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More on the Rifle Scope


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However, for the above reasons, it was necessary for the gunsmith at Klein's to make a further modification to the scope.

Bob,

At the moment I can't find the source of the quote, but according to the Klein's gunsmith, they did NOT mount scopes on the Carcano model allegedly sent to LHO. Only on the longer type. IIRC, this was discovered when Kleins asked the FBI "how" they wanted the scopes mounted on the rifles the FBI ordered for test purposes.

Tom

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Chris,

Actually he is drawing a simpler path than the official version.

West is looking at him expecting the end result to be a hop-scotch variation.

P.S. Since the WC were experts on tripods up on the 6th floor, Shaneyfelt felt right at home helping West with his theodolite.

West.jpg

Edited by Chris Davidson
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Bob,

The mount on the LHO gun seems to have three mounting holes and this one has four, although looking closely reveals that the shape of the LHO mount around the holes could have been altered (cut diagonally), removing one hole. The instructions are interesting, I saved the image and rotated it so I could read what was available. Do you think Kleins mounted the scope or not?

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Hi Chris

The mounts supplied by Klein's were also used to mount scopes on a model of Mauser. For the Mauser, it was necessary to grind away a portion of the rear of the four-hole mount, leaving three holes on the base.

From what I can gather, it seems they had an excess of three hole mounts for the Mauser, and simply used them as is to mount scopes on Carcanos.

P.S.

I'd be interested to know what you were able to glean in the way of instructions from the photo I posted.

P.P.S.

I think it entirely possible Klein's might have mounted this scope.

Edited by Robert Prudhomme
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However, for the above reasons, it was necessary for the gunsmith at Klein's to make a further modification to the scope.

Bob,

At the moment I can't find the source of the quote, but according to the Klein's gunsmith, they did NOT mount scopes on the Carcano model allegedly sent to LHO. Only on the longer type. IIRC, this was discovered when Kleins asked the FBI "how" they wanted the scopes mounted on the rifles the FBI ordered for test purposes.

Tom

Hi Tom

Actually, it was the shorter carbine (17 inch barrel) that Klein's was mounting the scopes on, as opposed to the 21 inch barreled short rifle found on the 6th floor.

I find it very odd that Klein's would ask the FBI how they wanted the scopes mounted on the test rifles they ordered, as all Carcanos, be they a short rifle, long rifle or carbine, have the identical receiver and chamber on them. Once you know how to mount a scope on a carbine, the procedure should be identical on the other rifles, and I cannot see any other way to mount a scope on a Carcano than the way they did.

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I had planned to write more about the scope but, I'm beginning to doubt if one of the things I stated about the way Klein's mounted the scope is true or not. Once again, the scope:

3689837907_6d1a59bce2_b.jpg

As you all may or may not know, rifle scopes inevitably have the elevation adjustment cap on the top, and the windage adjustment cap on the right side of the scope, as viewed from the rear. On C2766, and presumably all the other Carcanos that Klein's mounted scopes on, the windage cap is on the left, opposite of what is normal. I was told, by what I considered a reliable source, that Klein's had elected to do this for the same reason the scope is offset to the left; that being it would not be possible to load the en bloc clip into the magazine with the scope or the windage cap above the magazine.

Looking at the above photo, I am now beginning to wonder if the Ordnance Optics 4x18 scope was not manufactured with the windage cap on the left, and if it might have been specifically selected by Klein's to mount on Carcanos because of this unique feature. If the scope in the photo was turned 90° to the right, the printing would almost be upside down. Wouldn't a manufacturer want his name to appear in a legible fashion?

I currently have feelers out on a number of forums to see if I can find someone who owns one of these scopes. Answering my question should be as easy as removing the caps and seeing which one says "<UP-DOWN>" and which one says "<LEFT-RIGHT>".

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I'd be interested to know what you were able to glean in the way of instructions from the photo I posted.

Unfortunately, not very much.

Here's a basic overview:

Instructions

for the fitting and care of your riflescope

Mounting

Left paragraph - loosen all the clamp screws util the xxx slides easily onto the receiver of <pretty much undecipherable after that>

Right paragraph

<Instructions for adjusting eye relief>

Adjustments

*set the adjusting screws…

*Try a test shot, or site through….

<rest unclear>

Power Change on Zoom Scope

<pretty much obscured by bend in paper>

Parallax Adjustment

Parallax is removed at the factory. In general, parallax is corrected for the object at 100 yards.

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That's too bad, Chris. I was hoping something unique, though I have no idea what.

I'm not having a lot of luck getting info on the windage adjustment cap. I might try something a little different. I saw a post on a firearms thread from one of the managers of a company that purchased the remaining stock of 4x18 scopes when the Ordnance Optics Inc. went out of business. He left a phone number on this post, and I actually spoke to the man earlier this year. If I can find the number, I'll try again.

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I found one post on a forum from a guy selling grooved end covers for the eyepiece. It seems the original Ordnance Optics sights tapered down from the end in a straight line and had a grooved adjust ring at the end closest to the shooter (or maybe it wasn't an adjustable ring it was just a grooved end piece). The newer Ordnance sights of the same type taper in a curve and have a smooth end without grooves. If you look at the photo of the extant Carcano and compare it to most of the "Knock-offs" people are selling online you will see the differences and what I mean.

The one posted in the photo above appears to be one of the "correct" older scopes because the eye piece housing tapers in a straight line.

Edited by Chris Newton
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