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CE 573 "Walker Bullet" NOT the REAL Bullet ?


Gil Jesus
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Walker to FBI:

"The bullet before your select committee called the Walker bullet is not the Walker bullet. It is not the bullet that was fired at me and taken out of my house by the Dallas City Police on April 10, 1963. The bullet you have was not gotten from me or taken out of my house by anyone at anytime."

Walker then sends a mailogram to Blakey that the bullet recovered was nothing more than a hunk of lead that didn't even resemble a bullet:

"The bullet used and pictured on the TV by US Senate G.Robert Blakey Committee on Assassinations is a ridiculous substitute for a bullet completely mutilated by such obstruction, baring no resemblance to any unfired bullet in shape or form.

I saw the hunk of lead, picked up by a policeman in my house, and I took it from him and I inspected it carefully. There is no mistake. There has been a substitution for the bullet fired by Oswald and taken out of my house."

In a June,1979 letter to a deputy AG, Walker's attorney noted his client's experience with weapons and ammunition:

"It is more probable than not that a person of this experience would know and recognize the bullet that was fired at him when he and the Dallas police retrieved and examined the spent bullet at the time of the attempted assassination on him.

For these reasons I feel that it is of some weight that the Select Committee and the Department of Justice consider his opinions with respect to the possibility of substituted evidence in the House Committee investigation."

http://jfk.hood.edu/Collection/Weisberg%20Subject%20Index%20Files/W%20Disk/Walker%20Shooting/Item%2005.pdf

Edited by Gil Jesus
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CE573 looks just like a Carcano bullet. Anybody can tell that just by glancing at the picture below (which shows the similarities between CE573 and CE399):

I've always been surprised that no firearms expert could link it to Rifle C2766, because it sure looks like it's got plenty of undamaged surface area to make a positive identification. But evidently not.

CE573+%26+CE399+Comparison.jpg

Edited by David Von Pein
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Walker's belief is, of course, supported by the Dallas Police report which describes the actual bullet as "steel jacket". (24H39)

There's more problems with this piece of evidence. The bullet was also described as a 30.06.

http://i39.tinypic.com/5v2n81.jpg

And there are problems with the chain of custody. Commission Exhibit 1953 is the FBI report on the Walker shooting.

http://history-matters.com/archive/jfk/wc/wcvols/wh23/pdf/WH23_CE_1953.pdf

In that report, TWO DIFFERENT DETECTIVES CLAIMED TO HAVE FOUND THE BULLET !!!! ( McElroy and Norvell ) It also claims that Lt. Day received the bullet from Det. B.G. Brown and took it to the Dallas Police Crime Lab at Parkland Hospital for an idenntification. The bullet remained there from April 25th to December 2, 1963 at which time it as released back to Lt. Day. The FBI got the bullet on December 4th, but didn't turn it over to the Commission until March 21, 1964.

The interesting thing in this document is the reference to the discrepancies in the police reports on page 18.

B . G . NORVELL States, 'Officer B . G . NORVELL found the bullet. . . " and it was given to Det. B.G. BROWN, Crime Laboratory Division .

Over a year later, on May 28, 1964, Detective DON MCELROY advised he found the bullet and turned it over to Officer BROWN .

On the same date, Officer BROWN stated he obtained the bullet from officer NORVELL.

Officer TUCKER, on June 2, 1964, and formar Officer NORVELL, on June 3, 1964, both stated NORVELL found the bullet and he, in turn, gave it to McELROY, who said he would take it or give it to the Dallas Police Department Crime

Laboratory.

So Norvell says he found the bullet and gave it to Brown.

McElroy says he found the bullet and gave it to Brown.

Then, a few days later, Norvell changes his mind and says that although he found the bullet, he gave it to McElroy.

This version is backed by his partner, Tucker.

But Brown is already on record as saying he received the bullet from Norvell.

There's major problems with this chain of custody not to mention the fact that none of these officers were called to testify regarding the identification of CE 573 as the bullet they recovered.

Edited by Gil Jesus
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Mr. Eisenberg....I would like to state for the record that this bullet was found in the Walker residence after the attempted assassination of General Walker.

Mr. Mccloy. As far as you know, we have no proof of that yet?

Mr. Eisenberg. That is right (3H438)

Martin, a lot of this kind of stuff went on during the hearings: stating FOR THE RECORD that something WAS evidence before it was proven that it was.

The prosecution could never have gotten away with that during a trial.

CE 1953 ( 23 H 758 ) says that Lt. Day said he marked "Day" on CE 573, but not until he took the bullet to Parkland. That was on April 25th, some two weeks after the shooting. Norvell said that he marked the bullet either "BN" or "N" on the base of the bullet. But Norvell was never called to testify for the Commission. One would think that given the importance of the evidence, the officer who found it woud have been required to identify it under oath by finding the mark he allegedly put on it.

Absent that identification, no chain of custody can be established for this bullet.

I also find it odd that Norvell's mark was either/or. Officers usually don't use two marks when marking evidence, lest they end up confusing their mark with someone else's. I also can't accept that the either/or was because of a failure of his memory. It wasn't like he handled a lot of bullets. I feel that his uncertainty which mark he used is evidence that "his mark" was put on the bullet by someone else and that not knowing how they marked it, led him to the either/or statement.

CE 1953 goes on to explain what happened from Norvell's viewpoint:

"....later he gave this bullet to Detective McELROY, of the Burglary and Theft Squad, and McELROY advised that he would take the bullet to the Dallas Police Department Criminal Laboratory for examination . NORVELL stated he did not observe McElroy mark the bullet for identification while in NORVELL's presence . NORVELL advised this was the last time he had seen this bullet . He stated the bullet was mutilated and mushroomed from impact, except for the base and a fraction of an inch from the base .

Not only did McElroy not find the bullet, there's no evidence that he ever took the bullet to Parkland for identification.

Destroying any notion that evidence tampering/substitution is nothing more than a "kook fantasy", we have a credible witness ( Walker ), who was present at the time the bullet was recovered, and who saw and handled the recovered bullet, saying that the bullet in evidence ( CE 573 ) was NOT the bullet that was recovered and is instead a susbtituted bullet.

I'm not surprised the Warrenatti in this forum are staying away from this thread.

Edited by Gil Jesus
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''Oswald was set-up for the assassination'' and ''Oswald told her he took a shot at Walker.'' are not mutually exclusive

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Yes, I agree, but part of the point I was making is that she said ''Oswald told her''. That's not the same as Oswald did it.

Sill:

as a side issue there's a bit in Oswalds 'manuscript where he writes a bit about the Minutemen, I think it worthy of consideration.

Also a JBS MO is illustrated by the ''Reagan Ruckus'. (Discussed in the Berkley Barb.)

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That's it, Martin.

I think an answer may lie in the aside I posted. (I've posted previously on these matters though a complete synthesis evades me, though I think it's hinted at). The Minutemen bit's about Oswalds comments about the way forward and the Ruckus about the JBS offering (supposedly) secretly Reagan support or opposition depending on what he instructed them.

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a partial search.

http://educationforu...ndpost&p=205264

http://educationforu...ndpost&p=204136

http://educationforu...ndpost&p=195301

the last is based on a copy of an article in the berkley barb that is in the Underground Collection.

http://educationforu...nd&fromsearch=1

edit typo

Edited by John Dolva
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Yes, I agree, but part of the point I was making is that she said ''Oswald told her''. That's not the same as Oswald did it.

Sill:

as a side issue there's a bit in Oswalds 'manuscript where he writes a bit about the Minutemen, I think it worthy of consideration.

Also a JBS MO is illustrated by the ''Reagan Ruckus'. (Discussed in the Berkley Barb.)

Gotcha.

Why would he tell her that though if he didn't do it?

You may have already considered this, Martin, but I don't see it in this thread, so I'll present for your comment the research given by Dick Russell in his book, The Man Who Knew Too Much in which he talks about the Walker shooting a great deal. Here's what Dick Russell presented:

1. Oswald was continually complaining to George DeMohrenschildt and Volkmar Schmidt how badly JFK messed up with the Bay of Pigs.

2. DeMohrenschildt and Schmidt decided to change Oswald's focus of anger onto a guy they didn't like: General Edwin Walker, who in late 1962 was involved in race riots in Mississipi, at Oxford University, when James Meredith, a black Air Force veteran, insisted on attending that college.

3. As a result of this riot, RFK had General Walker committed to an insane asylum. (This lasted about a week, and then Dr. Thomas Szasz and the ACLU objected that General Walker was a political prisoner, and that he was no more insane than anybody else in the right-wing of USA politics.) The Justice Department dropped the charges.

4. Anyway, DeMohrenschildt and Schmidt worked on Oswald until Oswald became enraged at General Walker, and began to act.

5. In early 1963 Oswald, forged a fake ID, obtained some weapons, and had Marina take a photo of him wearing his weapons.

6. Since Oswald worked at the Jaggers-Chiles-Stovall photocopying shop, Oswald had access to photographic tools to make a fake ID, and to alter Marina's photograph so he had at least two variations (so he could later prove that they were faked, if they ever fell into the hands of the police).

7. For his odd behavior, he was fired by Jaggers-Chiles-Stovall.

8. During this time, Walker was on a right-wing speaking tour with Billy James Hargis; the so-called Midnight Ride, in which they made lots of money warning packed arenas about Communists in the US Government.

9. During this time, also, there were a couple of young right-wing leaders from just ending their US Army tour in Germany, Larrie Schmidt and his brother, Robbie Schmidt, who were trying to infiltrate General Walker's right-wing organization, to try to take it over.

10. Larrie Schmidt and his brother didn't make much progress. Yet Dick Russell talked to Robbie Schmidt and learned the following story:

11. One day Larrie and his brother met Oswald - they didn't say how. They got to talking about how much they all hated General Edwin Walker, and they agreed to go shoot him. (This is on page 326 in Dick Russell's book.)

12. So, they planned it out, carefully. They used the Schmidt's car. (LHO lied to Marina about using the bus with Marina, to protect the Schmidt brothers.)

13. There were at least two rifles in that shooting. So General Walker could find shells that were not from an Italian rifle, while others would find the Italian shells.

14. There were at least two people in the car that the witness saw drive away.

15. So, Oswald told Marina part of the truth.

16. I believe that Marina told the truth in her sworn testimony to the Warren Commission, and she never changed that testimony.

17. Remember that Marina told the Warren Commission that she had very little information to work with, and that Oswald kept her in the dark. She always said that if she had more information, her opinion would change.

18. For example, Oswald lost his job with Jaggars-Chiles-Stovall on 4/1/1963, but he didn't tell Marina about it until weeks later. Still, he left the house every morning, as if going to work. What was he doing? She had no idea.

19. On 4/13/1963, George and Jeanne DeMohrenschildt argued with each other all evening about who shot at General Walker. They were afraid to think it was Lee Oswald, whom they had tried to help.

20. At 10pm on Saturday evening, they took a toy Easter bunny to the Oswald's, for the baby. They were invited in. In that time, Jeanne looked around for a rifle, and she found it. She told George by yelling it across the house.

21. George made a joke about Oswald shooting at Walker, and Oswald just froze. So did Marina. Then George laughed, and they all laughed. Then the DeMohrenschildt's left for the evening -- and they never laid eyes on the Oswald's again in their lives.

22. The next day, reports Dick Russell, George DeMohrenschildt tells his friends Mr. and Mrs. Igor Voshinin that Oswald was Walker's shooter. As soon as he left, Mrs. Walker immediately told the FBI. (This is on page 318 in Russell's book.)

23. This is important because in the Warren Commission the FBI said they had no clue that Oswald was Walker's shooter until Marina told them so in early December, 1963. So they lied; they knew.

24. General Walker also knew (probably from the FBI themselves, that very night). Dick Russell proves this by reference to the German newspaper, the Deutsche NationalZeitung, which had an exclusive interview with General Walker on 11/23/1963, less than 24 hours after the JFK assassination.

25. In that interview, according to Helmut Muench of that newspaper, General Walker told him that Oswald had been his April shooter. The publication of that interview on 11/29/1963 is today a matter of public record. (The text can be found in the Mary Ferrell archives.)

26. All his life, General Walker would tell people that Oswald was his shooter. It is the subject of many of his letters and articles.

27. Yet to the Warren Commission, General Walker said he did not know who shot at him; and that the bullets that he found did not match the bullets that the FBI found.

28. General Walker also denied to Dick Russell that he knew beforehand, and he insisted that the German newsman "guessed right".

29. But when Dick Russell confronted him with evidence that Larrie Schmidt and his brother were also involved, Walker did not reject that information, but said, "I have been told that!"

So, in conclusion, Martin, John Dolva is correct in saying that Marina could be telling the truth (as she heard it) and Oswald could have been telling the truth (i.e. part of the truth) and General Walker could also be telling the truth (that he wished to share).

In my theory, Walker, to get revenge on Lee Harvey Oswald for this shooting, sought to make Oswald a patsy in a conspiracy that he had heard about from his extreme right-wing connections (that probably included Guy Banister in New Orleans).

Marina Oswald, George DeMohrenschildt and Jean DeMohrenschildt were accessories to the Walker shooting; after the fact, since they didn't call the police. That is why they all acted so guilty so often.

Best regards,

--Paul Trejo

Edited by Paul Trejo
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Paul sounds like you have a really comprehensive timeline for Walker? Could you do a post on it. (if it goes far back that would be great as I think his time processing prisoners of war in Norway and his role in Little Rock are particularly pertinent (Even his and his lawyer Watts involvement with the FBI regarding MAD magazine, while funny does tell some things..)

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Paul sounds like you have a really comprehensive timeline for Walker? Could you do a post on it. (if it goes far back that would be great as I think his time processing prisoners of war in Norway and his role in Little Rock are particularly pertinent (Even his and his lawyer Watts involvement with the FBI regarding MAD magazine, while funny does tell some things..)

John, thanks for the vote of confidence. However, my timeline of General Walker is still under construction. I use information from the Warren Commission (1964), Chris Cravens (1991), Dick Russell (1992) and the Briscoe Center for American History. I am only now beginning to form a consistent portrait of a conspiracy.

Here, however, is another vital snippet -- the time when JFK and RFK detained General Walker in a psychiatric prison in September of 1962. (Part of this was posted in another Forum thread, so my apologies if you've seen it.)

1. IMHO, the main motive for General Walker's participation (or leadership) in a conspiracy to kill JFK in Dallas on 11/22/1963, begins with the Kennedys unjustly detaining General Walker for psychiatric examination. Walker was no random psychopath - he was a former US General, heavily decorated for service to the USA in World War Two and Korea.

2. But the Kennedys were taking strident jabs at the John Birch Society (JBS) starting in 1960, and General Walker was a member of the JBS since 1959. As Commander of the 24th Infantry Division in Augsburg, Germany, Walker circulated Birch Society literature in his Pro-Blue program of soldier education. Walker reasoned that since soldiers were risking their lives to fight Communism, that they deserved to know what Communism "really" was.

3. But in the August of 1960, folks from the OVERSEAS WEEKLY newspaper, which was far more liberal, grew tired of taking insults from Edwin Walker, whom they suspected of being gay. So the OVERSEAS WEAKLY openly printed that the Pro-Blue Program was a right-wing brainwashing program.

4. The Joint Chiefs and Robert McNamara then relieved General Walker of his command and moved him to an isolated desk job. Walker had cause a "shore flap", and crossed the line, they said, when he called Eleanor Roosevelt and Harry Truman 'pink' in his memoranda.

5. Yet General Walker had plenty of friends in Congress and in the Texas legislature. Thirty Senators of the Texas Senate in May, 1961, for example, demanded reinstatement of Walker's command over the 24th Infantry Division. But to no avail. On June 12, 1961, the Joint Chiefs formally 'admonished' Walker.

6. This was opposed in Congress by Barry Goldwater, John Tower, Strom Thurmond, Bob Dole and Dale Alford. Public support of Walker was very high. Goldwater called the JFK dmonishment, "Muzzling the Military."

7. In response, near then end of October, 1961, the Kennedys offered Walker a transfer to Hawaii, and a promotion. But as November, 1961 opened, General Walker resigned.

8. Repeat: Walker did not retire, nor was he fired. He was the only US General to resign in the 20th century. By resigning instead of retiring, he gave up a $1,000 a month pension (which amounts to $10,000 monthly in 2011 dollars). He was 52 years old.

9. He explained his resignation saying that Hawaii was just a stepping stone to Vietnam, and he'd vowed he'd never enter into another undeclared war after Korea.

10. Why would he do this? Well, Eisenhower had also chimed in against Walker, by saying in public that as long as a man wears a military uniform, he has no business entering politics. Walker later made it clear that by leaving the military, he would be free to enter politics. That's really what happened.

11. To get started - since he had no pension now - somebody had to bankroll him. As soon as he left the Army, General Walker received a free office in one of the Oil Company skyscrapers in Dallas. So - who do we think lent him his first bankroll? For that matter - who encouraged him to abandon his pension and pursue a life of politics?

12. Walker spent his first months out of the military typing speeches. At the end of 1961, Walker appeared on ABC television, on "Issues and Answers", where he declared himself a non-aligned anti-communist, period. Days later he was on the front cover of Newsweek (12/4/1961) as the face of USA rightists. Things were looking up.

13. Walker's speeches were very well attended and lucrative for him. Thousands attended. Governors and Mayors would introduce him.

14, Walker would get multiple standing ovations as he slammed the White House for: (1) accepting a divided Germany; (2) recalling MacArthur from Korea; (3) letting Cuba go Red; (4) the Bay of Pigs; and (5) Muzzling the Military. (In his first speech, the crowd applauded 109 times in 90 minutes, and there were fifteen standing ovations.)

15. After his first speech, Mayor Earl Cabell gave Walker the key to Dallas and a Stetson hat. (This event was filmed and can be found on Youtube.)

16. As 1962 began, Walker was on 100 radio stations and closed circuit TV. (He was on the fast track to become the 'Rush Limbaugh' of his day.) He advocated only two groups: the JBS, and the Texas-based 'National Indignation Committee'. In this way, Walker earned lots of money and got lots of attention, so he was almost ready to enter politics.

17. In early 1962, he took $1,000 to Austin to file his bid to run for the office of Governor of Texas, and he entered the race against John Connally.

18. But first things first: in April, 1962, Walker had to testify before the Senate Armed Services Committee, and its Subcommittee on Cold War Education, about "muzzling the military." Because, even though he retired, the whole question of JFK trying to tell Generals what they could and could not teach their soldiers, became a Congressional issue.

19. Senator John Fulbright complained that some Army Officers were taking political stands. Senator Strom Thurmond retorted that Fulbright wished to muzzle the military and demanded a vote on Officer Censorship. The Kennedys, fearing Walker could become a martyr, banned TV and Radio coverage of these hearings. The Senate hearing room was packed.

20. Predictably, Walker pontificated like Joe McCarthy, and was arguably making some progress, when suddenly, Norman Rockwell of the USA Nazi Party entered the Senate hearing room wearing a full Nazi uniform and shouting out praises of Walker. Rockwell was quickly ejected, but the damage was done.

21. This public embarrassment contributed to Walker's poor showing at the polls, and he failed to win the Democratic nomination for Governor of Texas.

22. Still, Walker continued his successful speaking tour. He developed a closer relationship with right-wing radio commentator, Bill Ray Hargis, and so increased his prospects of national fame and wealth.

23. Walker set up 'Friends of Walker' clubs throughout Texas, based in Dallas. He started the American Eagle Publishing Company. He erected a billboard on his front lawn on Turtle Creek Road. He changed the message weekly, viz:

* The UN is Treason

* Impeach Earl Warren

* Dump Estes

* Sodom, Gomorrah or Wallace

24. Notice that first billboard, which many of us may have seen on USA highways or bumber-stickers. "US out of UN" was like a religion for Walker; he despised the UN above all other institutions. He didn't hate Adlai Stevenson personally, but since Adlai was the US Ambassador to the UN, he was fair game according to General Walker.

25. I would also point out that second billboard, "Impeach Earl Warren." This was an on-going drumbeat of the right-wing from 1960 through 1964. Walker had little respect for the Supreme Court in general, and accused the judges of being "Antichrist." Yet Earl Warren would figure in Walker's personal life in the months to come.

26. Suddenly, everything changed on September 10, 1962, when Supreme Court Justice Hugo Black decided in favor of James Meredith, a Negro Air Force veteran, who sued to attend Oxford University in Mississippi, which was exclusively open to whites only.

27. On 9/13/1962, Mississippi Governor Ross Barnett announced he would fight the Supreme Court.

28. On 9/26/1962, Walker went on radio KWKH and said:

- "It is time to move!

- "We have talked, listened and been pushed around far too much by the Antichrist Supreme Court!

- "Rise to stand beside Governor Ross Barnett at Jackson Mississippi!

- "Now is the time to be heard!

- "Ten thousand strong from every State in the Union!

- "Rally to the cause of Freedom!

- "The Battle Cry of the Republic!

- "Barnett, yes, Castro, no!

- "Bring your flags, your tents and your skillets!

- "It is time!

- "Now or never!"

29. When the Associated Press asked Walker if he wanted his followers to bring guns, he said, "That's up to them!" Walker said he opposed forced integration. This was about States' Rights.

30. On 9/28/1962 Walker flew a private plane to Jackson, Mississippi. He called for a "national uprising against the conspiracy from within!" He warned that thousands were coming. He warned that "any violence would start with the Feds!"

31. On 9/29/1962 JFK told hundreds of Federal Marshalls to proceed to Mississippi. That evening a riot broke out on the Oxford campus. On the lawn outside the Lyceum building a hostile crowd of about 2,000 youths was chanting: "Go to hell, JFK! Go to hell, JFK!" They threw eggs, rocks and bricks at the Marshalls.

32. Kennedy came on national radio and defended his decision. He added that James Meredith had been in his dorm room for an hour, and still had Federal protection.

33. A newsman's car was trashed by the mob - and his camera was smashed and burned. Tear gas did not move this mob - one Marshall was wounded by a shotgun, but the Marshalls had orders not to return fire.

34. At 9pm Walker walked to the front of the mob, in silence, and surveyed the situation, and ultimately sent the mob home. The crowd booed and jeered and began to disperse...slowly.

35. But at midnight some stragglers were still trashing the campus. At 1:30am Walker went back to his Hotel. At 2am JFK sent in regular troops. Now the violence began; 106 Marshalls were wounded. One local citizen was killed. One French reporter was killed.

36. Despite all this, on 9/30/1962, at 8am, James Meredith was registered as a student. By 9am the crowd was finally gone.

37. The Associated Press reported that Walker led one of the charges of the rioting students. The United Press reported that Walker advised the mob to disperse. The Kennedys chose to believe the AP. That morning Walker was apprehended by Military Police, and arrested by the Feds. RFK charged Walker with insurrection and conspiracy, based only on the AP story.

38. Bond was set at $100K, and Walker's brother quickly began to raise the bail, but RFK suddenly ordered the Army to detain Walker at the US Medical Center for Federal Prisoners in Springfield, Missouri, which was a psychiatric hospital.

39. Walker was locked up under maximum security. Walker's lawyers claimed he was lucid, and Walker denied charges that he incited to riot.

40. Dr. Robert Morris reported that Walker was paranoid, because 'Walker thinks he's a political prisoner!' (Yet common sense saw that he really *was* a political prisoner!)

41. Ironically, the ACLU sued for Walker's release. Here was 'martyrdom' at the hands of RFK! This was the new 'psychiatric fascism'. Rightists fed the flames by charging that psychiatry makes people communists! Common sense agreed that if psychiatry were ever to become a political weapon, it would necessarily be an evil force.

42. On Wednesday 3, 1962, according to one report, Katzenbach tried to make a deal with Walker: freedom in exchange for silence. Walker replied: This is blackmail! Go to hell!

43. On Sunday, October 7, 1962, Walker was released. He returned to Dallas to a hero's welcome; 3,000 admirers and US flags flying. After a local doctor pronounced Walker to be 'very fit,' Walker immediately began giving speeches again.

44. On January 21, 1963, the White House dropped all charges against Walker. Then Walker sued AP for libel. Ultimately he won and was awarded $3 million.

45. But AP appealed to the Supreme Court, and ironically it was Supreme Court Justice Earl Warren who heard the case -- the very Judge for whom Walker had been demanding impeachment for years.

46. Supreme Court Justice Earl Warren threw out of court the case from the Birch Society leader, Edwin Walker, and Walker never saw a penny of that money.

47. Nevertheless, Walker returned to his lucrative speaking career, and continued to address thousands of people to standing ovations. It seemed that Walker would always be a favorite speaker of the extreme right wing in the USA.

48. Everything changed again for Edwin Walker when somebody took a pot-shot at Walker at his Dallas home on 4/10/1963.

49. Now, Marina Oswald said that Lee Oswald admitted being that shooter. However, General Walker - till the day he died - insisted that Lee Oswald was only one of his shooters on that day.

50. Neighbors reported two men escaping in a Ford sedan, and perhaps another escaping in a '58 Chevy from a Church parking lot. Walker continually sought who the other shooters were.

51. Dick Russell said that the other shooters were Larrie and Bob Schmidt - by Bob's own confession. If this is true, then here again we find Oswald consorting with rightists (not leftists) and also being part of a conspiracy and not a 'loner'.

52. George and Jeanne DeMohrenschildt confirmed for themselves that Lee Oswald was Walker's shooter when they visited the Oswalds at 10pm on 4/13/1963. They saw the rifle; they saw the guilty look on Lee Oswald's face when confronted with the question (even if only as a joke). They never saw the Oswald's again.

53. But George DeMohrenschildt did tell Mr. and Mrs. Igor Voshinin his suspicions that Oswald was Walker's shooter, and Mrs. Voshinin told the FBI immediately.

54. Later in 1963, Gerry Patrick Hemming reported that he saw the ex-General Edwin Walker at the Lake Pontchartrain mercenary training camp for Cuban Exiles who would try again to take over Cuba. JBS member, Guy Banister (a former chief of the FBI in Chicago) was also there. So was David Ferrie.

55. Was this a social visit, or was this a meeting to plan some sort of revenge on Lee Harvey Oswald?

56. Be that as it may - less than 24 hours after the assassination of JFK (as shown by FBI records available on the Mary Ferrell web site) General Walker conversed with neo-Nazi news editor, Helmut Muench, and told him that 'the same assassin who killed JFK was the same person who shot at me on 4/10/1963.'

57. We know this because Muench's newspaper, the Deutsche NationalZeitung, assigned newsman Hasslo Thorsten to interview Walker at length, and published this long interview in its 11/29/1963 issue. This issue is also among the FBI records.

58. Walker would say all of his life that he knew that Oswald was only one of his shooters, since some bullet fragments he found in his house were from a different rifle. Also, he knew that the government (the FBI, the CIA and RFK himself) knew about his shooting, and he would ask if RFK and the CIA were really the ones behind that attempted assassination.

59. Till the end of his life, Walker would tell people about the irony that Oswald tried to kill him in April, 1963, but since he was not pursued by RFK, the same Oswald killed JFK in November, 1963. So, ultimately, RFK had only himself to blame for the assassination.

Best regards,

--Paul Trejo

Edited by Paul Trejo
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Guest Robert Morrow

The very fact the Gen. Edwin Walker contacted the HSCA over the matter of the bullet in evidence not being the one shot at him makes me think that Walker was NOT involved in the JFK assassination. Being very quiet is something a plotter would do, not stir up the water.

Having said that Gen. Edwin Walker was good friends with H.L. Hunt who I think was at the core of the JFK assassination along with Lyndon Johnson, the CIA, Ed Lansdale, etc.

Normally, I would be very suspicious of Gen. Walker - I think his friends killed JFK. But I do not put him in the plot.

Likewise, I think it is extremely unlikely, less than 1% that Oswald shot at Walker. If Oswald is so furious about JFK's handling of the Bay of Pigs, the LAST person he would shot would be an ultra-rightist like Walker.

I think the "Oswald shot Walker" theory is absurd and a fantasy of the Warren Commission as they tried to pin everything on Oswald (JFK, Tippitt, Walker shooting).

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The very fact the Gen. Edwin Walker contacted the HSCA over the matter of the bullet in evidence not being the one shot at him makes me think that Walker was NOT involved in the JFK assassination. Being very quiet is something a plotter would do, not stir up the water.

Having said that Gen. Edwin Walker was good friends with H.L. Hunt who I think was at the core of the JFK assassination along with Lyndon Johnson, the CIA, Ed Lansdale, etc.

Normally, I would be very suspicious of Gen. Walker - I think his friends killed JFK. But I do not put him in the plot.

Likewise, I think it is extremely unlikely, less than 1% that Oswald shot at Walker. If Oswald is so furious about JFK's handling of the Bay of Pigs, the LAST person he would shot would be an ultra-rightist like Walker.

I think the "Oswald shot Walker" theory is absurd and a fantasy of the Warren Commission as they tried to pin everything on Oswald (JFK, Tippitt, Walker shooting).

The problem Walker had afa people looking for who in the militant right may have been involved was basically to deflect from the start, even before the event, and it seems if it was a building of one of the first rooms of smoke and mirrors, obviously it has had success.

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