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CE 573 "Walker Bullet" NOT the REAL Bullet ?


Gil Jesus
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We know Walker hated the Kennedys.I mean a ex General like Walker would have a big Ego as people in high positions usually do.With RFK having him detained in a mental institution would be like waving a red flag at a bull to him.

What if Walker,even though he hated JFK,was reluctant to join in a conspiracy to kill the President.If someone then takes a shot at Walker,and Walker believes the Kennedy's are behind it.That might just be enough to give him a shove to agree to a assassination.If indeed he was reluctant to do so in the first place.

Malcom, that's the same impression I get. For the rest of his life, General Walker told the Press that there were two shooters at his house that night, that Lee Harvey Oswald was only one of them, and that he strongly suspected that RFK had sent the CIA along with Oswald to get rid of Walker once and for all.

In Walker's opinion, JFK and RFK were Communists,pure and simple, just like President Eisenhower and his brother Milton were Communists, pure and simple.

In Walker's opinion, the Communists (Ike and JFK and RFK) were out to get Walker. His big 'crime' was that he tried to teach his Troops in Germany about Communism (through the John Birch Society) and since the Communsts could not stand to be exposed, they had to kill Walker.

This is not my opinion -- Walker truly believed this, and he made speech after speech telling this to the whole world -- to anybody who would listen. In the early 1960's he had a large audience, coast to coast. He was a favorite speaker at John Birch Society rallies, but also at White Citizen Council rallies, as well as Minute Men rallies. Walker made money telling people this story. This is documented history.

But Walker didn't spread this story just to make money -- he truly believed it himself.

Now -- as for his bullet -- some members of this Forum are convinced that Walker could not be involved in the JFK plot, because a true plotter would never call attention to himself. However, with Walker's complaint to the HSCA and Blakey that the bullet which Blakey showed on TV was not the actual bullet that Walker gave to the FBI on the night of the April shooting, some believe that General Walker was calling too much attention to himself to be a co-conspirator.

But such an argument underestimates General Walker. Walker urgently wanted people to know -- to truly believe -- that Oswald was his shooter as well as JFK's shooter. Why? Because if people saw Walker as a victim of Oswald, then they would hardly think of Walker as a co-conspirator.

That's why Walker himself -- on the very evening of the JFK assassination, spread the rumor through his friends in Dallas at the DPD, that Oswald was his April shooter (and that was reported on the morning of 23 November 1963 in the Dallas Morning News in a story with no by-line. Thanks to David Lifton for pointing this out).

That's why Walker had a transatlantic phone call with a German newspaper the very morning after the JFK assassination, telling them that Oswald was his April shooter (but that RFK set Oswald free in April), and that was reported in the weekend edition of the Deutsche Nationalzeitung.

That's why Walker spread the rumor through his friends in Dallas for the afternoon edition of the Dallas Times Herald, where it was publshed on 24 November 1963.

That's why Walker spread the rumor (in my opinion) through three different issues of the National Enquirer, with variations, to be printed in December, 1963, January 1964 and April 1964.

That's why Walker spread the rumor through the John Birch Society magazine, American Opinion, in their February and March 1964 issues.

Walker wanted to be sure the world knew it.

Therefore, when Warren Commission attorney, Wesley Liebeler, interviewed General Walker in July, 1964, he specifically asked Walker how Walker knew that Oswald was his April shooter so soon after JFK was killed -- when the FBI itself did not know that fact until December 3rd, when Marina Oswald confessed it.

Walker basically said that he and his friends simply 'guessed it.'

Well -- I don't believe they guessed it -- but that's another story. My point here is that it was important to the cover-up of the JFK conspiracy that people believed that Oswald had shot at both Walker and JFK. Walker could not let that point fade away.

By making Oswald into Walker's shooter as well, it was impossible to imagine that Walker was a plotter! How could a victim be a plotter? Impossible! This was the key for Walker, IMHO.

That's why, when Blakey, for the sake of the TV cameras in early 1979, held up a pristine bullet as the 'Walker' bullet, to again repeat the fiction that Oswald was a lone nut who went around shooting people -- that Walker hit the roof! Blakey was treating the all-important (to Walker) April bullet as a trivial symbol -- as something of secondary importance for history. By failing to show the actual bullet (whose photo links I posted above), Professor Blakey was trivalizing Walker's key argument!

The alleged shooting by Oswald at Walker in April, 1963, was the fact that removed all supicion of Walker's involvement in the assassination of JFK! Walker could not stand by and let it be trivialized! Walker could not let the argument fade away! At all costs he had to force the HSCA to dispay the actual bullet that they had on file, and not a trivial, pristine bullet for prime-time.

Best regards,

--Paul Trejo

<edit typos>

Edited by Paul Trejo
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So, Gil...the Dallas Police? I'm on board with that. But in my opinion, this places General Edwin Walker in the front row once again.

Best regards,

--Paul Trejo

I just doesn't make sense to me that Walker would be involved in a conspiracy to kill JFK, a conspiracy that included the selection of a patsy, then claim that the only type of bullet that the patsy's rifle could fire was not the bullet recovered from his house.

I would agree that Walker may have had foreknowledge of a plot to kill JFK, but his objection to CE 573 being the bullet leaves a question in my mind of how much involvement he had in the details of the plot.

IMO, it just seems to me that we can't have it both ways...we can't have Walker setting up Oswald on the one hand, then arguing against the evidence "proving" Oswald's guilt on the other.

I have no doubt that this was a Dallas-based plot to kill the President that had logistical support from elements of the Federal Government.

Part of that logistical support included the FBI's foreknowledge of a plot and allowing the murder to happen and the SS removing the President's protection.

This is the secret IMO that Hoover was trying to hide......they let it happen.

Gil

Does the so-called Walker bullet still exist? and where is it?

As far as I know, it's in the National Archives.

I have problems with the Oswald-shot-at-Walker story.

First, Marina's lack of credibility.

Second, the note wasn't dated.

Third, it was left in a place Oswald told Marina to keep away from.

Fourth, a witness saw two men fleeing the scene and neither was Oswald.

Fifth, the lead alloy in the Walker bullet did not match the lead alloy in the fragments allegedly removed from the limousine, meaning it was different ammo.

Sixth, when the FBI finally got around to investigating the shooting, they could not determine whether or not Oswald was the shooter.

Seventh, the recovered bullet could not be match to the depository rifle to the exclusion of all other weapons.

Eighth, the police report described the recovered bullet as steel jacketed and the Oswald ammo was copper jacketed.

Ninth, the newspapers quoted a police source as describing the bullet as a 30.06.

That's NINE reasons why I don't believe Oswald was involved in this shooting.

I agree that there is a paradox with Walker setting up Oswald then arguing against the ammunition, and his involvement in the JFK assassination. But that's only if you believe that the incidents are connected. What if they weren't ? Could Walker have been involved and yet not known the details of the assassination ? If Walker was setting up Oswald, he had to have known who Oswald was. Why wasn't Oswald considered a suspect in the shooting ? Why didn't he point the DPD in Oswald's direction ?

Instead, he conducted his own investigation into his own suspect. His investigators were able to retrieve .30 caliber cartridges from the home of Walker's suspect.

When the FBI canvassed the gun shops around Dallas after the assassination to ascertain which shops sold ammo for the 6.5 M-C rifle, it found that only two shops sold it. The DPD could have taken that mutilated bullet to shops, shown it, got an ID on the ammo, then traced back through gun shops and the post office if any 6.5 rifles had been sold to anyone.

My goodness. They had from April to November to find someone who would have used that type of ammunition.

But they didn't do that.

Because ( IMO ) the bullet they recovered was the more common and harder to trace 30.06.

Edited by Gil Jesus
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...I have problems with the Oswald-shot-at-Walker story.

First, Marina's lack of credibility.

Second, the note wasn't dated.

Third, it was left in a place Oswald told Marina to keep away from.

Fourth, a witness saw two men fleeing the scene and neither was Oswald.

Fifth, the lead alloy in the Walker bullet did not match the lead alloy in the fragments allegedly removed from the limousine, meaning it was different ammo.

Sixth, when the FBI finally got around to investigating the shooting, they could not determine whether or not Oswald was the shooter.

Seventh, the recovered bullet could not be match to the depository rifle to the exclusion of all other weapons.

Eighth, the police report described the recovered bullet as steel jacketed and the Oswald ammo was copper jacketed.

Ninth, the newspapers quoted a police source as describing the bullet as a 30.06.

That's NINE reasons why I don't believe Oswald was involved in this shooting.

I agree that there is a paradox with Walker setting up Oswald then arguing against the ammunition, and his involvement in the JFK assassination...

All good questions, Gil. Let's see if i can respond:

(1) I agree that if Marina is lying, then all bets are off about Oswald's participation in the Walker shooting. Today I accept that Oswald was Walker's shooter because Marina never changed her sworn testimony (and so is believable to me) but also because there was another alleged eye-witness, Larrie Schmidt's brother, Bob Schmidt. As Dick Russell reports (TMWKTM, 2003) Bob Schmidt confessed to the FBI that he and his brother drove Oswald to Walker's home to kill Walker. Russell suggests that Marina told the truth, but that Oswald lied *to her* when he said: (i) he acted alone; and (ii) he was on foot. Oswald wanted to keep her in the dark for purposes of secrecy.

(2) It seems OK to me that Oswald's note lacked a date - many of his writings lacked a date.

(3) Although Oswald left the note in his private space, which Marina was trained to avoid, it makes sense because if Oswald had been arrested, Marina would not have seen him all night long, and so the next place she would look would have been in his private space. But he he came back early, he could have destroyed the note without her notice of it. So, that was a smart place to leave the note. As it turned out, Marina looked in Oswald's private space simply because the clock struck 11pm.

(4) The witness that night (a young boy) could make no positive or negative identification about the shooters, since it was past 9pm, and because the shooters had fled to cars in the adjoining Church parking lot. The boy could only tell that those who fled were male and that there were three of them. Actually, the boy reported seeing three people, not two, fleeing the crime scene -- where the third person had a separate car and took his time in no particular rush. The boy failed to make out any facial features, however.

(5) As for the bullet itself, the Warren Commission discussed conflicting reports - one report said it had a steel jacket, and another report said it had a copper jacket. The fragment itself had a copper jacket. However, the FBI could not conclusively prove that this bullet came from Oswald's rifle. A dispute remains about it to this day. However, insofar as Larrie and Bob Schmidt were also involved in this shooting, and they were also military men, the shooter (even if it was Oswald) could have used the Schmidt's rifle.

(6) The FBI had no material proof that Oswald was the shooter -- but they had the sworn testimony of Marina that Oswald confessed it to her, and they had the interrogation of Bob Schmidt revealing that he and Larrie and Oswald shot at Walker together. It is bizarre that Larrie Schmidt was never called to testify for the Warren Commission, since Larrie Schmidt was behind the WELCOME MR. KENNEDY black-bordered ad in the Dallas Morning News on 22 November 1963. It is also bizarre that Bob Schmidt's confession was not reported by the Warren Commission, because the FBI surely had that confession, according to Dick Russell.

(7) Even FBI agent James Hosty confessed that the Walker bullet did not match Oswald's rifle to the exclusion of all other rifles. Yet, as I noted, another rifle could have been supplied by the Schmidt brothers.

(8) The Warren Commission noted the discrepancy in reports about the bullet's steel jacket or copper jacket. Their conclusion was that the officer who wrote 'steel jacket' was not an expert. By the way, here are two photographs of the Walker bullet, which still exists in the National Archives:

http://www.pet880.co...er_bullet_1.gif

http://www.pet880.co...er_bullet_2.gif

(9) Although the DPD also said the bullet was 30.06, Oswald's rifle could have fired a 30.06, but again, since Oswald was allegedly associated with other conspirators in the Walker shooting, we don't need to stick with Oswald's rifle.

(10) As for the paradox that Walker set up Oswald, I don't believe that at all. Walker was a victim in this shooting, and he was lucky to have escaped alive.

(11) Also, Walker didn't actually argue against the ammunition or police reports as such. As the documentation shows, Walker's February 1979 complaint to the HSCA was that in demonstrating the Walker bullet on television, the HSCA did not use the actual Walker bullet for the public (because it was so mutilated). Instead, they used a pristine, unfired bullet and showed it to the camera. That enraged General Walker who wrote to the HSCA by letter, telegram and through his lawyer, demanding that they never show that unfired bullet again, and instead show his unique Walker bullet. It was a tempest in a tea-pot, actually. Much ado about nothing.

(11.1) To demonstrate that my interpretation is correct, I submit the official FBI documentation at this URL:

http://www.pet880.co...r_Blakey_TV.pdf

(12) I personally believe the Walker shooting and the JFK shooting are connected - but in a special way.

(13) I believe that three nights after the shooting, George and Jeanne De Mohrenshildt obtained a reasonable suspicion that Oswald was Walker's shooter. This was the night before Easter, 1963. On Easter Sunday, George told his friends, Mr. and Mrs. Igor Voshinin, about their suspicions. The Voshinins immediately told the FBI.

(14) The policy of the FBI (or the prudence of an intelligence agent) would be to tell General Walker immediately to beware of this person.

(15) Therefore, General Walker knew as early as Easter Sunday, 1963, that Oswald was involved in this April shooting. Yet for some strange reason, the FBI failed to arrest Oswald.

(16) Therefore, General Walker chose to take matters into his own hands. This is when General Walker joined the throngs of JFK conspiracy buffs in 1963, and made a deal with Guy Banister to transform Lee Harvey Oswald into a patsy.

(17) In only two more weeks, Lee Harvey Oswald would be living in New Orleans, and working two blocks from Guy Banister.

Best regards,

--Paul Trejo

<added 11.1>

Edited by Paul Trejo
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Paul, I disagree with your Point #9 above. Oswald's rifle was a 6.5mm Carcano; it fired the 6.5x52 mm ammunition. To fire a 30.06 round, it would've needed some modification, as a 30.06 Springfield cartridge has quite different dimensions. At the base of the cartridge, the rim [which allows the spent casing to be ejected] is 11.45mm on the Carcano and 12.01mm on the 30.06; the diameter of the cartridge body is 10.94 on the Carcano, and 11.20 on the 30.06; the neck of the cartridge casing on the Carcano is 7.55mm on the Carcano, and 8.63mm on the 30.06; and the overall length of the cartridge on the Carcano is 76.50mm [maximum], whereas the 30.06 OAL is 84.84mm.

From those dimensions, I can conclude that your statement that "Oswald's rifle could have fired a 30.06" is without basis in fact. I believe it would have been impossible for Oswald's Carcano to have fired a 30.06 bullet...unless you know of some other rifle that was Oswald's.

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Paul, I disagree with your Point #9 above. Oswald's rifle was a 6.5mm Carcano; it fired the 6.5x52 mm ammunition. To fire a 30.06 round, it would've needed some modification, as a 30.06 Springfield cartridge has quite different dimensions. At the base of the cartridge, the rim [which allows the spent casing to be ejected] is 11.45mm on the Carcano and 12.01mm on the 30.06; the diameter of the cartridge body is 10.94 on the Carcano, and 11.20 on the 30.06; the neck of the cartridge casing on the Carcano is 7.55mm on the Carcano, and 8.63mm on the 30.06; and the overall length of the cartridge on the Carcano is 76.50mm [maximum], whereas the 30.06 OAL is 84.84mm.

From those dimensions, I can conclude that your statement that "Oswald's rifle could have fired a 30.06" is without basis in fact. I believe it would have been impossible for Oswald's Carcano to have fired a 30.06 bullet...unless you know of some other rifle that was Oswald's.

Mark, I defer to your detailed explanation. I now forget where I read that a Carcano could fire a 30.06, but that source was casual and not detailed or technical as your post.

So, thanks for the correction, Mark. I stand corrected. I now waive the first part of point #9. Yet I'll still stand by the second part of point #9, i.e. since Oswald had confederates in the Walker shooting, we don't need to postulate his Carcano at all.

Best regards,

--Paul Trejo

Edited by Paul Trejo
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Paul, I believe you're on the right track; it's just that over the years, a lot of statements have been made, such as the one stating [or implying] that the Carcano rifle in 6.5mm could fire a 7.62mm/.30 caliber round...and we can rebut a lot of these statements by researching a few easily-available facts. But please don't let this minor criticism get in the way of the work you're doing...which, IMHO, is for the most part excellent.

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Paul, I believe you're on the right track; it's just that over the years, a lot of statements have been made, such as the one stating [or implying] that the Carcano rifle in 6.5mm could fire a 7.62mm/.30 caliber round...and we can rebut a lot of these statements by researching a few easily-available facts. But please don't let this minor criticism get in the way of the work you're doing...which, IMHO, is for the most part excellent.

Mark, thanks for the encouragement. To concentrate further on this particular thread about whether the Walker bullet (held by NARA for the FBI) is the "real" bullet that Walker extracted from his home and gave to the DPD, I would like to focus on some pertinent documentation.

First, let's look again at the bullet itself, photographed at NARA:

The front side: http://www.pet880.co...er_bullet_1.gif

The back side: http://www.pet880.co...er_bullet_2.gif

We notice that it is very mutilated and hard to work with. According to ballistics, the bullet was fired from the wooden fence dividing Walker's back yard from the alley (as powder burns remained on the fence). Also, the bullet hit the window sill on its way inside Walker's house as it made its way to Walker's head. (There was bullet damage on the window sill). Yet because it hit the sill, it was deflected from its trajectory, and that is probably what saved Edwin Walker's life.

The bullet shot through the wall behind Walker, and settled in the bedroom behind the wall, and found in the condition we observe today -- very mutilated. Walker - a gunnery expert from before World War 2, through World War 2 and through Korea, picked up the bullet in his hands and examined it. He would never forget how it looked to him. Then Walker gave it to the Dallas Police. That was on 10 April 1963.

Walker's complaint to Blakey's HSCA in Februry, 1979, was quite simple. When the HSCA was demonstrating the Walker bullet on television, they did not use the actual Walker bullet for the TV audience (probably because it was so mutilated). Instead, they used a pristine, unfired bullet and showed that to the camera, as a symbol of the real bullet.

That simple act enraged General Walker! He promptly wrote to the HSCA by letter, telegram and through his lawyer, demanding that they never show that unfired bullet again! They must throw it away, and instead show his unique Walker bullet from now on!

That was what all the fuss was about. Nothing else. To demonstrate that my take on this topic is correct, I will provide the official FBI documentation gathered from February through June, 1979. Just click on this URL: http://www.pet880.co...r_Blakey_TV.pdf

It is several pages long, but a slow reading of this material should amply demonstrate that Walker's complaint made a mountain out of a mole hill.

Since you're technically minded, Mark, I'd like to ask if your reading of this documentation agrees with my take on this topic.

Best regards,

--Paul Trejo

<edit typos>

Edited by Paul Trejo
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Paul, additional kudos here for the work you are doing.

Would be interested in your take on one issue arising from the Walker incident that stands out to me. That issue is One Shot.

Why fire one round, and seeing that it missed it's mark, leave the scene with the job unfinished, if the original intention was to kill Walker?

(For the time being, I won't bring up another peripheral issue of missing a stationary target a short distance away, with basically unlimited time to select the best shooting location, focus and aim.)

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Paul, additional kudos here for the work you are doing.

Would be interested in your take on one issue arising from the Walker incident that stands out to me. That issue is One Shot.

Why fire one round, and seeing that it missed it's mark, leave the scene with the job unfinished, if the original intention was to kill Walker?

(For the time being, I won't bring up another peripheral issue of missing a stationary target a short distance away, with basically unlimited time to select the best shooting location, focus and aim.)

Richard, it's an interesting question. My approach to the Walker shooting relies mainly on Dick Russell and his book, TMWKTM, but also on the DPD report of the incident, also the Warren Commission testimony, also the HSCA booklet by George DM, I'm a Patsy! I'm a Patsy!, and to some degree on Ron Lewis' account of Lee Oswald's confession in New Orleans. Here's my take on it:

1. Volkmar Schmidt and George De Mohrenschildt (and perhaps Michael Paine) had been working on Lee Harvey Oswald since February, 1963 to get him to hate General Walker.

2. Volkmar told Oswald that if somebody had killed Hitler in time, the whole world would have been spared WW2.

3. George De Mohrenschildt started calling General Walker "General Fokker", and Lee Harvey Oswald starting calling him that, too.

4. It eventually worked. Oswald then bought weapons over the mail.

5. Oswald made a fake ID for himself (Alek Hidell) at his place of employment: Jaggers-Chiles-Stoval, a photocopying company in Dallas.

6. Oswald also had Marina take a photograph of himself holding his new weapons and two Communist newspapers (one of which had a scathing story about General Walker). Oswald then made variations of this photograph at J-C-S (which were so convincing that Marina later thought she must have taken more than one photo, although she didn't recall taking more than one).

7. Oswald also began taking pictures of Walker's home.

8. On the night of the shooting, Oswald did not act alone - he was with the brothers, Larrie and Bob Schmidt. (Bob worked for General Walker as a full-time, paid chauffer. Larrie had worked on the Overseas Weekly newspaper, and boasted that he was the one who got Walker fired from his Command over the 24th Infantry Division in Augsburg, Germany on 17 April 1961).

9. These three were little more than boys - their average age was ~24. They did not walk - they took the Schmidt brother's cars.

10. The shot was intended to kill -- it was far too close to be simply a "warning" shot, according to the DPD.

11. The reason the shot missed was because the bullet hit the window sill first, according to the DPD.

12. Larrie and Bob Schmidt were drunk (according to Schmidt according to Dick Russell). Their intent was to kill Walker, surely, and almost certainly to blame it on a Communist (Oswald). However, their personal frustration with General Walker was that Walker was uncooperative with their political plans to combine all the right-wing groups in Dallas under the CUSA organization of Larrie Schmidt. Walker refused to join anything except the John Birch Society. Also, Walker was secretly gay, and this might have irritated them. In other words, their motives to kill Walker were shallow and weak.

13. Oswald had been boasting that he was an excellent shot. (Perhaps the lighting was imperfect that night.)

14. When Oswald missed, the boys panicked and ran. (And they barely got away, because neighbors came running right away in this 'neighborhood watch' suburb.)

What was Walker's crime, in the eyes of the Walker-haters in Dallas? it was mainly that Walker had been the main instigator of the Ole Miss race riots of 30 September 1962, in which hundreds were wounded and two were killed. Also RFK sent Walker to a nut-house for a 90-day psychiatric evaluation, yet Walker's lawyers got him out in only five days, and RFK got a political black-eye from that.

Also, when Walker faced a Mississippi Grand Jury for his Ole Miss crimes, he was acquitted in a few weeks! He claimed he told the rioting crowds, "violence is not the way!" and so the Grand Jury let him go. (Also, his lawyers cleverly focused the trial on the topic of whether or not Walker was insane or not. Since he was clearly sane, then he was clearly innocent. It was a quick hearing.)

However, an eye-witness that night, Reverend Duncan Gray (now a Bishop), told me personally that, "if Walker said that, then he lied." Well, the Briscoe Center has part of those Grand Jury transcripts (which even NARA does not have, because all Grand Jury proceedings that don't result in litigation are destroyed after ten years) and I can assure you that Walker definitely said that. But Bishop Gray told me that it was he, Reverend Duncan Gray, who addressed the crowd that night and suggested, 'violence is not the way!" and Walker's response was to set the crowd on Reverend Gray to knock him down, kick him and beat him up! (Sadly, Reverend Gray was not called to testify before the Grand Jury - which was not publicized.)

Anyway - those people who hated Walker truly hated him. The Ole Miss riots were an embarrassment to the USA in the Cold War (since Walker's main goal was to embarrass JFK). Oswald learned to hate Walker. He wanted to kill Walker and he purchased the means (the weapons). The Schmidt brothers supplied the opportunity (the encouragement and the cars, and perhaps a different rifle).

Oswald missed - and all three men ran. That's the story as we get it from Dick Russell in all his editions of TMWKTM.

Best regards,

--Paul Trejo

<edit typos>

Edited by Paul Trejo
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  • 3 years later...

...I believe the DALLAS COPS were involved in setting Oswald up and the framing of Oswald ( albeit post-mortem ) was continued by the FBI.

Well, Gil, you wrote this almost four years ago -- do you still maintain this theory?

I ask because I'm coming around to it myself. I've got Walt Brown's Treachery in Dallas (1995) that touches on this. Do you recommend another source?

I also have William Turner's Power On the Right (1971) that says no DPD officer could join the force in the early 1960's without some far right wing membership, e.g. the KKK or Minutemen.

Edwin Walker was a leader of the Minutemen in Dallas -- and in his plot to kill JFK he would need faithful followers. Nobody was better suited than DPD officers, who knew Dallas like the backs of their hands, and would get instant protection from other DPD officers, like a brotherhood.

As for the FBI, they had orders from the Director to tamper with all JFK evidence to show only a :"Lone Nut" Oswald with "no accomplices who are still at large." This was after the fact.

Before the fact, however, was the DPD, and an overall plan conceived by, IMHO, General Walker.

Regards,

--Paul Trejo

Edited by Paul Trejo
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