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JFK was killed 'by a mystery bullet': Nurse claims


Douglas Caddy
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We certainly have heard from individuals at Parkland that the bullet recovered there was a sharp nosed round, easily recognized by any hunter and not the blunt nosed CE399 entered officially

into WC evidence.

Mark Oakes has done interviews with Parkland employees you describe that in some detail. And of course it tallies well with all the issues in the chain of possession for CE399.

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I don't think this nurse had anything to do with the treatment of Kennedy in Trauma room 1, and she was probably not in that room while Kennedy was there. Hospital administrator Price had everyone involved in the treatment of Kennedy and/or Connally make written statements about their activities, and there is no such statement from any Phyllis Hall (although she could have used a different name at taht time), but Price himself mentions (page 105 on Price exhibit) that a 'Phyllis' phoned him to tell President Kennedy was being brought to the hospital:

"This is Phyllis, the President's been shot and they're bringing him to our Emergency Room"

http://www.history-matters.com/archive/jfk/wc/wcvols/wh21/pdf/WH21_Price_Ex_2-35.pdf

Bjørn Gjerde

Edited by Bjørn Gjerde
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Bjorn, I would only add that we have been told by at least one of the very earliest junior interns to arrive in the room, who spoke at a Lancer conference, that the earliest arrivals were quickly displaced by senior staff arriving - the room was relatively quite small. He said that senior staff essentially pushed the earliest responders out of the room and of course conducted the actual treatment. I suspect those folks might not have been considered as being technically part of the treatment.

Of course that certainly does not confirm her presence and she might well be elaborating in any event. However I think its worth noting that everything did not always get wrapped up and documented as nicely and neatly as the records might suggest...

Edited by Larry Hancock
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Bjorn, Larry, et al.

While I agree with the assessment that Price exhibited due diligence in asking those involved with the treatment afforded not only Kennedy and John Connally but also the mortally wounded Oswald when he was brought to Parkland on Sunday to commit their efforts to the written page, I do know that not everyone present and theoretically "involved" in these same efforts of care presented Price with a written account of their roles, regardless of how minor it may have been. Whether or not the historical record suffers to any great extent because of this is difficult to assess. In support of what Larry has already indicated, I personally contacted and interviewed both junior interns and nurses aides and students who were present at Parkland on that day regarding what, if anything, their role may have been, these overtures on my part initiated in conjunction with my work on the wounding of John Connally. In the main most observations were just that, observations of bystanders close to the event, though there was one exception of potentially great importance. However, what I have found interesting is that in examining the Price record, both as submitted to the Warren Commission and as originally gathered by the Secret Service, one glaring omission stands out. Nurse Jeanette Standridge was very involved with the initial care and treatment afforded John Connally. However, when one searches this Price record for her account all you will find is her written report of what she was involved in on November 24th regarding the admission and care attempts to save Oswald's life; there appears to be no surviving written record prepared by Ms. Standridge indicating just what she was involved in during the care afforded John Connally, this even though there are numerous indications from others who present their accounts of PMH maneuverings on November 22nd that mention Standridge. And while it is true that Standridge was eventually deposed by Arlen Specter, there remains no handwritten/typed account prepared by Standridge of just what she did on November 22nd. If nothing else she was and remains an important link in the chain of possession for the clothing of John Connally, not to mention certain personal items that were found in the Connally clothing itself.

FWIW

Gary Murr

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Bjorn, Larry, et al.

While I agree with the assessment that Price exhibited due diligence in asking those involved with the treatment afforded not only Kennedy and John Connally but also the mortally wounded Oswald when he was brought to Parkland on Sunday to commit their efforts to the written page, I do know that not everyone present and theoretically "involved" in these same efforts of care presented Price with a written account of their roles, regardless of how minor it may have been. Whether or not the historical record suffers to any great extent because of this is difficult to assess. In support of what Larry has already indicated, I personally contacted and interviewed both junior interns and nurses aides and students who were present at Parkland on that day regarding what, if anything, their role may have been, these overtures on my part initiated in conjunction with my work on the wounding of John Connally. In the main most observations were just that, observations of bystanders close to the event, though there was one exception of potentially great importance. However, what I have found interesting is that in examining the Price record, both as submitted to the Warren Commission and as originally gathered by the Secret Service, one glaring omission stands out. Nurse Jeanette Standridge was very involved with the initial care and treatment afforded John Connally. However, when one searches this Price record for her account all you will find is her written report of what she was involved in on November 24th regarding the admission and care attempts to save Oswald's life; there appears to be no surviving written record prepared by Ms. Standridge indicating just what she was involved in during the care afforded John Connally, this even though there are numerous indications from others who present their accounts of PMH maneuverings on November 22nd that mention Standridge. And while it is true that Standridge was eventually deposed by Arlen Specter, there remains no handwritten/typed account prepared by Standridge of just what she did on November 22nd. If nothing else she was and remains an important link in the chain of possession for the clothing of John Connally, not to mention certain personal items that were found in the Connally clothing itself.

FWIW

Gary Murr

Is Ms. Standridge still alive?

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Bjorn, Larry, et al.

While I agree with the assessment that Price exhibited due diligence in asking those involved with the treatment afforded not only Kennedy and John Connally but also the mortally wounded Oswald when he was brought to Parkland on Sunday to commit their efforts to the written page, I do know that not everyone present and theoretically "involved" in these same efforts of care presented Price with a written account of their roles, regardless of how minor it may have been. Whether or not the historical record suffers to any great extent because of this is difficult to assess. In support of what Larry has already indicated, I personally contacted and interviewed both junior interns and nurses aides and students who were present at Parkland on that day regarding what, if anything, their role may have been, these overtures on my part initiated in conjunction with my work on the wounding of John Connally. In the main most observations were just that, observations of bystanders close to the event, though there was one exception of potentially great importance. However, what I have found interesting is that in examining the Price record, both as submitted to the Warren Commission and as originally gathered by the Secret Service, one glaring omission stands out. Nurse Jeanette Standridge was very involved with the initial care and treatment afforded John Connally. However, when one searches this Price record for her account all you will find is her written report of what she was involved in on November 24th regarding the admission and care attempts to save Oswald's life; there appears to be no surviving written record prepared by Ms. Standridge indicating just what she was involved in during the care afforded John Connally, this even though there are numerous indications from others who present their accounts of PMH maneuverings on November 22nd that mention Standridge. And while it is true that Standridge was eventually deposed by Arlen Specter, there remains no handwritten/typed account prepared by Standridge of just what she did on November 22nd. If nothing else she was and remains an important link in the chain of possession for the clothing of John Connally, not to mention certain personal items that were found in the Connally clothing itself.

FWIW

Gary Murr

That not everyone who'd worked on the president was accounted for in the early reports is undoubtedly true.

When one looks at the "Parkland witnesses," the witnesses most researchers believe unanimously recalled seeing a wound on the back of Kennedy's head, and tries to track down their statements to 11-22-63, one finds that only a handful of them recorded what they'd witnessed prior to the wound being called a wound on the back of the head in newspapers and magazines. Some of the witnesses made no record of their thoughts before they testified before the Warren Commission. And still others were without comment for decades afterward.

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Bjorn, Larry, et al.

While I agree with the assessment that Price exhibited due diligence in asking those involved with the treatment afforded not only Kennedy and John Connally but also the mortally wounded Oswald when he was brought to Parkland on Sunday to commit their efforts to the written page, I do know that not everyone present and theoretically "involved" in these same efforts of care presented Price with a written account of their roles, regardless of how minor it may have been. Whether or not the historical record suffers to any great extent because of this is difficult to assess. In support of what Larry has already indicated, I personally contacted and interviewed both junior interns and nurses aides and students who were present at Parkland on that day regarding what, if anything, their role may have been, these overtures on my part initiated in conjunction with my work on the wounding of John Connally. In the main most observations were just that, observations of bystanders close to the event, though there was one exception of potentially great importance. However, what I have found interesting is that in examining the Price record, both as submitted to the Warren Commission and as originally gathered by the Secret Service, one glaring omission stands out. Nurse Jeanette Standridge was very involved with the initial care and treatment afforded John Connally. However, when one searches this Price record for her account all you will find is her written report of what she was involved in on November 24th regarding the admission and care attempts to save Oswald's life; there appears to be no surviving written record prepared by Ms. Standridge indicating just what she was involved in during the care afforded John Connally, this even though there are numerous indications from others who present their accounts of PMH maneuverings on November 22nd that mention Standridge. And while it is true that Standridge was eventually deposed by Arlen Specter, there remains no handwritten/typed account prepared by Standridge of just what she did on November 22nd. If nothing else she was and remains an important link in the chain of possession for the clothing of John Connally, not to mention certain personal items that were found in the Connally clothing itself.

FWIW

Gary Murr

Is Ms. Standridge still alive?

Hello Robert:

No, unfortunately Standridge died in October of 2004 in Richland Hills, Texas, a "suburb" of Fort Worth, at the ripe old age of 90. I attempted to open a dialogue with the aging Standridge in the late 1990's with no success, which of course was her prerogative.

Gary

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