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Nixon Operative Roger Stone on JFK Assassination: "LBJ had it done. Mob, CIA, Hoover, all in on it. RFK knew. So did Nixon."


Guest Robert Morrow
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Guest Robert Morrow

I recently emailed Roger Stone, Nixon confidant and longtime and notorious GOP operative, my essay 'LBJ-CIA Assassination of JFK." Or rather, I tweeted it to him.

My essay: http://lyndonjohnsonmurderedjfk.blogspot.com/2011/12/lbj-cia-assassination-of-jfk-updated.html

Here is Roger Stone's "tweet" back to me on January 9, 2012:

"LBJ had it done. Mob, CIA, Hoover, all in on it. RFK knew. So did Nixon."

This comes from a man who was very, very, very close to Richard Nixon. Obviously, I need to follow up on this but I thought I would share it with you first.

You can google "Roger Stone Richard Nixon" and learn more about Stone.

Roger Stone was very close to Nixon. I would not be surprised if he had personal, private talks with Nixon about the JFK assassination.

Stone even has a tattoo of Nixon on his upper back; that is how vested he is in Nixon.

Nixon knew the truth about what LBJ and CIA had done. In fact, that was his firewall defense in Watergate – don’t investigate me or the “whole Bay of Pigs thing” is going to come out.

Nixon used to tell his operatives never, ever take any money from H.L. Hunt. I think one big reason for that was he knew that Hunt would then think he owned Nixon, and also Nixon was aware of Hunt’s role in the JFK assassination.

There is another longtime GOP operative named Jack Wheeler – his web site is “To The Point News.” Wheeler is a longtime GOP insider. Wheeler is also close friends with Jeb Bush. I once corresponded with Wheeler on this matter; he told me he had always suspected Lyndon Johnson in the JFK assassination.

Here is a brief bio of Roger Stone: http://biggovernment.com/author/rstone/

Roger Stone:

Roger Stone is a legendary American Republican political consultant who has played a key role in the election of Republican presidents from Richard Nixon to Ronald Reagan to George H. W. Bush and George W. Bush.

Stone is credited with the public relations rehabilitation of President Richard M. Nixon after his resignation in 1974. Stone first worked for Nixon as Chairman of Connecticut Youth for Nixon/Agnew in 1968 and graduating to a position in Nixon's 1972 reelection campaign which won 49 out of 50 states.

In 1976 Stone was named National Director of Youth for Reagan, a division of Governor Ronald Reagan's 1976 Presidential campaign. In 1978, Stone co-founded the National Conservative Political Action Committee [NCPAC] where he is credited with developing the negative campaign into an art form and pioneering the use of negative campaign advertising which Mr. Stone calls "comparative, not negative."

Starting in 1979, Stone served as Regional Political Director for Governor Reagan's 1980 campaign for President handling New York, New Jersey and Connecticut, his native State. Stone became known for his expertise and strategies for motivating and winning ethnic and Catholic voters.

Stone went on to serve in the same capacity in Reagan's 1984 reelection campaign adding responsibility for Pennsylvania and Ohio to the states Stone managed in 1980. He went on to serve as a Senior Consultant for California for President George H. W. Bush's campaign.

In 2000 Stone is credited with the hard-ball tactics which resulted in closing down the Miami-Dade Presidential recount. Stone is credited in HBO's recent movie, "Recount 2000" with fomenting the so-called "Brooks Brothers Riot" in which a Republican mob swarmed the recount demanding a shutdown while thousands of Cuban-Americans marched outside the Courthouse demanding the same thing.

Stone has worked for numerous Republican US Senators like Senator Arlen Specter as well as pro-American political parties in Eastern Europe, Africa, and the Caribbean. He is consulted regularly on communications and corporate and public relations strategy by fortune 500 ECO's and pro-democracy foreign leaders.

Stone has been profiled in the Weekly Standard, The New Yorker, and the Miami Herald in 2007 and 2008. Mr. Stone has written for the New York Times Sunday Magazine, The New York Times Op Ed page and for Newsmax.com. He has appeared frequently on FOX News, NBC Nightly News, CNN, MSNBC, and the Today Show. Stone is the editor and publisher of STONEzone.com.

Edited by Robert Morrow
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Guest Robert Morrow

Robert,

Your posting has a lot of background on Roger Stone, who I know of.

However, the only "revelation" in your post was a tweet that said LBJ 'did it'.

I'm not sure why you're posting this. I would hardly call a tweet from anyone,

let alone a 'player' like Stone, a smoking gun.

On top of that, even if LBJ 'did it' (which I don't believe), I doubt that Stone

is going to be privy to such information, regardless of his tattoos.

Roger Stone was VERY close to Richard Nixon and spent a lot of person-to-person time with. There is no telling what Nixon told him about what he knew about the JFK assassination. It is not kind of obvious that one would want to know what a close associate to Richard Nixon, especially a "player" like Stone, would think about the JFK assassination? Perhaps Nixon spilled the whole ball of wax to Stone in a moment of candor! Or, more likely, dropped some useful nuggets.

I have sent an email to Stone to see if he would expand on what Nixon knew about the JFK assassination.

I don't know if you are aware of some things Richard Nixon said about the JFK assassination. Howard Baker once asked Nixon "What do you know aobut the Kennedy Assassination" and Nixon replied "You don't want to know."

[source: Oral History Interview with DON HEWITT, October 8, 2002, New York, NY, By Vicki Daitch For the John F. Kennedy Library]

And then there is Nixon's reference's to the "whole Bay of Pigs thing" in the Watergate smoking gun tape. http://mtracy9.tripod.com/kennedy.html

Transcript of Nixon's Watergate "Smoking Gun Tape" (dated June 23, 1972) http://watergate.info/tapes/72-06-23_smoking-gun.shtml

Nixon is obviously referring to the JFK Assassination whenever he said the "whole Bay of Pigs thing."

Then there is the whole matter of the missing 18 minutes of tape that got erased from other Nixon tapes. I think it is *very reasonable* to assume that those 18 minutes were conversation explicitly relating to the role of the CIA or Lyndon Johnson in the JFK assassination.

Note: I do not think Nixon was involved in the JFK assassination, but I do think that he was fully aware that LBJ, Hoover, the Texas oil men and the CIA were.

Quoting Mark Tracy:

Other facts linking Nixon to the JFK assassination emerged years later during the Watergate conspiracy, some of which were revealed by Nixon's former chief of staff, H. R. Haldeman in his memoir, The Ends of Power. Haldeman cites several conversations where Nixon expressed concern about the Watergate affair becoming public knowledge and where this exposure might lead. Haldeman writes:

"In fact, I was puzzled when he [Nixon] told me, 'Tell Ehrlichman this whole group of Cubans [Watergate burglars] is tied to the Bay of Pigs.' After a pause I said, 'The Bay of Pigs? What does that have to do with this [the Watergate burglary]?' But Nixon merely said, 'Ehrlichman will know what I mean,' and dropped the subject."

Later in his book, Haldeman appears to answer his own question when he says, "It seems that in all of those Nixon references to the Bay of Pigs, he was actually referring to the Kennedy assassination."

If Haldeman's interpretation is correct, then Nixon's instructions for him to, "Tell Ehrlichman this whole group of [anti-Castro] Cubans is tied to the Bay of Pigs," was Nixon's way of telling him to inform Ehrlichman that the Watergate burglars were tied to Kennedy's murder. (It should be noted that many Cuban exiles blamed Kennedy for the failure to overthrow Castro at the Bay of Pigs, pointing to Kennedy's refusal to allow the U.S. military to launch a full-scale invasion of the island.)

Haldeman also links the Central Intelligence Agency to the Watergate burglars and, by implication, to the Kennedy assassination. Haldeman writes, "...at least one of the

burglars, [Eugenio] Martinez, was still on the CIA payroll on June 17, 1972 -- and

almost certainly was reporting to his CIA case officer about the proposed break-in even before it happened [his italics]."

The other Watergate conspirators included ex-FBI agent G. Gordon Liddy, ex-CIA agents James McCord and E. Howard Hunt, and Bay of Pigs veterans Bernard Barker, Frank Sturgis and Virgilio Gonzales. E. Howard Hunt's relationship with the anti-Castro Cubans traces back to the early 1960s, to his days with the Central Intelligence Agency. As a CIA political officer and propaganda expert, Hunt helped plan the Bays of Pigs operation and also helped create the Cuban Revolutionary Council -- a militant anti-Castro organization. Hunt would later retire from the CIA (at least ostensibly) to become covert operations chief for the Nixon White House. [Note: Hunt maintained a working relationship with the Central Intelligence Agency even after his "retirement," obtaining camera equipment and disguises from the CIA's Technical Services Division for use in the Watergate burglary.]

Several reports over the years have placed Hunt in Dallas at the time of the Kennedy assassination. In 1974, the Rockefeller Commission concluded that Hunt used eleven hours of sick leave from the CIA in the two-week period preceding the assassination. Later, eyewitness Marita Lorenz testified under oath that she saw Hunt pay off an assassination team in Dallas the night before Kennedy's murder. (Hunt v. Liberty Lobby; U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Florida; 1985) Click to read transcript

In taped conversations with Haldeman, Nixon is obviously worried about what would happen if Hunt's involvement in the Watergate conspiracy came to light. Nixon says, "Of course, this Hunt, that will uncover a lot of things. You open that scab, there's a hell of a lot of things, and we feel that it would be very detrimental to have this thing go any further ... the President's belief is that this is going to open the whole Bay of Pigs thing up again." Click to Listen: Nixon instructs Haldeman on what to tell the CIA (text below)

NIXON: When you get in to see these people, say: "Look, the problem is that this will open the whole, the whole Bay of Pigs thing, and the President just feels that..." ah, I mean, without going into the details of, of lying to them to the extent to say that there is no involvement. But, you can say, "This is sort of a comedy of errors, bizarre," without getting into it, "The President's belief is that this is going to open the whole Bay of Pigs thing up again. And, ah because ah these people are playing for, for keeps and that they should call the FBI in and we feel that ... that we wish for the country, don't go any further into this case, period!"

Following instructions, Haldeman informed CIA Director Richard Helms of Nixon's concern that the Watergate investigation would "open the whole Bay of Pigs thing up again." Haldeman gives this account of what transpired next: "Turmoil in the room. Helms, gripping the arms of his chair, leaning forward and shouting, 'The Bay of Pigs had nothing to do with this. I have no concern about the Bay of Pigs.' "Silence. I just sat there. I was absolutely shocked by Helms' violent reaction. Again I wondered, what was such dynamite in the Bay of Pigs story?"

Eleven days after Hunt's arrest for the Watergate burglary, L. Patrick Gray, acting FBI Director, was called to the White House and told by Nixon aide John Ehrlichman to "deep six" written files taken from Hunt's personal safe. The FBI Director was told that the files were "political dynamite and clearly should not see the light of day." Gray responded by taking the material home and burning it in his fireplace. John Dean, council to the president, acted similarly by shredding Hunt's operational diary.

Futhermore, as former White House correspondent Don Fulsom reveals, "The newest Nixon tapes are studded with deletions -- segments deemed by government censors as too sensitive for public scrutiny. 'National Security' is cited. Not surprisingly, such deletions often occur during discussions involving the Bay of Pigs, E. Howard Hunt, and John F. Kennedy. One of the most tantalizing nuggets about Nixon's possible inside knowledge of JFK assassination secrets was buried on a White House tape until 2002. On the tape, recorded in May of 1972, the president confided to two top aides that the Warren Commission pulled off 'the greatest hoax that has ever been perpetuated.' Unfortunately, he did not elaborate."

John Kennedy to Malcolm Kilduff

Edited by Robert Morrow
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Oh, I believe that Nixon knew about the assassination. I was just

questioning the path from Nixon's tangential knowledge through

a friend, into a tweet to, I presume, an acquaintance. Unless Stone

presents some evidence, it's about as close to hearsay as you get.

Hey, at least we have a true provenance, a chain of evidence that we can link back to Stone, even though it goes through WM's tweets.

From my Margate friends who shared the same beach with Stone (Thong Beach), the statements attributed to him are certainly compatible with his style and personality.

Stone is an old-school political strategists who likes to create big projects, doll out jobs, control the unions, suck money from the industrialists, bribe the right people and use dirty tricks against any opposition, and once you achieve power, don't give it up, ala Nucky Johnson, a fellow Republican.

I'm going to be writing more about Stone and his Atlantic City connections so stay tuned.

Center/Study of Political Assassinations

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Guest Robert Morrow

Oh, I believe that Nixon knew about the assassination. I was just

questioning the path from Nixon's tangential knowledge through

a friend, into a tweet to, I presume, an acquaintance. Unless Stone

presents some evidence, it's about as close to hearsay as you get.

Exact what is wrong with "hearsay?" That is how you find out stuff, especially from people who HEARD someone SAY something. "Hearsay" is usually the first thing that puts you on the path to the truth (or misinformation, I will grant).

Like Linda Tripp talking to Monica Lewinsky and her affairs with Bill Clinton. Now that was just a bunch of "hearsay." But it was dead-on right. The much maligned "hearsay" is often golden.

I have emailed Roger Stone to see if he will talk with me, have not heard back yet.

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Guest Robert Morrow

The trouble is - with all respects to Robert Morrow and his research - hearsay many times is not detailed enough to satisfy or inform, which reduces its power to establish or confirm. Barr McClellan's limited revelations come to mind.

Barr McClellan is a very important witness to truth in the JFK assassination. He is a witness. McClellan tells us that the inner core of LBJ's law firm - the Ed Clark law firm - were convinced that Lyndon Johnson killed JFK. That's important. It is important to know what Ed Clark was saying about getting oil leases "for Dallas" (i.e. for organizing the JFK assassination). It is important to know that Don Thomas, a right hand man for LBJ, said I took care of Box 13 and as for Dallas, it was Ed Clark.

"Hearsay" to some folks; critical eyewitness testimony to others.

Barr McClellan is important NOT because of his book; McClellan is important because he was a first hand "witness" to what Ed Clark, Don Thomas and others in LBJ's law firm were saying.

I think it is highly plausible, highly likely that Ed Clark and LBJ both conspired with the Texas oil men to use their collective CIA/military/mob connections to kill Kennedy. From my perch, that is the core of the JFK assassination.

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I hear you Robert - but Billy Sol Estes or Bobby Baker could do more for the truth than Barr McClellan was in position to do (or, that he let on that he was only in position to do).

McClellan's stuff was an anecdote for somebody else's book, not a basis for that half-empty book of his own. His great revelation was accomplished in only two pages: LBJ was a ruthless, murdering, grafting crook. He hooked up with oilmen to get intel and mob types to kill JFK. Cliff Carter sat in a locked room and hooked up LBJ's bribes and rubouts. Carter told all this, all too briefly, to McClellan. All of it I'd either read elsewhere, or heard from McClellan himself in a couple of book-plugging TV interviews. Honestly - I've read longer testimony in tattoos.

Keep up the good work - I'm a reader. Barr ought to have given everybody better material to work with.

Edited by David Andrews
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Thanks, Bill.

BTW, have you ever posted your thesis on the Bay of Pigs?

I did my thesis on the Bay of Pigs for a senior year Latin American History class under Dr. Bruce Taylor at the University of Dayton (Ohio), and no longer have a copy of it.

I have learned a lot about the Bay of Pigs since then however, and have changed my perspective of it from a covert op that got to big and out of hand, to one that was designed to fail.

The facts that the target beach was changed at the last minute from one near the mountains to the Bay of PIgs as well as the fact that it was well publicized before hand and John Martino, in a Cuban prison, knew the D-day date, certainly implies that the whole deal was doomed, and those who planned it planned it to fail.

Those who have an interest in understanding the assassination of President Kennedy must first know the basic background of some other historical events - especially the Guatemala Coup of 1954, the U2 incident, the Bay of Pigs and the Cuban Missile Crisis, all of which are dominoes in the fall of JFK.

BK

JFKcountercoup

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Exact what is wrong with "hearsay?" That is how you find out stuff, especially from people who HEARD someone SAY something. "Hearsay" is usually the first thing that puts you on the path to the truth (or misinformation, I will grant).

Like Linda Tripp talking to Monica Lewinsky and her affairs with Bill Clinton. Now that was just a bunch of "hearsay." But it was dead-on right. The much maligned "hearsay" is often golden.

I have emailed Roger Stone to see if he will talk with me, have not heard back yet.

About Clinton it went to more than just hearsay. Monica had a dress she kept with Clinton's ejaculate on it.

I know people around here argue with you all of the time, but I believe you are working hard, moreso than they. Keep up the good work.

Kathy C

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Those who have an interest in understanding the assassination of President Kennedy must first know the basic background of some other historical events - especially the Guatemala Coup of 1954, the U2 incident, the Bay of Pigs and the Cuban Missile Crisis, all of which are dominoes in the fall of JFK.

And to this worthy list I'd add the Laotian Accords Geneva '62 and the Diem coup.

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Those who have an interest in understanding the assassination of President Kennedy must first know the basic background of some other historical events - especially the Guatemala Coup of 1954, the U2 incident, the Bay of Pigs and the Cuban Missile Crisis, all of which are dominoes in the fall of JFK.

And to this worthy list I'd add the Laotian Accords Geneva '62 and the Diem coup.

Let’s not forget that despite some failed attempts at revisionist history here not only did JFK back the Diem coup but so did his only two anti-war advisors George Ball and J.K. Galbraith.

Also I'm curious how did events during Ike's term as POTUS put the nails in his successor's coffin?

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