica but it was put down by the French Crown in 1765 not the revolutionaries. The leader at first supported the French Revolution but then switched to the royalists and was briefly put back in power by the British.

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It was Corsica but it was put down by the French Crown in 1765 not the revolutionaries. The leader at first supported the French Revolution but then switched to the royalists and was briefly put back in power by the British.

Pasquale Paoli, the son of the exiled Corsican leader, Giacinto Paoli, arrived back on the island in 1754. Soon afterwards he was elected as General-in-Chief of Corsica, the commander of all resistance. In 1755 Paoli designed a constitution where every man over 25 had a vote. It has been claimed that it was the first democratic republic of the modern age. Paoli was elected president and despite meague resources he arranged the building of schools and founded a university in Corte. His enlighted system of government found admirers among the radicals of Europe. Jean-Jacques Rousseau was so impressed that he considered moving to Corsica.

French forces invaded Corsica in 1764. Eventually the Genoese ceded their rights to the island. Pasquale Paoli and his supporters now carried on a guerrilla war against the French. In 1769 he was defeated in the Battle of Ponte Novu by vastly superior forces. Voltaire supported the rebels and he later wrote: "The principal weapon of the Corsicans was their courage. This courage was so great that in one of these battles, near a river named Golo, they made a rampart of their dead in order to have the time to reload behind them before making a necessary retreat; their wounded were mixed among the dead to strengthen the rampart. Bravery is found everywhere, but such actions aren't seen except among free people." Paoli was forced to flee from Corsica and went to live in London. The following year Corsica officially became a French province.

After the French Revolution the government granted an amnesty to Pasquale Paoli. He immediately travelled to Corsica and soon afterwards was once again elected president of Corsica. Paoli disagreed with the Reign of Terror and argued against the execution of King Louis XVI. In 1793 announced that Corsica was going to seceded from France and requested the protection of the British government, then at war with revolutionary France. His friend, Napoleon Bonaparte, and fellow Corsican, disagreed with this policy and left the island.

In 1794 Britain sent a fleet to Corsica under Admiral Samuel Hood. Later, Gilbert Elliot-Murray-Kynynmound (1st Earl of Minto) arrived with reinforcements. It was during the fighting to capture Calvi, Captain Horatio Nelson lost the sight in his right eye. Corsica now became a protectorate of King George III and the Earl of Minto was appointed as viceroy of the country, with the power to dissolve parliament and to nominate councillors. This period become known as the Anglo-Corsican Kingdom. When Corsica's national assembly elected Pasquale Paoli as their president, Minto threatened to withdraw his troops and they were forced to back down and Paoli was forced into exile. Paoli's supporters now turned against the new regime and began attacking British soldiers. In September 1796, the British left Corsica and the following month the French reconquered the island.

In the 1790s the French government decided that a number of uprisings on the island should be put down with the maximum force. In 1799, Napoleon Bonaparte staged a coup d'état and installed himself as First Consul. One of his first actions was to crush a rebellion in Corsica and ordered the execution of its leaders.

The towns in the United States named after Pasquale Paoli:

Paoli, Pennsylvania,

Paoli, Colorado

Paoli, Indiana

Paoli, Oklahoma

Paoli, Wisconsin

http://www.spartacus.schoolnet.co.uk/CORSICAguide.htm

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