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Is this receipt for the Mystery Package


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Baylor package photo on page #4: http://digitalcollections.baylor.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/po-arm/id/25951/rec/3

Label photo taken in low light and showing more detail (Gary Murr): http://www.jfkresearch.freehomepage.com/murr.htm

Hi Richard,

Good questions I’ve been asking myself – I’ll comment in a second.

Many of the best investigators in the field are members of the Education Forum. I’m not an investigator or a code buster or anything close, and I’m not asking you to take me seriously. I’m asking you to take this package and its label seriously.

We have an address label that contains some thinly coded messages that we can see by looking at the label. Several of these messages tell us in simple anagram form that the label or the package itself glows in the dark. One of these messages tells us in Spanish that we need to turn out the lights. One of these visible messages tells us that the label is also in binary code. In order, using all of the letters on the label (with the exception of the word “Dallas” which is crossed out), “Lee Oswald 601 West Nassaus St Texas Irving Texa”, yields this simple binary code:

01111100 01101110 01001111 00101110 01010101

http://www.roubaixinteractive.com/PlayGround/Binary_Conversion/Binary_To_Text.asp

Converting this binary code to text yields: “In0.U”. This is Indium Oxide and Uranium. When added to inks, they glow in the dark.

Forget everything else if you like. Forget for a moment that the address line makes two perfect anagrams, “W.G Banister” and “Assassinate”, forget “Alpha 66”, forget every other message I’ve tried to tease out of this label, and just focus on the fact that the creator of the label indicated that there was a binary message, which it does, and that this binary message couldn’t have happened by chance: “01111100 01101110 01001111 00101110 01010101” = “InO. U” = Indium Oxide, and Uranium = GLOW IN THE DARK STUFF.

Here’s my name and address in binary code: “01101110101001100111001110101010”

Here’s what it decodes to:

(sorry, the result is so garbled the site won't let me post it) = Garbage! Garbage in, garbage out.

And I’ve subjected a host of other names and addresses to this test, but this was unnecessary. I retained a PhD Statistician to tell me the likelihood of this happening by chance. After some careful study, he said this would be a nightmare to set up as a statistical problem, but that “…the most guarded thing I can say is that this happening by chance would be wildly unlikely.”

The entire address on the label is 41 letters, and you may have noticed that the last letter on the label was not used (binary requires strings of “1”s and “0”s in multiples of 8). This omitted letter is the “s” at the end of “Irving Texas”. If you enlarge the Baylor photograph so you can see “Iriving Texas” real well, you’ll notice that that last letter in “Texas” is not an “s” at all, but a “Z”. For you chemists that would have liked to have a little zinc in the Indium Oxide, Uranium mix, there it is, the left over letter at the end of the address. If this “Z” is not enough, the entire word “Zinc” is spelled out in the neighborhood of the “Z” in typical Oswald fashion (the “i” is just below the “Z”, the “c” is where the “a” in Texas should be, and the “z” itself does double duty as an “N”).

So Richard, it seems to me that if Oswald thought he might need such a thing for legal protection, since this thing glows in the dark, all his lawyer would need to do is enter the package into evidence, set up the proper lighting, and show the judge and jury what Oswald had created.

“So why didn’t you tell the world what you suspected?” the prosecuting attorney asks.

“Because I’m a spook and I was tasked, along with other agents, with helping to prevent an assassination attempt against the President. I began to suspect my fellow agents were not only going to kill the President, but set me up as the patsy. It was only a suspicion on my part and I thought I might be just paranoid, so I did this in case I wound up dead.”

And Richard said: “Another possibility is that the label was coded as a message for someone in the intelligence community. If this were the case, I would expect a more sophisticated method, possibly using a pre-arranged code already known to the intended other party(s).”

I think so too. The most sophisticated coding device he uses is the one used by school kids, not spies: A=0, B=1, C=2. I feel certain that Oswald thought this label could be easily decoded once it was looked at closely.

The thing that gets me, is why nobody noticed this before?

If the F.B.I. was altering evidence in those days, why do we have this? Sure, lots of employees saw it at the Irving Post Office and the package couldn’t just disappear, but if the F.B.I. knew it was an easily decodable document, one that pointed a big fat finger at one of their own (Guy Banister), why didn’t they just manufacture a facsimile that didn’t glow in the dark – a sanitized version. Take the “s” off of “Nassaus”, and the binary code doesn’t work and neither does the anagram “Assassinate”. Take a couple of the extra letters embedded in the “W” in West away, and “W.G. Banister” doesn’t work.

This thing’s been around for 48 years, and no researcher that I know of has ever tried to decode it. So a tentative conclusion might be that the F.B.I. never realized it was a glow-in-the-dark coded message either. I don’t know.

Tommy said: “John Hurt?”

Indeed. Who did Oswald trust with this knowledge? He might have been between a rock and hard place – he didn’t want to share his news with the world, only to end up blowing his cover if his worst fears didn't come to pass, but he wanted something fairly innocent looking that would only be studied when and if he became suddenly infamous. There may have been more messages that did fall down the memory hole – who knows?

Tom

Standard number/letter coding device used by Oswald:

(A=0)(B=1)(C=2)(D=3)(E=4)(F=5)(G=6)(H=7)(I=8)(J=9)(K=10)(L=11)(M=12)(N=13)

(O=14)(P=15)(Q=16)(R=17)(S=18)(T=19)(U=20)(V=21)(W=22)(X=23)(Y=24)(Z=25)

Change letters to binary code: (numbers are either odd or even - zeros or ones)

(A=1)(B=0)(C=1)(D=0)(E=1)(F=0)(G=1)(H=0)(I=1)(J=0)(K=1)(L=0)(M=1)(N=0)

(O=1)(P=0)(Q=1)(R=0)(S=1)(T=0)(U=1)(V=0)(W=1)(X=0)(Y=1)(Z=0)

Binary to text:

http://www.roubaixinteractive.com/PlayGround/Binary_Conversion/Binary_To_Text.asp

Edited by Tom Hume
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[...]

Another possibility is that the label was coded as a message for someone in the intelligence community. If this were the case, I would expect a more sophisticated method, possibly using a pre-arranged code already known to the intended other party(s).

Within this context, a proper question arises. Who was LHO trying to contact after he was charged with the murders? If there was a piece of evidence that could be used in his defense or point to the perpetrators, it would be a priority to have someone secure that evidence.

[...]

John Hurt?

--Tommy :)

Japanese linguist, cryptologist, NSA. Oswald attempted to call him the night he was arrested.

Interesting thread on John Hurt:

http://educationforum.ipbhost.com/index.php?showtopic=2967&st=105

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...The thing that gets me, is why nobody noticed this before?

If the FBI was altering evidence in those days, why do we have this?

Sure, lots of employees saw it at the Irving Post Office and the package couldn’t just disappear, but if the FBI knew it was an easily decodable document, one that pointed a big fat finger at one of their own (Guy Banister), why didn’t they just manufacture a facsimile that didn’t glow in the dark – a sanitized version.

Take the “s” off of “Nassaus”, and the binary code doesn’t work and neither does the anagram “Assassinate”. Take a couple of the extra letters embedded in the “W” in West away, and “W.G. Banister” doesn’t work.

This thing’s been around for 48 years, and no researcher that I know of has ever tried to decode it. So a tentative conclusion might be that the FBI never realized it was a glow-in-the-dark coded message either. I don’t know...

Tom

Tom, this thread is the first I've read about anything like this, also. I believe this is a new line of research, and I think that you and John deserve the credit for bringing it forth.

Now - about the glow-in-the-dark discovery that you recently exposed - I firmly believe that sympathetic researchers should help you obtain access to the package itself, the actual object, and physically prove whether it can glow in the dark (or contains traces of chemicals that suggest that it glowed in the dark 48 years ago).

That is the only way that this question can be resolved - and of course its resolution will change the course of your current theory. Because, if it does glow in the dark, then photographs of that glowing will also display new codes and new clues. It is like a mystery within a mystery -- extremely intriguing.

Also, you wondered if Oswald was a 'blooming genius' because of the elaborate nature of this code structure. I don't think this code proves genius -- yet. Yes, he was smart enough to be selected at a young age to participate in Military Intelligence work - so that's a plus. Yes, he learned Russian at a young age - that's a plus. Yet his political concepts tended to be half-baked, and that's a minus.

It seems to me that Oswald was more fascinated by the fun and games in the field of spying. Fairly smart, but in many ways an ordinary kid.

Let's examine the other side -- there are many aspects of his code that are standard, for example, starting with "0", and also the use of binary digits. These are common rules for computer programmers. Because of these common rules, we should probably trace the code that Oswald used to somebody else.

In other words, because of these standard computer rules, Oswald probably didn't invent this code -- somebody taught him.

John Hurt is a likely candidate, but when computer geeks are involved, they don't run as loners -- they tend to come in packs. So Oswald possibly belonged to an underground group that used this code as a group.

Jim Garrison once thought that Oswald was an FBI agent who worked under J. Edgar Hoover. Now - I would not ask any former FBI agents, Tom, if the code that you and John cracked was ever (or still is) a standard FBI code, because that might be a matter of National Security.

However, it is suspicious that: (i) J. Edgar Hoover knew about Lee Harvey Oswald while Lee was still in Russia; and (ii) J. Edgar Hoover sealed Oswald's FBI records - including tax records - from public viewing, period.

What I'm saying, Tom, is that you might have broken a standard FBI code -- something many FBI operatives used (or still use). Harry Dean confirmed that the FBI told him that he must either invent his own code or the FBI would give him one. Well, perhaps this is the very code that the FBI would have obliged Harry to use if he had not invented his own (which he did).

Best regards,

--Paul Trejo

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I’m editing this post again to reflect my current thinking on this matter.

A big apology is in order: I no longer believe the package label was intended to be converted to eight-bit binary code and therefore does not decode to a formula for glow-in-the-dark ink. Please forgive my ignorant mistake.

I made a number of mistakes, and chief among them was assuming that since I learned eight-bit binary code while in the service in the 60’s, that that’s what “Oswald” might have been intending with the expression “;01”, in “6;01”. And of course if “he” was intending anything here, it seems more likely that he intended for us to transform the address label into 6-bit binary code, by including the expression, “6;01”, on the address label.

The photo of the label on the “Undeliverable Package” can be seen here: http://www.jfkresearch.freehomepage.com/murr.htm

Six bit binary code can been seen here (Binary map of GBCD code): http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BCD_(6-bit)

There are some choices to be made in converting the label to binary code, and different choices lead to different answers. I think I’ve pretty much tested all of the possibilities, and only a very few of them lead to coherent information. More about my methodology later, but here is my best guess as to what the label was intended to say when converted to 6-bit binary code:

“\OZ! NS$”

Seven binary characters, “Backslash, O, Z, !, N, S, and $”, from the 42 hand-written letters on the address label (“Dallas” is crossed out, and “Irving Texas” is written below the label).

Here is the definition of “Backslash”, also called “hack” and “whack” from Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Backslash

If this is what was indeed intended, this part of the story being told by the label might be something like, “Oz is about to get whacked, and National Security and money play a role in what’s about to happen.”

Before I get to the tedious methodology, if one uses “Dallas”, which has been crossed out on the label, another possibility is, “\OZ! MVS $”. I’ve not been able to find an applicable meaning for “MVS”, however.

Here is how I’m reading the label:

Lee Oswald

GAB West Nassaies St

(Dallas is crossed out) Texas

Irving texas

Notice that I’ve changed the “601” to “GAB” using the simplest method for changing numbers into letters and visa versa; A=0, B=1, C=2, D=3, etc. This seems justified if you buy into my argument that “601 West” converted to “GAB West”, and including the extra imbedded letters in the “W” in “West (“i”, “n”, and “r”), make “GABWINREST”, a perfect anagram for “W.G. Banister”.

Notice also that I’m spelling what most people always thought was “Nassaus”, as “Nassaies”. Neither one of them are existing street names, so take a good look at it and see if you don’t agree that it could be taken as either one. Once again, “Nassaies” is possibly justified because if you add the imbedded “A” that appears to be attached to the vertical portion of the “t” in “St”, we have “NASSAIES STA” which is a perfect anagram for the word “Assassinate”.

So here is what the binary code for the above address label looks like to me:

011111 100110 111001 111111 100101 110010 101011

This, once again, decodes to: “\ OZ! NS $”

For changing the letters on the label to zeros and ones, I used the odd letters of the alphabet (ACEGIKMOQSUWY) as ones, and the even letters of the alphabet (BDFHJLNPRTVXZ) as zeros.

Doing it the opposite way yields: “^I60&:D” - I don’t find meaning in this.

And we might have been instructed to do it the way I’ve done: Looking at the label, there is a spike, like a little #1, sticking out of the top of the “a” in Oswald. There’s an identical spike sticking out of the top of the “0” in “601”. This might be telling us two things; that “a” and “0” are equivalent; that is, when converting numbers to letters and visa versa, “A=0, B=1, etc.” But also, when converting to binary code, the “A” and the “0” remain equivalent, and since the “0” gets converted to an “A”, we are allowed to use the “A” as a “1” in the binary-code decoding process (odd letters are “1” and even letters are “0”).

Tortured? Perhaps. But if this label was intended to carry messages, then we seem to be being spoon fed from time to time.

If, by some chance, “\OZ! NS $” was the intended binary message, then some other things also seem to be true: The person or persons that concocted the package and label, also crossed out “Dallas” and wrote “Irving Texas” below the label and the package was intended to end up in Irving. Also, “Nassaies”, not “Nassaus”, was the intended spelling of the non-existent Dallas’ street.

I honestly no longer have a strong opinion as to whether this label and package were created, by Oswald or whoever, as a series of puzzles designed to contain meaningful information. I’m tantalized by indications that it may glow in the dark, by suspicions that the label is filled with tiny cartoons and pieces of photographs, that there is information waiting for us to discover that is only hinted at in the clutter of this pixel-poor version of the label photograph.

Several members of this forum have helped me try to find a better photo, and I’ve had some very pleasant email exchanges with the son of the deceased gentleman that had the label photographed at the National Archives years ago. But so far, Gary Murr’s copy is the best I’ve encountered, and it’s not good enough, at least for me.

I’ll end my edit of this post with this:

If you take all of the capital letters on the label (I’m converting the “601” to “GAB” and regarding them as capitals) (and the “t” in Irving texas is not capitalized on the package), we have, “LO GAB W N S T I”, which is an anagram for “L O’s Twin Bag”, and it was claimed that the Undeliverable Package contained a bag very much like the one supposedly found on the sixth floor of the TSBD.

Once again, I appologize for all the errors I've made on this topic.

Tom

Edited by Tom Hume
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Greg Parker dug this up from "The Official CIA Manual of Trickery & Deception", and Lee Farley passed along to me. Lee also provided the links at the bottom containing information about the Oswald's supply of pharmaceuticals in the first two links, and the third link is a related fascinating read - Thanks again Lee.

http://www.servimg.com/image_preview.php?i=80&u=14320506

“One of TSS’s first employees was Dr. Sidney Gottlieb, who degree in chemistry from the California Institute of Technology made him the logical choice to head the handful of chemists in the staff. Initially the chemistry branch created and tested formulas, or “special inks,” for secret writing that enabled CIA spies to embed invisible messages in otherwise innocuous correspondence. To conceal the liquid “disappearing inks,” TSS reformulated the liquids into a solid form that looked like aspirin tablets and repackaged the tablets in pill bottles that would pass unnoticed in an agent’s medicine cabinet. When a spy had information to convey, he would dissolve the tablet in water or alcohol to reconstitute the ink for his secret message.”

http://www.maryferrell.org/mffweb/archive/viewer/showDoc.do?docId=62274&relPageId=67

(Many interesting pages here; it appears that Oswald had a small pharmacy at his apartment. A hand written inventory/opinion on Page 80 deals with “Item 373” and states, “There are 31 samples of pharmaceuticals, each sample of which, could be used to prepare and/or develop a secret ink message.” A handwritten note was added to this, stating, “Nothing unusual found concerning these items.”)

Edit - links added:

More from Lee Farley. Paragraph “d” is very interesting.

http://www.maryferrell.org/mffweb/archive/viewer/showDoc.do?mode=searchResult&absPageId=396556

Also from Lee: “This next link is from the book written by Carlos Bringuier (the Cuban who had the phoney altercation with Oswald on Canal Street in New Orleans in the Summer of '63):”

http://www.maryferrell.org/mffweb/archive/viewer/showDoc.do?mode=searchResult&absPageId=377312

Food for thought.

Tom

Edited by Tom Hume
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