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The "OSWALD $13 GIFT"


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In previous postings on other threads, I have attempted to show the possibility that the label on the "Undeliverable Package" is a series of puzzles. Not knowing much about coded messages and puzzles, I've gone down many blind alleys and argued for things I no longer believe. But I'm still at it, and my goal remains: To show that it is a puzzle, so that real puzzle solvers will take on the task of solving it. If it turns out I'm wrong, well, I've wasted a lot of time, and I hope you'll forgive me for wasting yours. If on the other hand any of this turns out to be correct, the puzzle answers might not stand up in a court of law, but we might have learned something.

http://educationforum.ipbhost.com/index.php?showtopic=20276

My theory is more fully explained in the "Oswald Code" thread linked above, but the basic idea is this: Lee Oswald and Igor Vaganov followed through with a plan to prevent the assassination. The prevention plan probably originated with Richard Case Nagell and was called "N". It was directed against the assassination ground operation, "E", being planned and orchestrated by W Guy Banister and David W Ferrie.

The idea of "N", was to disseminate a large number of decodable 13-letter puzzles that would tell the Oswald/Nagell/Vaganov story of "E", the planned assassination ground operation. The flagship of "N" was what has become known as the "Undeliverable Package", and copies of this were to be sent to selected individuals and organizations around the world. The numerous decodable 13-letter puzzles embedded on the label of the "Undeliverable Package" both provided assassination information, and served as a teaching guide to the decoding of other puzzles created by the "N" team. If the "N" plan succeeded, the puzzles would be meaningless; if the "N" plan failed, at least the Oswald/Nagell/Vaganov story would be discoverable or so they apparently thought.

As my theory goes, in addition to the 13-letter puzzles on the label of the Undeliverable Package, there are 13-letter "verbal statement" puzzles, 13-letter "activity statement" puzzles, and 13-letter puzzles written down on paper in various places. I also believe Ive identified a few puzzles that dont fall into the 13-letter category.

Decoding the puzzles requires the use of a unique (and seemingly absurd) application of 6-bit binary code. The puzzles also require the solver to make anagrams, which is a little disappointing, in that the use of anagrams seriously lowers the objectivity index. But if it turns out my theory is correct, this is what we've been given, and even though the information might not stand up in a court of law, we could possibly learn something.

Since I think I now have better information about the Undeliverable Package and the myriad of puzzles contained on its label, I am transferring what I think Ive learned that has stood the test of time to a new thread, The Oswald Code, and removing more primitive and sometimes bogus beliefs from my postings on this thread.

Tom

Edited by Tom Hume
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http://i1278.photobucket.com/albums/y520/TomHume440/nassaus_zpsd4b8f0a7.jpg

Since the label contains both letters and numbers, a method is needed to decode numbers to letters and visa versa. The simplest method known is one many of us learned as kids, and while it might not be appropriate for James Bond, if one wanted a stranger to decode your message without a key, this would be the ideal method:

(A=0) (B=1) (C=2) (D=3) (E=4) (F=5) (G=6) (H=7) (I=8) (J=9) (K=10) (L=11) (M=12) (N=13) (O=14) (P=15) (Q=16) (R=17) (S=18) (T=19) (U=20) (V=21) (W=22) (X=23) (Y=24) (Z=25)

This simple method works on the label and it appears we have been given instructions to use it. The first "a" on the label, the one in Oswald, has a spike sticking out of the top of it. The only "0" (zero) on the label, in "601", has an identical spike sticking out of the top of it as well; "A" being equivalent to "0" (zero), as in the above decoding formula.

Therefore, "601" can decode to "GAB".

"GAB" is an anagram for "BAG", and we know that a bag is what the "Oswald $13 Gift" was supposed to have contained. GAB are also the initials of George A. Bouhe, and the postage due notice found in Oswald's suitcase at the Paines house was associated in the first Dallas Police inventory with another post office form bearing the name, George A. Bouhe. GAB is also an anagram for Guy Banisters business, "GBA", Guy Banister Associates.

So we can entertain the possibility that decoding the address label will involve some anagrams.

OSWALD'S O:

Next we'll turn our attention to the strange looking "O" in "Oswald". For me, this was the first solid clue that the label might be a coded message.

http://i1278.photobucket.com/albums/y520/TomHume440/OwithoandM_zpsad4056c1.jpg

The "O" in "Oswald" was formed as he usually wrote it with a couple of exceptions: The line for the large round swoop at the top heads off horizontally to the right as usual, but the portion inside of the O is over-drawn much heavier, creating a robust "C" in the top area of the "O". Also, there is a smaller "o" shaped structure inside the "C" shaped structure.

On closer examination, the small "o" structure also looks like an "L" and a "7".

http://i1278.photobucket.com/albums/y520/TomHume440/OwithL7andi_zps35f305b4.jpg

So is it an "o" or an "L7" inside the "C" inside the big "O"?

It's both. And "7" decodes to an "H", so what we have inside the "C" is an all-in-one symbol created by Oswald that says "LHO".

To me, it's always seemed like the big "C" and "O" structure was devouring the little "LHO" symbol; the "CO" (The Company), devouring the little "LHO" (Lee Harvey Oswald).

Theres more going on here that I'll get back to later.

JFKs PT-109 and Mu:

Oswald's expression "6;01" on the label has many functions and some of them require noticing what appears to be a prominent semi-colon perched up high between the six and the zero. While youre looking at it, notice the next letter, the "W" in "West", which has a large lower-case "n" attached to its left wing.

http://i1278.photobucket.com/albums/y520/TomHume440/601West_zpse660375f.jpg

When the "6;01" is turned upside down, the number becomes "109", as in John Kennedys destroyed WWII craft, the PT-109.

http://i1278.photobucket.com/albums/y520/TomHume440/MU109_zps4ea3b499.jpg

With the semicolon, "109" also gets divided into two numbers, "10" and "9", and "10" decodes to "K", and "9" decodes to "J", or the anagram, "JK".

Also, there appears to be large nicely formed, albeit lightly shaded and pixel-poor, capital "F" inside the "O", making the full expression "JFK".

http://i1278.photobucket.com/albums/y520/TomHume440/ThequotFquotintheZero_zpsc4f660fd.jpg

Now notice that the upside-down "W" with the "n" attached becomes "Mu".

http://i1278.photobucket.com/albums/y520/TomHume440/MU109_zps4ea3b499.jpg

The Japanese, Chinese, and Korean translations for "mu" are things like, does not exist, not, not having, and gone. The implication here seems to be that like the PT-109, JFK does not, or shortly will not, be.

And when that will happen, "Mu JFK", is revealed when we use the above key to decode "Mu" to numbers: "M" to "12", and "u" to "20".

Mu 12:20 JFK.

As it turned out, his prediction was off by a few minutes, but this time, 12:20, will take on even more meaning in a future post.

TWO PERFECT ADDRESS LINE ANAGRAMS:

http://i1278.photobucket.com/albums/y520/TomHume440/WGBanister_zps96cb77f0.jpg

Like the "O" in "Oswald", there are several other letters on the label that have other letters obviously imbedded in them. One of them is the "W" in "West" which contains a large lowercase "n" on the left wing of the "W", a lower case "r" over the top of that, and a lowercase dotted "i" in the middle of the "W". The letters of the two first expressions on the address line of the label are, "G A B W e s t" and with the extra imbedded letters, we have, "G A B W e s t i n r", and this is the perfect anagram for "W G Banister".

http://i1278.photobucket.com/albums/y520/TomHume440/Assassinate_zps3174d91c.jpg

The second two expressions on the address line are "Nassaus St", and as John Dolva pointed out a couple of years ago, these letters almost make the anagram for "Assassinate". A second look will reveal that the apparent spelling for "Nassaus" could just as easily be viewed as "Nassaies". The "i" is even dotted (this spelling will be confirmed in a future post). Also, there appears to be a capital "A" drawn horizontally across the "t" in "St". With these two considerations, we have "N a s s a i e s S t A", the perfect anagram for "Assassinate".

Most everything in this post I've covered before. My next post will contain more new material.

Tom

Edited by Tom Hume
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http://i1278.photobucket.com/albums/y520/TomHume440/nassaus_zpsd4b8f0a7.jpg

There are thirteen primary letters on the label; they are the first letter of each word, plus the three numbers, "601". Here is the list: "F L O G A B W N S D T I T". Using the simplest method for chaning letters to numbers and visa versa, the "601" became "GAB" in our list.

I believe that we, the puzzle solvers, are supposed to make 13-letter anagrams using all of these letters, anagrams that are meanigful, and if these anagrams were intended by the puzzles creator, we will be able to decode our anagram using 6-bit binary code.

Here are a few examples:

The first three are exactly the same, but each has a different meaning.

OSWALD NBT GIFT. (NBT = Nothing But the Truth).

OSWALD NBT GIFT. (NBT = Nitro Blue Tetrazolium)

Chemistry is over my head, but Nitro Blue Tetrazolium is a compound thats been around a long time. Its primarily used for diagnostic purposes in medicine. Under certain conditions it will turn dark blue, and under other conditions it becomes fluorescent it glows. There are articles on the Internet that talk about its use for making secret messages, but someone with a background in chemistry will have to sort this one out. It might become relevant when and if we the people get to study the OSWALD NBT GIFT in the National Archives.

"OSWALD NBT GIFT" = OSWALD 13 BT GIFT. BT" is the abreviation for a binary code "Bit", and the letter "N" decodes to "13".

"TWO BANDITS - GF. L"

"BANDITS GOLF TW" Looking at the "W" in "Oswald, there is a "T" formed on its left wing. The "T" in this case might stand for a golf "tee", and a 13-letter puzzle that starts at that point, and ends at what appears to be a golf flag between the "N" in Nassaus", and the next letter "a".

Were going to look on the label at the word West.

http://i1278.photobucket.com/albums/y520/TomHume440/nassaus_zpsd4b8f0a7.jpg

Theres a large lower-case n attached to the left wing of the W, a lowercase r over the top of that, a dotted i in the middle of the W and the i is dotted with a tiny little e.

http://i1278.photobucket.com/albums/y520/TomHume440/quotequotinquotWquot_zps073c0e9f.jpg

West is the direction of 270 degrees, and these numbers decode to CHA.

In the word West, then, Oswald provided us with:

Winerchaest. And when we anagram this, we have:

A Winchester.

Then when we apply the 270, we have:

A .270 Winchester

And all this is crammed into one word, West, on the label!

There seem to be faces scattered all around this pixel-poor JPEG of a label, and they may have an important function in solving Oswalds puzzle.

Check this out:

http://i1278.photobucket.com/albums/y520/TomHume440/Shaw3_zpsf2423301.jpg

http://i1278.photobucket.com/albums/y520/TomHume440/nassaus_zpsd4b8f0a7.jpg

Following some basic puzzle-type rules, the name Clay Shaw can be made from the first four letters of Oswalds name on the label (remember that theres an L and an H inside the large C shaped formation in the O). If youre wondering where the Y is, its black, and it appears to be hanging out of the mouth of this touched-up version of Clay Shaw. This photograph, or drawing, or whatever it is, is right between the a and the l in Oswald. Were looking at a JPEG of a photo of package label containing a mans picture that cant be much more than a quarter of an inch square.

Tom

Edited by Tom Hume
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I like puzzles, Tom. Drawing on an other post, Oswald gave 3601 North Beckley (which doesn't exist) as address for his PO box while he was living at 1026 (which does exist) and here is another PO related item with the numbers 601 1 (before the West Nassaua (which doesn't exist) is a line, l or 1.. ) ie, the numbers 0,1 and 6 with 1,2 and 3 as extras. (Don't get me started on North West. :) ) ?

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http://i1278.photobucket.com/albums/y520/TomHume440/nassaus_zpsd4b8f0a7.jpg

(A=0) (B=1) (C=2) (D=3) (E=4) (F=5) (G=6) (H=7) (I=8) (J=9) (K=10) (L=11) (M=12) (N=13) (O=14) (P=15) (Q=16) (R=17) (S=18) (T=19) (U=20) (V=21) (W=22) (X=23) (Y=24) (Z=25)

My favorite fiction writer is Kurt Vonnegut, and he once said something like, “Screw suspense and tell the reader from the beginning how the story will end. They could rewrite the final pages in case they were eaten by cockroaches.”

As I was starting to work on this post last night, I made an amazing discovery, an important piece of evidence on the label that I’d overlooked. And I really want to tell you about it, but I can’t just yet. We have to learn how the elegant puzzle works so we can appreciate the correctness of our often surprising and informative solutions.

Once again, I know that it’s not a done deal that Lee Oswald gave us this “Gift” package, but since I’m not a scholar, I hope I’m forgiven for talking about this puzzle as if it was his creation.

And if he did make it, he’s telling us some of the important stuff he knew -right now - for the very first time.

As Vonnegut might say at this point, “Listen”.

Today we’re going to look at some anagrams he made for us, mostly using the THIRTEEN primary letters on the label – it will be informative and hopefully fun. Three of these primary letters are what I’m going to call “wildcard” letters.

The thirteen include the first letter of each word on the label and the three numbers. For ease, we’re going to change those three numbers to letters – “601” decodes to “GAB” (and we can always change them back if need be).

“F L O G A B W N S D T I T”

Three of these letters have a different status: The “pre-printed” letter “F” in the word “For” is not hand-written and is one of the “wild-card” letters due to its uniqueness. “Dallas” is crossed out, but Oswald left the “D” ambiguous, surviving the lining-through process. The “t” in “Irving texas” is unique because it’s not capitalized.

So here’s Oswald’s list of primary letters:

“L O G A B W N S T I”, with wildcards “F D T”

In our anagrams, we’re required to use all of the first ten letters - the wildcard letters can be used if needed.

If we’ve discovered an intended anagram, it will be validated in some convincing way on the label itself, often surprisingly so.

For starters, since we know the date of the assassination, we can see if it’s in this group of letters:

“L” decodes to “11”, “W” decodes to “22”, “T” decodes to “19”, “G” decodes to “6”, and “D” decodes to “3”.

“11-22-1963”

And leftover, we have “F O A B N S I” and wildcard “T”. And the pretty obvious anagram is:

“BASTION” (the wildcard “T” is left unused)

A “Bastion” is a relatively protected place, high in a building structure, where you shoot at people from. I can’t find another single word in the English language that contains those seven letters. So the completed anagram is:

“11-22-1963; BASTION”

To validate this as an intended anagram, we have to understand the rules for navigating the labyrinth of the label. It’s not unlike a game of chess. And once you get into the game, it will become clear what the rules must be; Oswald made it so.

I’m going to tell you what I think the rules are at an appendix at the bottom. (This could be tedious for some, and I don’t want to loose you right now). So for now, if you would, trust me that these anagrams appear bonafide, often breathtakingly so.

Next anagram, and the thirteen letters again are: “L O G A B W N S T I”, with wildcards “F D T”

“LOST TWIN BAG” (12 of the primary letters with leftover wildcard, “F”)

“LO’s TWIN BAG” (11 of the primary letters with leftover wildcards, “TF”)

“LO TSD TWIN BAG” (12 of the primary letters with leftover wildcard “F”)

Even though “Texas School Book Depository” was written on the front of 411 Elm, some people regard “schoolbook” as one word. In his address book, Oswald listed the “TSBD” as “Texas School Depository”.

Using what I understand to be Oswald’s rules, all three of these anagrams are validated on the label, and it’s my assumption that Oswald not only could predict that we’d discover these three closely related anagrams, but that if he didn’t intend one of them, he would have sabotaged it’s validation on the label in some way.

Next anagram using, “L O G A B W N S T I”, with wildcards “F D T”:

“BANDITS GLOW” (11 Letters with leftover “F T”)

I’ve long believed that the label, and maybe even the package and bag inside, were treated in certain areas with glow-in-the-dark inks so as to reveal the names of the conspirators, etc. (and we may have been given the formula, which I’ll get to in a second).

Next anagrams using “L O G A B W N S T I”, with wildcards “F D T”:

This anagram has four very similar but distinct solutions, and I believe it’s Oswald’s primary13 letter anagram.

“OSWALD NBT GIFT”. (“NBT” = “Nothing But the Truth”, and uses all thirteen primary letters.

Next:

“OSWALD NBT GIFT”. (“NBT” = “Nitro Blue Tetrazolium”)

Chemistry is over my head, but “Nitro Blue Tetrazolium” is a compound that’s been around a long time. It’s primarily used for diagnostic purposes in medicine. Under certain conditions it will turn dark blue, and under other conditions it becomes fluorescent – it glows. There are articles on the Internet that talk about its use for making secret messages, but someone with a background in chemistry will have to sort this one out. It might become relevant when and if “we the people” get to study the “OSWALD NBT GIFT” in the National Archives.

Next related anagram (“N” decodes to “13”):

“OSWALD 13 Bt. GIFT” (“Bt.” = “Bit”, and uses all thirteen primary letters.

This is the anagram that I only discovered last night. The meaning of the 13 bits, and the conformation on the label will have to wait until we start discussing Oswald’s “binary code” messages, but the “13 Bit Gift” he gave is kind of a mind blower and its validation on the label is downright elegant).

“OSWALD 13 B Gift” (uses 12 primary letters with a “T” left over).

“B” here turns out to mean “Bucks” (Oswald 13 Buck Gift), and we won’t know that for sure until we go to the label for guidance:

http://i1278.photobucket.com/albums/y520/TomHume440/nassaus_zpsd4b8f0a7.jpg

“B” decodes to the number “1” and we find that in the “601” expression on the label. It’s the only number or letter that connects across a line, connecting as it does with the big “D”. There is a “C” shaped flourish on the “D”, and one meaning of “C” is “100”. The “C” connects both to the “1” above, and the left side of the “D”, forming a “cent” sign.

So, there is a “1’, “D” decodes to “3”, there is a “C” which means 100, and a “cent” sign.

“1300 cents”, or “$13.00”. And following Oswald’s strict board-game rules, we can make the full expression on the label: “Oswald $13 Gift”.

And, of course, when Oswald was arrested, he had $13 in his wallet, obviously I gather, because he feared he’d soon be dead. And he wanted to validate this very package-label puzzle as being his secret before-the-fact “gift”, hopefully to not remain a secret.

One last anagram for today that uses 12 primary letters with “F” left over:

“Win. 6.5 Sabot Ld.”, or spelled out fully, “Winchester 6.5mm Sabot Load.”

To me, because of the two abbreviated words, it’s not the most impressive “bona fide” anagram I’ve seen. But it’s interesting because of the information it reveals, and impressive by how it is mirrored on the label itself.

For those unfamiliar with a Sabot, as was I, it’s a coated slug that can be fired from a larger caliber rifle. If one wanted to preserve the ballistic markings on a particular slug fired through a particular rifle, like say a 6.5mm Carcano, one could reload that slug into a larger bore gun like, say a .270 Winchester, shoot somebody, and it would be theoretically provable that the shot came from the Carcano.

So this piece of information came from the primary letters on the label, and now let’s see if we can validate our anagram, “Win 6.5 Sabot Ld”, on the label itself. This is a must if we are to know, with some degree of certainty, that this is what he intended to tell us.

We’re going to look on the label at the word “West”.

http://i1278.photobucket.com/albums/y520/TomHume440/nassaus_zpsd4b8f0a7.jpg

There’s a large lower-case “n” attached to the left wing of the “W”, a lowercase “r” over the top of that, a dotted “i” in the middle of the “W” and the “i” is dotted with a tiny little “e”.

http://i1278.photobucket.com/albums/y520/TomHume440/quotequotinquotWquot_zps073c0e9f.jpg

West is the direction of “270” degrees, and these numbers decode to “CHA”.

In the word “West”, then, Oswald provided us with:

“Winerchaest”. And when we anagram this, we have:

“A Winchester”.

Then when we apply the “270”, we have:

“A .270 Winchester”

And all this is crammed into one word, “West”, on the label!

But we’re not done. Following Oswald’s very strict rules for making anagrams on the label itself (rules we can tease out - rules I touch on below), we can make (or find), “A .270 Winchester Sabot Load”.

I’ll do it quickly because it might be interesting to some, but if you find this aspect to tedious, skip the next five paragraphs.

The letter to the left of “West” is a “B” (decoded from “1”). The next letter is “A” (decoded from “0”). We learned in my last post that inside that “O” is an upside down “F” which decodes to a “5”. The next letter is “6”.

We’re trying to make “A .270 Winchester 6.5 Sabot Load”, and so far we’ve got “A .270 Winchester 6.5 ab.

Now we go to the “t” in “West” (and since we’ve already used “West”, we can travel across it). At the top of the “t” in “West”, there’s a vertical line, a connection, one of a very few for crossing from line to line; there’s a little arrow pointing to this connection and it leads us to a little “t” on top of the left wing of the “w” in “Oswald”.

At this busy crossroads point, the top of the little “t”, we can go right, left, down, or, we can follow the dotted line that ascends from the left of the little “t”, to meet the end of the tail-swoop of the letter “O”, which is right on top of the “s”. Following Oswald’s rules, we can finish our complete expression:

“A .270 Winchester 6.5 Sabot Load”.

So we have two things; a robust and pertinent anagram (only one of several) made from the thirteen primary letters on the label), that gives us, “Win. 6.5 Sabot Ld.”. And when we look to the larger label, we can use Oswald’s rules to navigate the label’s labyrinth, and find: “A .270 Winchester 6.5 Sabot Load”.

Easy if we’ve discovered an intended anagram, nearly impossible if not.

There are faces scattered all around this pixel-poor JPEG of a label, and they have an important function in solving Oswald’s puzzle.

Check this out:

http://i1278.photobucket.com/albums/y520/TomHume440/Shaw3_zpsf2423301.jpg

http://i1278.photobucket.com/albums/y520/TomHume440/nassaus_zpsd4b8f0a7.jpg

Following some basic puzzle-type rules that Oswald laid down for us, rules that we can intuit by working with the puzzle, the name Clay Shaw can be made from the first four letters of “Oswald’s” name on the label (remember that there’s an “L” and an “H” inside the large “C” shaped formation in the “O”). If you’re wondering where the “Y” is, it’s black, and it appears to be hanging out of the mouth of this touched-up version of Clay Shaw. This photograph, or drawing, or whatever it is, is right between the “a” and the “l” in “Oswald”. We’re looking at a JPEG of a photo of package label containing a man’s picture that can’t be much more than a quarter of an inch square.

Next time I’ll tell you about the “OSWALD 13 BIT GIFT”. I think you’ll like it.

Tom

Some basic instructions navigating the game board – the label. This is a work in progress:

Start wherever you like on a walking trip through the label. For the most part, you need to stay on the line you’re on, moving from one letter to the next, picking up its value to your anagram, and putting in your pocket. You can go backwards or forwards, but not up or down unless you find a bridge. Using the simple code I gave you, letters can be changed into numbers and visa versa when the need arises. Some letters have other letters embedded in them, and some appear as another letter when turned upside down or sidewise. Also, letters and numbers can be used for other things they closely resemble; “zeros” can be used as “Os”, etc. Take whatever you need from the letter, and move on. If a letter has a face associated with it, be it a person, an animal, a cartoon face, or whatever, you’re entitled to skip that letter if you want. If you’re on one of the thirteen “primary letters”, you can jump to a neighboring “primary letter” on the same line. When you get to the end of a line, you can start at the next line as if you’re reading or typing, but you can move backwards or forwards. This is the only way to cross a line unless you find a bridge.

There’s a connection line, a bridge, between the “t” in “West”, and the “t” type structure on the left wing of the “w” in “Oswald” – this bridge has a little arrow pointing to it. This is a major crossroads, and from there you can move across the line to the “t” below, turn right to the “a” (which has man’s face inside), turn left to the “s”, or follow the dotted line up and to the left which leads you to the end of the “Os” tail-swoop near the top of the “s”, which this shortcut allows you to skip. When you’re at the little “t” crossroads, you can either use the “t/w”, or skip them both.

There’s also a cross-line connection at the “1” in “601” and the “D” in “Dallas”.

There may be other connections as well that are difficult to see do to the degraded quality of the label photo. My theory is this: The label photograph and the label portion of the package photograph are very different. The package photo looks pristine and was probably taken under bright lights. The label photo, as pixel-poor as it is, shows great detail that might be a result of the lighting that allowed the label’s glow-in-the-dark properties to be revealed.

Tom,

It's all rather complicated, isn't it.

Do you think Oswald expected the coded message to be noticed and solved right away?

And to think that the Internet hadn't even been invented yet!

Hey! Maybe that's why he was trying to reach John Hurt! You know, so he could decode it.

Look on the bright side, Tom. Even though you've been working on it for quite a while now at least you did have a major revelation about it just last eventing!

(Somehow this all reminds me of Bevilaqua's decoding of the text of The Manchurian Candidate...)

Sincerely,

--Tommy :sun

Edited by Thomas Graves
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I don't know, Tom. What you have written is very interesting. Thought I'd share this with you. I came up with this years ago.

It's, IMO, just a coincidence, but here goes:

On Oswald's Selective Service Card is the name:

Alek James Hidell

This is a simple anagram. Rearranging the letters, look what "falls out"

JK
Dallas
H.E.
Lee
MI

Looking for the meaning of H.E., I had only to look in a book of abbreviations. H.E. means Hoc Est or "this is" (recall the Mass was still in Latin in the early '60s)

So it comes out as:

JK
Dallas
H(oc) E(st) Lee
M(ilitary) I(ntelligence)

I don't put much faith in it, as we could probably do this with alot of things. But it was fun, and like yours, interesting.

Kathy

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http://i1278.photobucket.com/albums/y520/TomHume440/nassaus_zpsd4b8f0a7.jpg

(A=0) (B=1) (C=2) (D=3) (E=4) (F=5) (G=6) (H=7) (I=8) (J=9) (K=10) (L=11) (M=12) (N=13) (O=14) (P=15) (Q=16) (R=17) (S=18) (T=19) (U=20) (V=21) (W=22) (X=23) (Y=24) (Z=25)

My favorite fiction writer is Kurt Vonnegut, and he once said something like, “Screw suspense and tell the reader from the beginning how the story will end. They could rewrite the final pages in case they were eaten by cockroaches.”

As I was starting to work on this post last night, I made an amazing discovery, an important piece of evidence on the label that I’d overlooked. And I really want to tell you about it, but I can’t just yet. We have to learn how the elegant puzzle works so we can appreciate the correctness of our often surprising and informative solutions.

Once again, I know that it’s not a done deal that Lee Oswald gave us this “Gift” package, but since I’m not a scholar, I hope I’m forgiven for talking about this puzzle as if it was his creation.

And if he did make it, he’s telling us some of the important stuff he knew -right now - for the very first time.

As Vonnegut might say at this point, “Listen”.

Today we’re going to look at some anagrams he made for us, mostly using the THIRTEEN primary letters on the label – it will be informative and hopefully fun. Three of these primary letters are what I’m going to call “wildcard” letters.

The thirteen include the first letter of each word on the label and the three numbers. For ease, we’re going to change those three numbers to letters – “601” decodes to “GAB” (and we can always change them back if need be).

“F L O G A B W N S D T I T”

Three of these letters have a different status: The “pre-printed” letter “F” in the word “For” is not hand-written and is one of the “wild-card” letters due to its uniqueness. “Dallas” is crossed out, but Oswald left the “D” ambiguous, surviving the lining-through process. The “t” in “Irving texas” is unique because it’s not capitalized.

So here’s Oswald’s list of primary letters:

“L O G A B W N S T I”, with wildcards “F D T”

In our anagrams, we’re required to use all of the first ten letters - the wildcard letters can be used if needed.

If we’ve discovered an intended anagram, it will be validated in some convincing way on the label itself, often surprisingly so.

For starters, since we know the date of the assassination, we can see if it’s in this group of letters:

“L” decodes to “11”, “W” decodes to “22”, “T” decodes to “19”, “G” decodes to “6”, and “D” decodes to “3”.

“11-22-1963”

And leftover, we have “F O A B N S I” and wildcard “T”. And the pretty obvious anagram is:

“BASTION” (the wildcard “T” is left unused)

A “Bastion” is a relatively protected place, high in a building structure, where you shoot at people from. I can’t find another single word in the English language that contains those seven letters. So the completed anagram is:

“11-22-1963; BASTION”

To validate this as an intended anagram, we have to understand the rules for navigating the labyrinth of the label. It’s not unlike a game of chess. And once you get into the game, it will become clear what the rules must be; Oswald made it so.

I’m going to tell you what I think the rules are at an appendix at the bottom. (This could be tedious for some, and I don’t want to loose you right now). So for now, if you would, trust me that these anagrams appear bonafide, often breathtakingly so.

Next anagram, and the thirteen letters again are: “L O G A B W N S T I”, with wildcards “F D T”

“LOST TWIN BAG” (12 of the primary letters with leftover wildcard, “F”)

“LO’s TWIN BAG” (11 of the primary letters with leftover wildcards, “TF”)

“LO TSD TWIN BAG” (12 of the primary letters with leftover wildcard “F”)

Even though “Texas School Book Depository” was written on the front of 411 Elm, some people regard “schoolbook” as one word. In his address book, Oswald listed the “TSBD” as “Texas School Depository”.

Using what I understand to be Oswald’s rules, all three of these anagrams are validated on the label, and it’s my assumption that Oswald not only could predict that we’d discover these three closely related anagrams, but that if he didn’t intend one of them, he would have sabotaged it’s validation on the label in some way.

Next anagram using, “L O G A B W N S T I”, with wildcards “F D T”:

“BANDITS GLOW” (11 Letters with leftover “F T”)

I’ve long believed that the label, and maybe even the package and bag inside, were treated in certain areas with glow-in-the-dark inks so as to reveal the names of the conspirators, etc. (and we may have been given the formula, which I’ll get to in a second).

Next anagrams using “L O G A B W N S T I”, with wildcards “F D T”:

This anagram has four very similar but distinct solutions, and I believe it’s Oswald’s primary13 letter anagram.

“OSWALD NBT GIFT”. (“NBT” = “Nothing But the Truth”, and uses all thirteen primary letters.

Next:

“OSWALD NBT GIFT”. (“NBT” = “Nitro Blue Tetrazolium”)

Chemistry is over my head, but “Nitro Blue Tetrazolium” is a compound that’s been around a long time. It’s primarily used for diagnostic purposes in medicine. Under certain conditions it will turn dark blue, and under other conditions it becomes fluorescent – it glows. There are articles on the Internet that talk about its use for making secret messages, but someone with a background in chemistry will have to sort this one out. It might become relevant when and if “we the people” get to study the “OSWALD NBT GIFT” in the National Archives.

Next related anagram (“N” decodes to “13”):

“OSWALD 13 Bt. GIFT” (“Bt.” = “Bit”, and uses all thirteen primary letters.

This is the anagram that I only discovered last night. The meaning of the 13 bits, and the conformation on the label will have to wait until we start discussing Oswald’s “binary code” messages, but the “13 Bit Gift” he gave is kind of a mind blower and its validation on the label is downright elegant).

“OSWALD 13 B Gift” (uses 12 primary letters with a “T” left over).

“B” here turns out to mean “Bucks” (Oswald 13 Buck Gift), and we won’t know that for sure until we go to the label for guidance:http://i1278.photobucket.com/albums/y520/TomHume440/nassaus_zpsd4b8f0a7.jpg

“B” decodes to the number “1” and we find that in the “601” expression on the label. It’s the only number or letter that connects across a line, connecting as it does with the big “D”. There is a “C” shaped flourish on the “D”, and one meaning of “C” is “100”. The “C” connects both to the “1” above, and the left side of the “D”, forming a “cent” sign.

So, there is a “1’, “D” decodes to “3”, there is a “C” which means 100, and a “cent” sign.

“1300 cents”, or “$13.00”. And following Oswald’s strict board-game rules, we can make the full expression on the label: “Oswald $13 Gift”.

And, of course, when Oswald was arrested, he had $13 in his wallet, obviously I gather, because he feared he’d soon be dead. And he wanted to validate this very package-label puzzle as being his secret before-the-fact “gift”, hopefully to not remain a secret.

One last anagram for today that uses 12 primary letters with “F” left over:

“Win. 6.5 Sabot Ld.”, or spelled out fully, “Winchester 6.5mm Sabot Load.”

To me, because of the two abbreviated words, it’s not the most impressive “bona fide” anagram I’ve seen. But it’s interesting because of the information it reveals, and impressive by how it is mirrored on the label itself.

For those unfamiliar with a Sabot, as was I, it’s a coated slug that can be fired from a larger caliber rifle. If one wanted to preserve the ballistic markings on a particular slug fired through a particular rifle, like say a 6.5mm Carcano, one could reload that slug into a larger bore gun like, say a .270 Winchester, shoot somebody, and it would be theoretically provable that the shot came from the Carcano.

So this piece of information came from the primary letters on the label, and now let’s see if we can validate our anagram, “Win 6.5 Sabot Ld”, on the label itself. This is a must if we are to know, with some degree of certainty, that this is what he intended to tell us.

We’re going to look on the label at the word “West”.http://i1278.photobucket.com/albums/y520/TomHume440/nassaus_zpsd4b8f0a7.jpg

There’s a large lower-case “n” attached to the left wing of the “W”, a lowercase “r” over the top of that, a dotted “i” in the middle of the “W” and the “i” is dotted with a tiny little “e”.http://i1278.photobucket.com/albums/y520/TomHume440/quotequotinquotWquot_zps073c0e9f.jpg

West is the direction of “270” degrees, and these numbers decode to “CHA”.

In the word “West”, then, Oswald provided us with:

“Winerchaest”. And when we anagram this, we have:

“A Winchester”.

Then when we apply the “270”, we have:

“A .270 Winchester”

And all this is crammed into one word, “West”, on the label!

But we’re not done. Following Oswald’s very strict rules for making anagrams on the label itself (rules we can tease out - rules I touch on below), we can make (or find), “A .270 Winchester Sabot Load”.

I’ll do it quickly because it might be interesting to some, but if you find this aspect to tedious, skip the next five paragraphs.

The letter to the left of “West” is a “B” (decoded from “1”). The next letter is “A” (decoded from “0”). We learned in my last post that inside that “O” is an upside down “F” which decodes to a “5”. The next letter is “6”.

We’re trying to make “A .270 Winchester 6.5 Sabot Load”, and so far we’ve got “A .270 Winchester 6.5 ab.

Now we go to the “t” in “West” (and since we’ve already used “West”, we can travel across it). At the top of the “t” in “West”, there’s a vertical line, a connection, one of a very few for crossing from line to line; there’s a little arrow pointing to this connection and it leads us to a little “t” on top of the left wing of the “w” in “Oswald”.

At this busy crossroads point, the top of the little “t”, we can go right, left, down, or, we can follow the dotted line that ascends from the left of the little “t”, to meet the end of the tail-swoop of the letter “O”, which is right on top of the “s”. Following Oswald’s rules, we can finish our complete expression:

“A .270 Winchester 6.5 Sabot Load”.

So we have two things; a robust and pertinent anagram (only one of several) made from the thirteen primary letters on the label), that gives us, “Win. 6.5 Sabot Ld.”. And when we look to the larger label, we can use Oswald’s rules to navigate the label’s labyrinth, and find: “A .270 Winchester 6.5 Sabot Load”.

Easy if we’ve discovered an intended anagram, nearly impossible if not.

There are faces scattered all around this pixel-poor JPEG of a label, and they have an important function in solving Oswald’s puzzle.

Check this out:http://i1278.photobucket.com/albums/y520/TomHume440/Shaw3_zpsf2423301.jpghttp://i1278.photobucket.com/albums/y520/TomHume440/nassaus_zpsd4b8f0a7.jpg

Following some basic puzzle-type rules that Oswald laid down for us, rules that we can intuit by working with the puzzle, the name Clay Shaw can be made from the first four letters of “Oswald’s” name on the label (remember that there’s an “L” and an “H” inside the large “C” shaped formation in the “O”). If you’re wondering where the “Y” is, it’s black, and it appears to be hanging out of the mouth of this touched-up version of Clay Shaw. This photograph, or drawing, or whatever it is, is right between the “a” and the “l” in “Oswald”. We’re looking at a JPEG of a photo of package label containing a man’s picture that can’t be much more than a quarter of an inch square.

Next time I’ll tell you about the “OSWALD 13 BIT GIFT”. I think you’ll like it.

Tom

Some basic instructions navigating the game board – the label. This is a work in progress:

Start wherever you like on a walking trip through the label. For the most part, you need to stay on the line you’re on, moving from one letter to the next, picking up its value to your anagram, and putting in your pocket. You can go backwards or forwards, but not up or down unless you find a bridge. Using the simple code I gave you, letters can be changed into numbers and visa versa when the need arises. Some letters have other letters embedded in them, and some appear as another letter when turned upside down or sidewise. Also, letters and numbers can be used for other things they closely resemble; “zeros” can be used as “Os”, etc. Take whatever you need from the letter, and move on. If a letter has a face associated with it, be it a person, an animal, a cartoon face, or whatever, you’re entitled to skip that letter if you want. If you’re on one of the thirteen “primary letters”, you can jump to a neighboring “primary letter” on the same line. When you get to the end of a line, you can start at the next line as if you’re reading or typing, but you can move backwards or forwards. This is the only way to cross a line unless you find a bridge.

There’s a connection line, a bridge, between the “t” in “West”, and the “t” type structure on the left wing of the “w” in “Oswald” – this bridge has a little arrow pointing to it. This is a major crossroads, and from there you can move across the line to the “t” below, turn right to the “a” (which has man’s face inside), turn left to the “s”, or follow the dotted line up and to the left which leads you to the end of the “Os” tail-swoop near the top of the “s”, which this shortcut allows you to skip. When you’re at the little “t” crossroads, you can either use the “t/w”, or skip them both.

There’s also a cross-line connection at the “1” in “601” and the “D” in “Dallas”.

There may be other connections as well that are difficult to see do to the degraded quality of the label photo. My theory is this: The label photograph and the label portion of the package photograph are very different. The package photo looks pristine and was probably taken under bright lights. The label photo, as pixel-poor as it is, shows great detail that might be a result of the lighting that allowed the label’s glow-in-the-dark properties to be revealed.

Tom,

It's all rather complicated, isn't it.

Wouldn't you think Oswald expected the coded message to be noticed and solved right away?

And to think that the Internet hadn't even been invented yet!

Hey! Maybe that's why he was trying to reach John Hurt! You know, so he could decode it.

Look on the bright side, Tom. Even though you've been working on it for quite a while now at least you did have a major revelation about it just last evening!

(Somehow this all reminds me of Bevilaqua's decoding of the text of The Manchurian Candidate...)

Sincerely,

--Tommy :sun

At least he's trying something new and is looking for answers concerning a piece of evidence that no one else has ever been able to explain AND is no longer in the National Archives.

Lee,

Point taken.

I'm just wondering if it is realistic to think that Oswald expected that a coded message as elaborate as this one would be noticed and solved right away.

Thinking out loud here: I suppose the noticing of such a message would take longer than the solving of it, so if Oswald really did put a coded message on the package and expected it to be solved (or decoded) quickly, he must have intended for it o be received by someone who knew in advance that there would be a message on it.

Otherwise, he must have willing to wait fifty years for it to be discovered and solved by some JFK assassination researchers...

Sincerely,

--Tommy :sun

Edited by Thomas Graves
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Hi Kathy,

You might be on to something. I can’t think of a meaning for “H.E.”, but you got me looking for a D.H., or a H.D. (Harry D. Holmes?) (Howdy Doody?)

Here’s my anagram for Alek James Hidell:

Lee/HD JK/Elm Alias

Hi Lee,

The package has gone missing from the Archives? This is really bad news.

Hi Tommy,

I take your point. What did Oswald expect would happen to the package? It seems obvious that he was badly mistaken in thinking it would be recognized for what it was right off the bat.

My guess is that he assumed that others thought like he thought. The guy must have been a genius in some ways, maybe and idiot savant. There are puzzles inside of puzzles on top of puzzles, but when enough pieces are solved, one can notice that they relate to and reinforce each other. And everything is about November 22, 1963 – who, what, when, where, why, and how.

I’ve said in previous posts, that I’m no good at puzzles, and I don’t even like them. That’s a true statement. I lurked on this forum for years until Bernice posted a picture of the “Undeliverable Package”, and I was taken. For two and a half years I’ve not been able to let it go. The question I keep asking myself is, “Since I’m not very smart, how could it be that I recognized this thing for what it was, a puzzle, and nobody else has.”

I think Will Shorts, the “Puzzle Master” on NPR could spend 45 minutes on the label, see how it was organized, and solve some major pieces. There are people that are good at these sorts of things and it’s Damn sure not me.

Since I believe 100% that the “Oswald $13 Gift” is what I’m saying it is, my task is to present what I’ve learned from the puzzle well enough that others will recognize the package label for what it is and solve the various parts, so that serious investigators can take into consideration what Lee Oswald had to say – this is the only pertinent statement of Oswald’s that I know of.

Peace,

Tom

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I like puzzles, Tom. Drawing on an other post, Oswald gave 3601 North Beckley (which doesn't exist) as address for his PO box while he was living at 1026 (which does exist) and here is another PO related item with the numbers 601 1 (before the West Nassaua (which doesn't exist) is a line, l or 1.. ) ie, the numbers 0,1 and 6 with 1,2 and 3 as extras. (Don't get me started on North West. :) ) ?

Ok, I'll just babbble on by myself here. Please ignore. If the original poster objects I'll leave it.

So where we at.

601 1

1026

3601

the second one is 'real' 10 6

the first and third are 'false' 601, 601

1026 came first in Oswald life because otherwise why use 1,0 and 6? Unless it becomes a drop code at the time of 1026.

reversing the incorrects?

1106

1026

1063

?

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Tom

This gets more compelling with every post ,finding the picture must have been

A shock?

Ian

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Hi John,

Babble on. You and I have been talking about the package for years now, and if anything comes of this, I can honestly say that the early discoveries came from observations made by you. If nothing comes of this, I promise not to hold you responsible for wasting two years of my life (Im laughing out loud).

I'm a little dense though, and I'm not sure I'm following your train of thought on the "601". I, on the other hand, tend to get way to wordy, finding it very difficult to describe the solutions to the myriad of puzzle parts on this thing. I feel the need to talk through each detail but I think I loose a lot of folks by doing this. But at the same time, I want people to, (1) follow my train of thought, (2) check my work, (3) see how elegantly the puzzle was constructed (4) see how the information provided by one method of encryption, is mirrored by a completely different method of encryption, (4) come to believe 100%, as I do, that this is a complicated but solvable puzzle with a lot of information in it that weve all been wondering about for years.

The "601" was an amazing number for Oswald to have come up with:

Decoded to "GAB", its an anagram for "BAG". A bag was found in the package, and a whole lot of the puzzle centers around the "BAG", "LOs TWIN BAG" and what it was for.

I think the "6;01" tells us that the address label can be converted to 6-bit (6) binary code (01).

As I pointed out in a previous post, "601" turned upside down is "10;9" (as in PT-109). 10 and 9 decode to "KJ", and inside the "0" is a big fat "F", making "JFK". Immediately before the "JFK" is the expression "Mu" which roughly means, does not exist, like JFK. "Mu" decodes to "12:20", the time Oswald thought JFK's non-existence would happen.

"601" (GAB) is an anagram for Guy Banister's business "GBA", and the first two expressions on the address line, including imbedded letters, make the name "G W Banister".

And theres more to "601", so John, carry on and tell us all what you find.

Ian wrote: "This gets more compelling with every post, finding the picture must have been a shock?"

Hi Ian,

And it was a shock. But I've known about the Clay Shaw picture, as well as many others on the label, for a long time. But I was afraid that I was seeing faces in the clouds, so to speak, afraid that my mind was trying to make sense of photographic artifacts. It wasn't until I saw that there was a pattern to where the pictures were being placed, their usefulness to the puzzle, that I knew I wasn't just making stuff up.

Put Gary Murr's version of the photo on the best photo program you have, and fool with the editing control. There's lots of stuff to look at, and then you can wonder how Oswald made it all happen.

http://www.jfkresearch.freehomepage.com/murr.htm

Tom

Edited by Tom Hume
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Thanks Tom. It's been interesting and continues to be so. Admittedly I'm a bit less widesweeping with my speculations. At the moment I'm contemplating percieved significance in what may be with closer scrutiny reasonably dismissed as statistically expected. I knew about these items but not the wrong address put on the slip for PO box hire or if I read it made nothing of it. I've looked into other PO (HDH) items in detail. I'm assuming they are signed by HDH. I know the 'suspicious envelope' is, I know HDH signed many (and kept the originals) P.C. items.

Interesting you see the pictures. I have tried to see what may have been inside the envelope and how it was opened which determines the max size of the object that was in there by looking at creases and smudges and explaining what happened to it when flat and when stuffed and after. How it was made et.c. . when I saw the line next to West assassin jumped out. I when looking for where the address may refer to zeroed in on a propert due south. Still all just speculations, but why not? I try to keep the original thought in mind which often stems from an interest in puzzles and one of the most puzzling person to me is HDH.

---

Once he lived at 1026 he had a reason or someone had a reason to make a letter with the numbers 601 in it, When a third came along and when that third is a false as well I feel the consequences are piling up. Interesting, and fun imo. Keep on.

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Thanks Tom. It's been interesting and continues to be so. Admittedly I'm a bit less widesweeping with my speculations. At the moment I'm contemplating percieved significance in what may be with closer scrutiny reasonably dismissed as statistically expected. I knew about these items but not the wrong address put on the slip for PO box hire or if I read it made nothing of it. I've looked into other PO (HDH) items in detail. I'm assuming they are signed by HDH. I know the 'suspicious envelope' is, I know HDH signed many (and kept the originals) P.C. items.

Interesting you see the pictures. I have tried to see what may have been inside the envelope and how it was opened which determines the max size of the object that was in there by looking at creases and smudges and explaining what happened to it when flat and when stuffed and after. How it was made et.c. . when I saw the line next to West assassin jumped out. I when looking for where the address may refer to zeroed in on a propert due south. Still all just speculations, but why not? I try to keep the original thought in mind which often stems from an interest in puzzles and one of the most puzzling person to me is HDH.

---

Once he lived at 1026 he had a reason or someone had a reason to make a letter with the numbers 601 in it, When a third came along and when that third is a false as well I feel the consequences are piling up. Interesting, and fun imo. Keep on.

Guys,

IF Oswald killed Kennedy, maybe he did so only to draw attention to these coded messages so that fifty years later we would decode them and realize how clever he was!

Just kidding.

I'm sure he thought the package would be received by someone who knew the code and would spring him from jail before anything really really bad could happen to him...

--Tommy :sun

Edited by Thomas Graves
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http://www.jfkresearch.freehomepage.com/murr.htm

Hi John,

I wouldn't be surpised to learn that most everyone suspected that Im seeing coincidences and creating scenarios in my mind out of a meaningless label. And I can't tell you how many times I've considered this myself after making stupid connective assumptions.

Oswald's puzzle isn't solved yet and it won't be me that solves it. It will be people that are good at this sort of thing, individually or collectively, assembling the pieces of the tale being told. What I'm mainly trying to do is to show as many connections as I can, as clearly as I can, so that those real puzzle-solvers will notice it is a puzzle and that it's one woth solving. If and when, in my amateurish way, I can present enough meaningful connections to convince those real puzzle-solvers, I'm done.

I know you've spent some time trying to figure what might have been in the package itself by looking at its characteristics, but I'm taking a different approach; seeing if Oswald will tell me.

BAG is "601", and it seems so far to be one of the central issues of both the puzzle and his life. It's the very first controllable expression on the label, and a BAG is supposedly what was found in the package. Why was it in there? Whats the big deal about this long paper sack? Without all of the pieces of the puzzle solved, it might not be time to start drawing conclusions, but asking what-if questions can lead to new discoveries.

"F" is the very first letter on the label in the word "For", and when we look there, we find the name "F Fiorini" imbedded - it seems to be all there in Oswald style scewball letters - "F Fiorini".

For those that don't want to take my word for this, and you shouldn't, you really need to to put Gary Murr's version of the label photo on your computer photo program and manipulate the controls to bring out the details.

John, since you've been studying the package itself, I'm sure youve seen the big "N" just below where the FBI defiled the package with their Q265 identification mark (sorry, the photo is sideways and I can't seem to fix it right now).

http://i1278.photobucket.com/albums/y520/TomHume440/quotZquotPackage_zps5a13ffb9.jpg

"N" decodes to 13 and it's very important to this puzzle too. There are 13 Primary Letters on the label used to make informative anagrams. The "1" and the "D" (decodes to "3") are the only two primary letters that are connected, and together they make "13". Oswald in fact had thirteen dollars in his wallet, and he tells us about it both on the label and in his 13-letter anagram form.

Tom

Edited by Tom Hume
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