Jump to content
The Education Forum

Was Jimmy Carter cut off of TV when he spoke of JFK assassination in March, 1977?


Guest Robert Morrow
 Share

Recommended Posts

Guest Robert Morrow

Is there anyone at Education Forum who remembers this or can document this?:

"(Remember how President Carter was cut off the air when he began to speak about the assassination of JFK in March 1977?)"

Web link: http://www.amazon.com/review/RWY5PRSGIQ00D/ref=cm_cr_dp_title?ie=UTF8&ASIN=1855016109&channel=detail-glance&nodeID=283155&store=books

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Robert,

I think someone has confused an earlier incident here. Carter was actually cut off when the subject of the CIA came up, in a debate with Gerald Ford during the 1976 campaign. I don't recall Carter ever bringing up the JFK assassination (and I was keenly watching for this at that time), even though his sister Ruth Carter Stapleton was publicly vocal about the issue.

If I recall correctly, he wasn't cut off by a questioner, but the audio (perhaps video, too- can't remember) suddenly failed at the moment the CIA was mentioned. It was certainly fittingly paranoid.

I'd love to be wrong, but I'd have to see an actual film clip to believe it.

Edited by Don Jeffries
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Robert,

I think someone has confused an earlier incident here. Carter was actually cut off when the subject of the CIA came up, in a debate with Gerald Ford during the 1976 campaign. I don't recall Carter ever bringing up the JFK assassination (and I was keenly watching for this at that time), even though his sister Ruth Carter Stapleton was publicly vocal about the issue.

If I recall correctly, he wasn't cut off by a questioner, but the audio (perhaps video, too- can't remember) suddenly failed at the moment the CIA was mentioned. It was certainly fittingly paranoid.

I'd love to be wrong, but I'd have to see an actual film clip to believe it.

A portion of the transcript from that September 23, 1976 debate:

Ms. DREW. Mr. President, the real problem with the FBI--in fact, all of the intelligence agencies--is there are no real laws governing them. Such laws as there are tend to be vague and open-ended. Now, you have issued some Executive orders, but we have learned that leaving these agencies to executive discretion and direction can get them and in fact the country in a great deal of trouble. One President may be a decent man, the next one might not be. So, what do you think about trying to write in some more protection by getting some laws governing these agencies?

THE PRESIDENT. You are familiar, of course, with the fact that I am the first President in 30 years who has reorganized the intelligence agencies in the Federal Government--the CIA, the Defense Intelligence Agency, the National Security Agency, and the others. We've done that by Executive order. And I think we've tightened it up; we've straightened out their problems that developed over the last few years. It doesn't seem to me that it's needed or necessary to have legislation in this particular regard. I have recommended to the Congress, however--I'm sure you are familiar with this--legislation that would make it very proper and in the right way that the Attorney General could go in and get the right for wiretapping under security cases. This was an effort that was made by the Attorney General and myself working with the Congress. But even in this area where I think new legislation would be justified, the Congress has not responded. So, I feel in that case as well as in the reorganization of the intelligence agencies--as I've done--we have to do it by Executive order. And I'm glad that we have a good Director in George Bush; we have good Executive orders. And the CIA and the DIA and NSA are now doing a good job under proper supervision.

THE MODERATOR. Governor Carter.

MR. CARTER. Well, one of the very serious things that's happened in our Government in recent years and has continued up until now is a breakdown in the trust among our people in the . . .

[At this point, there was an audio failure which caused a delay in the debate until 11:18 p.m.]

THE MODERATOR. Ladies and gentlemen, probably it is not necessary for me to say that we had a technical failure during the debates. It was not a failure in the debate; it was a failure in the broadcasting of the debate. It occurred 27 minutes ago. The fault has been dealt with, and we want to thank President Ford and Governor Carter for being so patient and understanding while this delay went on. We very much regret the technical failure that lost the sound as it was leaving the theatre. It occurred during Governor Carter's response to what would have been and what was the last question put to the candidates. That question went to President Ford. It dealt with the control of Government intelligence agencies. Governor Carter was making his response and had very nearly finished it. He will conclude that response now, after which President Ford and Governor Carter will make their closing statements.

MR. CARTER. There has been too much Government secrecy and not enough respect for the personal privacy of American citizens.

THE MODERATOR. It is now time for the closing statements which are to be up to 4 minutes long. Governor Carter, by the same toss of the coin that directed the first question to you, you are to go first now.....

http://www.fordlibra...ches/760947.asp

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Please sign in to comment

You will be able to leave a comment after signing in



Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...