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Good Day.... FYI....

http://www.miamihera...assination.html

<QUOTE>

Fresh meat for JFK assassination hounds

There's only one certainty about historians of the Kennedy assassination: They're a contentious lot.

BY GLENN GARVIN

GGARVIN@MIAMIHERALD.COM

There's an old joke about economists — if you took every single one in the world and laid them all end-to-end, they still wouldn't reach a conclusion — that could also probably be told about historians of the Kennedy assassination. Their books are often fiercely contentious, festooned with bitter criticism of one another.

Brian Latell's book Castro's Secrets: The CIA And Cuba's Intelligence Machine will doubtless have its own legions of bitter critics and stalwart defenders. Already the book's thesis — that Fidel Castro knew in advance that Lee Harvey Oswald planned to take a shot at President Kennedy that day in Dallas — is stirring up arguments among old assassination hands.

"The notion of Castro being in any way connected to the assassination is preposterous on its face," snorts Vincent Bugliosi, the former California prosecutor who put mass murderer Charles Manson in jail and is the author of an encyclopedic 1.5-million-word book on the assassination called Reclaiming History.

"The notion that Castro would do something that would result in the blowing up of his own country — which is exactly what would have happened if anyone found out — is just crazy.... There's no evidence he knew what was on Oswald's mind. Oswald himself did not know what was on his mind."

Like Bugliosi, Edward Jay Epstein — author of the recent e-book The JFK Assassination Theories, as wells as three trailblazing works published between 1966 and 1978 — hasn't read Castro's Secrets yet. (It won't reach stores for another month.) But he thinks a Castro connection to Kennedy's death is not only plausible, but likely.

"There is no doubt that Castro knew about the CIA plans to assassinate him, and he warned the American government that he knew by telling a reporter about it," Epstein said. "If a Mafia leader did that same thing, and the next day the other guy was found dead, that would be a prima facie case and he'd be the lead suspect."

Gus Russo, author of two books of his own (Live By The Sword and Brothers In Arms) that tie the assassination to Castro, using some of the same evidence that Latell does, agrees: "Most people do agree that Kennedy was trying to murder Castro. So why isn't Castro the No. 1 suspect?"

Miami Beach writer Gerald Posner is author of the enormously popular and influential Case Closed, which debunked some of the most popular assassination conspiracy theories. Nonetheless, Posner thinks Latell may be onto something. "If there's an area of the case where something new still could emerge, it's the part connected to the CIA and Castro," he said. "There's always a possibility that the Cubans knew what Oswald was going to do because of his visit to their embassy in Mexico City. And if the Cubans knew, so did the Soviets and so did the CIA, because they were all monitoring each other like crazy. You could have a whole new ballgame."

But any scenario involving Castro even indirectly in the assassination is unlikely, argues Peter Kornbluh, director of the Cuba Documentation Project at the National Security Archive and author of several books about U.S.-Cuba relations in the Kennedy era. "In the last several months of his life, Kennedy sent several peace feelers to Castro," Kornbluh said. "Kennedy even had a guy in Cuba [French journalist Jean Daniel] talking to Castro about rapprochement at the moment of the assassination. Why would Castro want to do anything that encourage the murder of the first American president willing to talk about coexistence with the Cuban revolution?"

Historian Max Holland, however, isn't impressed with that argument. "Yes, Kennedy was quietly talking peace, but at the same time there's no doubt there was a plan for engineering a military coup in Cuba, as a part of which Castro would be killed," said the author of The Kennedy Assassination Tapes. "These two things may seem contradictory, but I'm not sure they really were. I think the idea was to make Castro lower his guard, make him think we weren't after him, and then...well, get him."

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.... and, the same-day article ....

http://www.miamihera...nation-did.html

<QUOTE>

The Kennedy assassination: Did Castro know in advance?

A new book by former CIA analyst Brian Latell details evidence that Cuban intelligence knew beforehand of JFK's assassination

BY GLENN GARVIN

GGARVIN@MIAMIHERALD.COM

PHOTO http://media.miamihe...hsBqA.St.56.jpg

On Jan. 1, 1962, more than a year before the assassination, Cubans held a mock funeral for a still very-much-alive JFK, a reflection of tensions between Cuba and the United States.

PHOTO http://media.miamihe...9eWrN.St.56.jpg

A Miami Herald story two months before the assassination quotes Fidel Castro alluding to America's efforts to kill him and warning of consequences. Miami Herald archive

PHOTO http://media.miamihe...mDNQ6.St.56.jpg

After Lee Harvey Oswald was arrested but before details about him were published, Cuban intelligence offcials knew a great deal about him, wiretaps showed. Tom Dillard / © Tom Dillard/Dallas Morning New

THE AUTHOR

Brian Latell began tracking Cuba for the CIA in the 1960s. Today he does his Cuba watching from the University of Miami.

The orders surprised the Cuban intelligence officer. Most days in his tiny communications hut, just outside Fidel Castro's isolated family compound on the west side of Havana, were spent huddled over his radio gear, trolling the island's airwaves for the rapid-fire bursts of signals that were the trademark of CIA spies and saboteurs, pinpointing their location for security forces.

But now his assignment had abruptly been changed, at least for the day. "The leadership wants you to stop your CIA work, all your CIA work," his boss said. Instead, the officer was told he had a new target: Texas, "any little detail small detail from Texas." And about three hours later, shortly after mid-day on Nov. 22, 1963, the shocked intelligence officer had something to report that was much more than a small detail: the assassination in Dallas of President John F. Kennedy.

"Castro knew," the intelligence officer would tell a CIA debriefer years later, after defecting to the United States. "They knew Kennedy would be killed."

The defector's tale is reported in a book to be published next month by retired CIA analyst Brian Latell, the agency's former national intelligence officer for Latin America and now a senior research associate at the University of Miami's Institute for Cuban and Cuban American Studies.

The book, Castro's Secrets: The CIA and Cuba's Intelligence Machine, is the first substantial study of Fidel Castro's intelligence operations. Based on interviews with Cuban spies who defected as well as declassified documents from the CIA, the FBI, the Pentagon and other national security organs, it contains a good deal of material likely to stir controversy, including accounts of how Castro's spies have carried out political murders, penetrated the U.S. government and generally outwitted their American counterparts.

But nothing is more potentially explosive than Latell's claim that Kennedy's assassin, Lee Harvey Oswald, warned Cuban intelligence officers in advance of his plans to kill the president. Latell writes that Oswald, a belligerent Castro supporter, grew frustrated when officials at the Cuban embassy in Mexico City refused to give him a visa to travel to the island, and promised to shoot Kennedy to prove his revolutionary credentials.

"Fidel knew of Oswald's intentions — and did nothing to deter the act," the book declares.

Even so, Latell maintains his work is sober and even reserved. "Everything I write is backed up by documents and on-the-record sources," he told The Miami Herald. "There's virtually no speculation. I don't say Fidel Castro ordered the assassination, I don't say Oswald was under his control. He might have been, but I don't argue that, because I was unable to find any evidence for that.

"But did Fidel want Kennedy dead? Yes. He feared Kennedy. And he knew Kennedy was gunning for him. In Fidel's mind, he was probably acting in self-defense."

If Latell's prose is sober, the events it describes are anything but. Castro's Secrets, to be published by Palgrave Macmillan, explores a confusing and deadly chapter of the 1960s when the Cold War nearly turned hot. The United States, fearful that Castro's revolution would provide the Soviet Union a toehold in the Western Hemisphere, backed a bloody invasion of anti-communist Cuban exiles at the Bay of Pigs. The Soviets put nuclear missiles in Cuba, which left the entire world teetering on the brink of war for two weeks.

And even when everyone took a step back, U.S.-supported raids and sabotage continued in Cuba. The CIA hatched several plots to kill Castro, using everything from poisoned cigars to exploding sea shells, and Castro offered chilling hints that he might be planning to respond in kind. "U.S. leaders should think that if they are aiding terrorist plans to eliminate Cuban leaders, they themselves will not be safe," he told an American reporter in September 1963.

Against that backdrop, suspicions of a Cuban connection to the Kennedy assassination were only natural. And they were heightened by the erratic activities of Oswald, a lifelong Marxist who left the Marine Corps in 1959 to defect to the Soviet Union, where he attempted to renounce his U.S. citizenship and married a Russian woman whose uncle was a colonel in military intelligence.

By 1963, Oswald had returned to the United States. But just a few months before Kennedy's death, at a time when tensions between Havana and Washington simmered only slightly below war temperature, Oswald's outspoken public support for Cuba — he had staged several one-man demonstrations and even scuffled with members of an anti-Castro group — had come to the attention of the news media in New Orleans, where he was living at the time.

And he had also attracted the attention of the CIA, which had the Mexico City embassies of Cuba and the Soviet Union under tight surveillance. The agency spotted Oswald at both embassies on multiple visits between Sept. 27 and Oct. 2, 1963, as he sought visas to travel to either country.

Those visits — particularly to the Cuban embassy, where Oswald took a scrapbook of newspaper clippings and other documents to demonstrate his support for Castro's revolution in hopes of winning a visa — were among evidence considered by three major federal investigations of the Kennedy assassination in the 1960s and '70s. All ultimately rejected (though sometimes only after fierce internal debate) the idea of any causal link between Castro and the crime.

But Latell's book makes some new revelations and adds detail to older ones in making the argument that Castro played at least an indirect role in the assassination. Among them:

• The disclosure by Florentino Aspillaga, the most valuable defector ever to flee Cuba's DGI intelligence service, that the DGI had asked him to drop radio surveillance of the CIA hours before the assassination to focus on signals from Texas. Aspillaga told his CIA debriefers about the change in surveillance when he defected in 1987, but that information remained secret until he repeated the story to Latell in interviews for the book.

• The report of a deeply embedded FBI spy who worked as top-level international courier for the Communist Party USA that Castro, during a meeting five months after the assassination, admitted that Oswald had threatened Kennedy's life during his visit to the Cuban embassy in Mexico.

The spy, Jack Childs, who was awarded a posthumous Presidential Medal of Freedom for his quarter-century of spying against Moscow and Havana, reported to the FBI that Castro told him Oswald "stormed into the embassy, demanded the visa, and when it was refused to him headed out saying, "I'm going to kill Kennedy for this!"

• The CIA's now-declassified report of its 1964 debriefing of another DGI defector, Vladimir Rodriguez Ladera. At the time, Castro was claiming that Oswald's visit to the Cuban embassy in Mexico had been a minor matter that didn't come to the attention of senior officials in Havana. "We never in our life heard of him," Castro said in a speech strongly denying that the Cuban government knew anything about Oswald beyond what was in the newspapers.

But Rodriguez Ladera, the defector, told the CIA that Castro was surely lying, because the news of Oswald's arrest set DGI headquarters instantly abuzz. "It caused much comment concerning the fact that Oswald had been in the Cuban embassy," he said. And because the embassy in Mexico City was a major staging ground for Cuban espionage against the United States as well as the rest of Latin America, Rodriguez Ladera added, even the most routine matters there were regularly reported directly to Castro.

• CIA wiretaps and microphones honeycombing the Cuban embassy in Mexico City captured conversations between DGI officers that showed a surprisingly detailed knowledge of Oswald's background in the first hours after the assassination, when relatively little of it had been reported in the press.

At the center of the chatter was Luisa Calderon, a pretty, English-speaking DGI officer in her early 20s who had lived in Miami with her parents throughout the 1950s. Barely four hours after the assassination, she got a phone call from a man, also apparently a DGI spy. He asked if she knew what had happened in Dallas. "Yes, of course," she answered. "I knew of it almost before Kennedy did." Her caller continued to chatter away, noting correctly that Oswald spoke Russian and had written to Castro offering to join his fighting forces in 1959. Latell believes the speed and depth of those comments show that the DGI maintained a file on Oswald and was well acquainted with him.

The wiretaps also demonstrate something about the way Cuban intelligence officers regarded Kennedy. "Wonderful! What good news!" Calderon said to another caller who mentioned the assassination, before breaking into laughter at the news — untrue, as it would turn out — that Kennedy's wife and brother had also been wounded. "He was a family man, yes, but also a degenerate aggressor," Calderon added, to which her caller exclaimed, "Three shots in the face!" Replied Calderon: "Perfect!"

• In what may be the most intriguing element of his book, Latell concludes that Rolando Cubela, a high-ranking Cuban official recruited by the CIA to assassinate Castro — an act the agency hoped would trigger a military rebellion — was actually a double agent, feeding every detail of U.S. plans back to Havana. Castro's knowledge that his own murder was being plotted by the highest level of the American government, Latell writes, is what led to his "conspiracy of silence" about Oswald's assassination plan.

"Fidel Castro was running the most important double agent operation in the history of intelligence," Latell said. "He wanted definitive proof that Kennedy was trying to kill him. And he got it." In a brutal irony, the CIA was delivering to Cubela a poison-tipped ballpoint pen with which to kill Castro at the very moment that Oswald was shooting Kennedy.

Two major pieces of evidence implicate Cubela as a double agent, Latell writes. One was a recently declassified lie-detector test administered to Cubela's best friend and frequent co-conspirator in CIA adventures, the late Coral Gables jeweler Carlos Tepedino. Tepedino, during a confrontational interrogation by CIA handlers in 1965, confessed that Cubela was still "cooperating'' with Cuban intelligence and had never tried to organize a military revolt against Castro.

Tepedino's story was more than confirmed, Latell writes, by conversations with another DGI defector: Miguel Mir, a high official in Castro's personal security office from 1986 to 1992. Mir said he had read files identifying Cubela as a double agent under DGI control.

Mercurial and enigmatic, Cubela was one of the military heroes of the Cuban revolution, the man who actually captured the presidential palace in Havana. But soon afterward he began talking loosely about his dissatisfaction with Castro's political direction. By 1961 he was meeting clandestinely with the CIA; by 1962 he was a trusted recruit, regarded by the CIA as its best agent inside Castro's government.

But, Latell writes, Cubela's recruitment by the CIA practically dripped with question marks right from the beginning. He seemed to have unlimited time and money to travel, meeting with CIA officers on four different continents. He refused to take a lie-detector test — a standard procedure for new recruits — or report any significant information about what was going on inside Castro's government. Instead, he constantly proposed "violent action," as one of his CIA handlers noted in a report, including the assassination of Castro.

That did not exactly clash with the CIA's own plans. By early 1963, the agency was under serious pressure from the Kennedy administration to "come up with some ideas to kill Castro," as one CIA official would later testify in a congressional hearing. In October, the agency began circulating a document to the top national security officials in Washington stamped TOP SECRET-SENSITIVE with the title A Contingency Plan for a Coup in Cuba. It said Cubela and his military co-conspirators would "neutralize" Castro and "the top echelon of the Cuban leadership," then proclaim a new pro-American government that would — if necessary — ask for U.S. military assistance to put down any resistance. "Nothing in the plan allowed for Fidel's capture alive," Latell writes.

When Cubela heard of the plan and his role in it, he was enthusiastic. But he insisted on a meeting with Robert Kennedy, the president's brother and point-man on Cuba, for assurances that the plan had presidential blessing. Desmond FitzGerald, a top CIA official and close friend of Robert Kennedy, flew to Paris to meet Cubela and reassure him. The CIA also got President Kennedy to insert a chunk of extraordinarily militant rhetoric — a virtual endorsement of a military coup — into a speech on Cuba delivered in Miami Beach just four days before the president's death.

The CIA called off its plan for the Cuban coup after Kennedy's assassination, and new President Lyndon Johnson rapidly de-escalated the covert U.S. war against Castro — though Cubela, for another two years, continued pressing both the CIA and militant Cuban exile groups in Miami for help in killing Castro. Most of the CIA officials who oversaw Cubela's involvement with their agency insisted until they died that he had genuinely turned against Castro.

Cubela was arrested in Havana in 1966 and tried for plotting to murder Castro. But during his trial, prosecutors never mentioned the CIA or the poison-tipped pen, accusing him instead of collaborating with Miami exiles. He was convicted and sentenced to death — but the sentence was commuted to a prison term at Castro's request. He served 12 years as the prison's doctor, living in comfortable quarters, and was often seen outside, driving the streets. Nearly 80, Cubela reportedly divides his time between Spain and South Florida. Attempts by the Miami Herald to reach him through family members were unsuccessful.

<END QUOTE>

Best Regards in Research,

++Don

Donald Roberdeau

U.S.S. John F. Kennedy, CV-67, plank walker

Sooner, or later, The Truth emerges Clearly

For your considerations....

Homepage : President KENNEDY "Men of Courage" speech, and Assassination Evidence,

Witnesses, Suspects + Outstanding Researchers Discoveries and Considerations.... http://droberdeau.bl...ination_09.html

Dealey Plaza Map : Detailing 11-22-63 Victims precise locations, Witnesses, Films & Photos,

Evidence, Suspected bullet trajectories, Important information & Key Considerations, in One Convenient Resource.... http://img831.images...dated110110.gif

Visual Report : "The First Bullet Impact Into President Kennedy: while JFK was Still Hidden

Under the 'magic-limbed-ricochet-tree' ".... http://img504.images...k1102308ms8.gif

Visual Report : Reality versus C.A.D. : the Real World, versus, Garbage-In, Garbage-Out.... http://img248.images...ealityvscad.gif

Discovery : "Very Close JFK Assassination Witness ROSEMARY WILLIS Zapruder Film

Documented 2nd Headsnap:

West, Ultrafast, and Directly Towards the Grassy Knoll".... http://educationforu...?showtopic=2394

T ogether

E veryone

A chieves

M ore

For the United States:

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Edited by Don Roberdeau
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In my view it is more rubbish in time for the 50th anniversary. Especially the quote from Lee Oswald saying 'I'm going to kill Kennedy for this'. As he is departing the Cuban embassy.

Everyone now knows that Castro and Kennedy were in secret talks, even at the very moment of Kennedy's death. We also know that Castro was both surprised and very saddened at the news of the assassination.

I found this morning in reading V. Bugliousi's comments about this Castro story that I agreed with him! That was also a shock, but seriously, why would Castro do something so destructive that could very well have his country blown up.

And honestly, if this ex-CIA agent has documents that could change the course of history so much, wouldn't he be calling for a new investigation instead of writing a book?

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Sounds like another Gerald Posner game to sell books.

Knowing the Dallas Gang, one of them called Cuba to seed the information to Cuban Intelligence that JFK was going to be hit. So, they listened to see if their info dropper was real.

I think Chruschev and Castro were on the bandwagon for Peaceful Co-existance theme and were giving that all their support. The last thing either of them wanted was JFK to be killed.

JFK died mainly because he didn't play the anti-communist war games, or the Zionists need a bomb support. imho

JFK died from a rather massive plot from Dallas involving General Cabell, General Walker, HL Hunt and PERMINDEX. Backing the plotters was LBJ and JE Hoover. Recruited for the Cover-up were Allen Dulles, Earl Warren, Gerald Ford, et al.

LHO was running around dropping information all over the place trying to stop the JFK hit in Dallas, as he knew exactly who was doing the hit and it wasn't Castro's guys.

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The author, Brian Latell, made a point of saying he has no evidence that Castro order the assassination, just that he had advance knowledge.

“I don’t say Fidel Castro ordered the assassination, I don’t say Oswald was under his control. He might have been, but I don’t argue that, because I was unable to find any evidence for that,” he said.

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The author, Brian Latell, made a point of saying he has no evidence that Castro order the assassination, just that he had advance knowledge.

"I don't say Fidel Castro ordered the assassination, I don't say Oswald was under his control. He might have been, but I don't argue that, because I was unable to find any evidence for that," he said.

Fidel has stated on a number of oocasions that if Cuba had foreknowledge it would have been duty bound to inform US authorities (see Texas archive of Fidels speeches. (which interestingly was devoid of documents during the period of the assassination which makes the doc found by Robert even more interesting)). He is a lawyer and a revolutionary defending at that time a precarious sovereignty.

In contemporary context re the visit of the Pope and other matters the MSM are publishing slanted articles. This is a scaled up negative focus on Cuba. A part of the ongoing attempt to destabilise Cuba. Personally I think, just as the pentagon papers showed there is a great resistance to abandon flawed foreign policies, these actions will also rebound. Not that I think for a moment that the ongoing damage control will ever deviate from the principle of 'there is an opportunity in everything'.

edit typos

Edited by John Dolva
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Guest Robert Morrow

I suggest emailing the author Glenn Garvin of this article some of your best JFK research, good books to read and articles.

I sent him my essay on the JFK assassination and reached him today with a follow up phone call. He was open to new information.

Garvin also said that JFK assassination was not his regular beat and that this article was written because a local man, Brian Latell, had written a book.

GLENN GARVIN can be reached at GGARVIN@MIAMIHERALD.COM .

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Here is a theory I keep hearing on many JFK Assassination anniversary programs of late relating to Cuba. It could be all b.s dis-info, but can some of you let me know if you've heard of this :

+Cuban Missile Crisis did not fully get all the nukes out of Cuba. The monitors WERE NOT the United States, but rather the United Nations.

+Nukes were left in Cuba until the late 70s and finally taken out during the Carter Administration.

+Military/Joint Chiefs/ Congress knew about the remaining missiles and found it unacceptable to have those nukes left in Cuba.

+Kennedy fought with establishment about this, and establishment - Congress + Military, basically privately impeached him. This could not be done publicly as the nation would demand war on Cuba thus leading to war with the USSR. Country/World could not go thru another missile crisis.

+Decision made to 'impeach' JFK by other means i.e. Dallas

I dont know who the person is who promotes this theory, but he's always called on the C2C program on the 11/22 anniversary shows the last few years. You can probably get a copy of this show on youtube from the last 2 years.

Edited by Rodney Rivers
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Frankie, I'm definitely on the "rubbish" call with you.

Actually it is even possible that Cuban intelligence had picked up on some of the talk against JFK circulating in Miami among certain of the exile community. And it would certainly have been visible to Cuban agents that security (and some exile hostility) on JFK's Miami trip was excessive (you had the Secret Service going to its exile contacts for assistance in identifying potential trouble makers and threats there). And you have the apparently impulsive visit by Castro to a foreign embassy in Havana to warn that some of the people the CIA is working with against him could be dangerous even back in the US, essentially warning that they are loose cannons. (now the Castro did it folks posture that as a threat from Castro but that is pretty silly given that he is in active back channel dialog with JFK at that point in time).

Castro may have had nothing but rumor and gossip that JFK was at risk (if so clearly he would not have been the only one). And he might well have taken some small measures to look for more - think of the propaganda impact of his exposing exile plotting against the US President.

I'm not sure the radio intercept part of this makes total sense to me but it makes no sense for Castro to be looking for traces of project he himself has to take out JFK. Not that the media would not play that old record once again - since it dates back to Nov. 23, 1963.

..................

In my view it is more rubbish in time for the 50th anniversary. Especially the quote from Lee Oswald saying 'I'm going to kill Kennedy for this'. As he is departing the Cuban embassy.

Everyone now knows that Castro and Kennedy were in secret talks, even at the very moment of Kennedy's death. We also know that Castro was both surprised and very saddened at the news of the assassination.

I found this morning in reading V. Bugliousi's comments about this Castro story that I agreed with him! That was also a shock, but seriously, why would Castro do something so destructive that could very well have his country blown up.

And honestly, if this ex-CIA agent has documents that could change the course of history so much, wouldn't he be calling for a new investigation instead of writing a book?

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'The wiretaps also demonstrate something about the way Cuban intelligence officers regarded Kennedy. "Wonderful! What good news!" Calderon said to another caller who mentioned the assassination, before breaking into laughter at the news — untrue, as it would turn out — that Kennedy's wife and brother had also been wounded. "He was a family man, yes, but also a degenerate aggressor," Calderon added, to which her caller exclaimed, "Three shots in the face!" Replied Calderon: "Perfect!" '

(Underlined quotation:) Interesting admission or supposition, if indeed it occurred.

Three from the front from Oswaldskovich up in the TSBD?

Sourced from a rumor of three shots to the head, from whatever direction?

Edited by David Andrews
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