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Lessons learned from my journey with Dennis


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Hi:

More than a century after Newcomen built his engine, and generations after Watt built his improved engine, Sadi Carnot began to develop the theory of why heat engines worked and what their energetic limits were, and he developed his famed equation. When Carnot wrote, wind and water power were still competitive with steam power. Carnot, like all pioneers, was ahead of his time, and it was not until the mid-19th century that the science of energy began to develop. Around Carnot’s time, Michael Faraday began making seminal contributions to the study of electricity and magnetism, James Clerk Maxwell made his contributions a generation later, Rudolf Clausius introduced the concept of entropy and more fully elucidated Carnot’s idea, and the man who became Lord Kelvin was doing what became thermodynamic work at the same time. In the last half of the 19th century, science was galloping along, and people such as Heisenberg later said that scientists began to get too full of themselves, becoming philosophers and losing sight of the inherent limitations of their discipline. Science is a great approach for exploring how our reality works, if the limits of the discipline are recognized, such as the understanding that physical reality is not the only reality. The greatest scientists generally had worldviews that verged on the mystical.

But new horizons of science opened up continually. Even so, when Thomas Edison developed his light bulb in 1879, there was a chorus of derision and statements of “fraud” and “impossible” from the scientific community, as they refused to see for themselves. Every era of the human journey has had its self-satisfied intellectuals who though that they had it all figured out, and Max Planck eventually remarked that scientists almost never see the light in their lifetimes when it appears, but go to their graves rabidly clinging to their invalid pet theories. The new generation grows up familiar with the new theories and does not reject them, and it has been said that science progresses funeral by funeral. :)

Going back to Newton and onward to Einstein and Heisenberg, the greatest scientific and mathematical minds have generally made their greatest contributions before age 30, and by age 40, a scientist rarely makes great theoretical contributions. I believe that it is due to few reasons, one of which is that the human brain is operating at peak capacity in early adulthood, and another is that people tend to fall victim to their points of view, building their sense of identity on those views, and like those dogmatic scientists, will cling to their points of view until death. As I have written plenty, the only candidates for what I am doing had to be already awakened past their conditioning in some way, and it has always had to be based on their experience, not a received teaching or literature review. My work, for instance, cannot wake anybody up.

The steam engine is a quintessential example of how technology had a long lead on the theory that explained its operation. When the Wright brothers first flew, powered flight was declared “impossible” by the experts, and scientists ridiculed and ignored the Wright brothers for five years after they first flew. That failing of scientists is alive and well today, and not long before he died, Brian O said that mainstream science was even more rigid and dogmatic on that score today than it was when the Wright brothers first flew. Scientists as a whole have still not learned that lesson, and one of the primary objections by scientists to the idea of free energy is that it would be contrary to the “laws of physics,” when the very term betrays how much today’s science resembles a religion. There are no “laws” of physics, only theories, but in the 19th century, all sorts of scientific musings had the term “law” appended to them, even when there was no experimental evidence for them. Pasteur once came up with an idea and immediately called it a law, named after himself, of course. :) One of Brian’s “favorite” reactions to the idea of free energy, back when he played the Paul Revere of Free Energy, was the elderly dean of the physics department where Brian once studied pedantically thrusting his finger into the air, as he announced that the idea of free energy was contrary to the “laws of physics.”

All of that scientific egocentrism was little different from European “explorers” naming every landmark they “discovered” after themselves, as they conquered Earth. Africa, the Americas, Australia, and elsewhere are richly labeled with European names

To expect a fully elucidated physics to appear before free energy technology does, which explains it, it is be ignorant of the history of science and technology, but it is the standard reaction of scientists today. What my friend saw turns today’s physics textbooks into doorstops, and the so-called law of gravity becomes something else when you watch antigravity technology in action.

Best,

Wade

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Hi:

I am going to expand on the previous post a little. History’s most successful experiments have often been “failures” that produced unexpected results. The Michelson-Morley experiment was the most sensitive one ever performed on light to its time, and it produced an expected result that was not explained until Einstein’s theory of special relativity, a generation later.

Similarly, experiments discovered phenomena, but they would not be explained by theory for many years. In the 1820s, Joseph Fourier calculated that Earth should be much colder than it is, and hypothesized that atmospheric gases were responsible for insulating Earth, but he had no idea which ones or how. In the 1850s, John Tyndall performed experiments that demonstrated which atmospheric gases absorbed infrared radiation. But it was not until the development of quantum theory in the 20th century that the reason why certain gases absorbed certain frequencies of electromagnetic radiation was understood. So, it took a century from the first observations/calculations to the theory that could explain them.

Natives and Arabs knew how to cure scurvy when Europeans began conquering the world, and arrogant Europeans ignored the cures for centuries, while millions of people died on the sailing ships. Even when British experiments showed that citrus fruit and fresh vegetables cured scurvy, it still took centuries for the British Navy to recognize the findings and provide limes to its sailing crews, and “limeys” ruled the Seven Seas. But it was not until the 20th century that vitamin C was isolated and understood as the cause and cure of scurvy. Practice predated theory by several centuries, in that instance.

Malaria was prevented by quinine for generations before anybody knew why. The empirics were far ahead of the theorists, and the same holds for free energy inventors today. Sparky Sweet wrote papers on why his FE gizmo worked, but there was still plenty of mystery, and anything that works by making time run backwards is going to strain brains. The physics that can explain why Sparky’s device worked, or explain the mind-boggling technologies that my friend was shown, certainly does not exist in mainstream theorizing, although some of science’s greatest minds thought that there was something “out there” in “empty space” that somebody like Sparky could learn to harness. I have had to receive the “skepticism” and dismissal of Sparky’s experimental results from scientists because there was not a robust physics to explain them (or they did not have one of Sparky’s gizmos delivered to their laboratories for testing). How naïve and ignorant. Although experiments are still performed, nobody is quite sure why Brown’s Gas works or what it actually is. The inventors of Dennis’s heat pump cut their performance data in half so that they would stop being laughed out of engineering offices for their “impossible” data. Microscopes have existed for nearly a century that defy mainstream optical theory, and so on.

The physics textbooks are going to have to be completely rewritten when those technologies not only come in from the shadows and fringes, but we develop some idea for why they work. My current understanding is that much of the exotic technology that my friend was shown was developed by reverse-engineering “captured” ET technology, so even in the Black Science world, their understanding is likely very crude at best, partly because humanity’s understanding of consciousness is so primitive, still relegated by mainstream science to a byproduct of chemical reactions in the brain. Until the religion of this Epoch, materialism, is relinquished, its adherents won’t begin to understand.

Best,

Wade

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Hi:

When Carnot produced his seminal paper, he still used the phlogiston concept. It was not until the 1850s that the phlogiston, or caloric, theory was finally replaced with the kinetic one. If we recall the definition of temperature, Carnot’s theory was really about the energy of motion, and how atoms in motion will collide with other atoms and give up their energy. What it really says is that energy always runs “downhill” to lower energy states, and entropy (atomic disorder) always increases, ever since that Big Bang. The Big Bang is challenged in various corners, even by arch-materialists such as Sean Carroll, who argue more for quantum events being the “birth” of the universe, although in his conception, the universe is infinitely old. The idea of a “quantum” birth of the universe is gaining popularity amongst scientists. But however the energy of our universe arrived, the second law of thermodynamics is Carnot’s work dressed up in the kinetic theory, and it essentially says that not all atomic/molecular motion can be directed into useful work (such as pushing a piston in an automobile engine), but is going to be lost to molecular disorder, which is always increasing, similar to the idea of a constantly expanding universe.

Einstein had the most confidence that the so-called second law would survive when all other theories eventually fell by the wayside, including his. But early in my days with Dennis, we encountered scientists who challenged the second law, but that will come later in this series of posts.

About the time that the kinetic theory replaced the caloric theory, heat engines began supplanting wind and water power in industrialization nations, particularly the UK and USA. The basics of heat engines really have not changed since Newcomen (or even Heron). They have just become more efficient. Whereas Newcomen’s engine had a 1% efficiency and Watt’s had a 5% efficiency, today’s steam turbines in electric power plants get about a 40% efficiency, and reusing the exhaust heat to power another heat engine can get up to about 50% efficient in turning heat into work. But just looking at absolute efficiency can be misleading. What I think is more informative is how close to the Carnot ideal a heat engine is, and for that, you need to know the temperatures of the heat sinks that the heat engine operates between. For a steam turbine that achieves 2,000 degree F boiler temperatures, and exhausts its turbine output to a lake, to cool down the working fluid (often water) so that it can be reintroduced to the boiler, it is achieving a 40% absolute efficiency, or about half of the Carnot ideal. The 60% that is not converted to work is lost as heat, or more molecularly, the disorder of molecules in the surrounding environment, which came into contact with the heat engine, or was hit by the photons given off.

Some cities use that waste heat to warm up their buildings and streets, particularly in cold climates such as what Scandinavia and Russia experience. Modern automobile engines get about 25-30% efficiency.

Today, the direction of research in increasing heat engine efficiency is designing electric company turbine components out of ceramics, to achieve 4,000 degree F temperatures, and the components won’t melt, so that perhaps 60% thermal efficiencies can be attained.

I will now come to the first horse in the race, as far as my energy journey went. Mr. Mentor invented his engine in a flash at a stop light in 1968, and went home and sketched it out in a half hour. The federal government brought in a literal rocket scientist to analyze Mr. Mentor’s engine, who soon became that engine’s greatest champion. He was amazed by the engine, but perhaps more so by how Mr. Mentor came up with it. He told Mr. Mentor that it would usually take a team of talented engineers their entire careers to invent what came to Mr. Mentor in an instant at a stop sign. That engine became a huge deal when the USA had the energy crisis that ended the most prosperous era of the human journey so far.

There were several ingenious features of Mr. Mentor’s engine, and the first was what he called the pressure intensifier. The intensifier made the working fluid work on itself, turning a low pressure gas into a high pressure liquid. The drive train was powered by that hydraulic liquid, and another ingenious aspect of his engine was that when the automobile “braked,” the drive train reversed itself and acted as a pump to put the kinetic energy of the car’s motion back into the hydraulic reservoir. It was like recovering the gasoline of combustion and putting it back into the gas tank.

In an internal combustion-driven automobile, the greatest energy losses of that 25-30% that is not wasted to heat is to friction, particularly the friction of the tires on the pavement and wind resistance as the car speeds up. That wind resistance increases as the square of the velocity. Ideally, a car should get far higher MPG in the city, where it is moving relatively slowly, than on the highway as it speeds along, but the opposite is true, as highway MPG is higher than city MPG. That is because of the energy lost to braking. Mr. Mentor’s engine recycled the energy otherwise lost to braking, and the experts who studied that engine estimated that a mail truck, for instance, puttering through neighborhoods, would get about 200 MPG.

In the wake of the energy crisis, a huge federal study was mounted to explore alternatives to internal combustion engines. It quickly focused on Mr. Mentor’s engine and concluded that it was by far the best known engine for powering an automobile. During the hoopla in the federal government, a high-ranking official informed Mr. Mentor that if he thought that his engine would be embraced by Detroit, that he had better make his funeral plans first. As usual, a group (likely related to the industrialist who expressed interest back then) stole Mr. Mentor’s design and drove a prototype in the Rose Parade in the late 1970s. I think that I heard of their fate a decade later, as they were kangarooed into prison, which gave me a preview of how our own energy efforts would fare.

A decade later, Mr. Mentor and a colleague began building their own vapor-injection carburetor, and when they discovered the Detroit owned all of the vapor-injection carburetor patents, they wisely stopped their efforts. Over the next decade, I came upon several instances of vapor-injection carburetors being bought out or wiped out.

That largely concludes my heat engine discussion, and next comes heat pumps, or the other side of Carnot’s seminal equation.

Best,

Wade

Edited by Wade Frazier
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Hi:

Heat pumps came after heat engines, by more than a century, because they required more sophisticated technology and advances in chemistry. For a heat engine, all that was required was iron, coal, and water, and a relatively simple design. For a heat pump, a different working fluid had to be used (with a lower boiling point than water), and ether and ammonia were early refrigerants, and evaporators and expansion valves were needed. The first successful commercial refrigeration operation was in the 1860s. It was not until the 1930s, with the invention of non-toxic Freon, that the world’s most common heat pump – the household refrigerator – began use.

I describe how refrigerators work, and the flip side of Carnot’s equation describes their limits of efficiency. I present some calculations, but the gist is this: if a heat engine operates between two heat sinks, and the Carnot ideal is for a thermal efficiency of 25%, a heat pump operating between those heat sinks cannot have a coefficient of performance (COP) of more than four (or one divided by 25%). That is the Carnot ideal in a nutshell, and that means that hooking up a heat engine to a heat pump can never produce free energy, as the only way that it could produce free energy would be to achieve “overunity,” such as a heat engine with a 30% efficiency, and a heat pump with a COP of four (30% x 4 = 120%). According to Carnot’s theory, achieving anything over 100% is “impossible,” working between the same two heat sinks, and in practice, the best heat engines and heat pumps achieve only about half of the Carnot ideal, and their combination would be only 25% (50% x 50%). Over 100% (“overunity”) means “free energy,” which is what we were pursuing in 1987. Dennis’s original idea was naïve.

If you think about it in terms of the molecules in the working fluids, they are going to lose energy to the environment, and every unit of heat lost to the environment means a reduction of that ideal 100%. If there was no loss at all, and the heat pump and heat engine were perfectly efficient, all of the energy provided by the heat engine would be needed to run the heat pump, and there would not be any excess energy to harvest.

That is Carnot 101, and we got quoted that equation early and often. I am going to cover it more, but I want to cover heat pumps more, first. The refrigeration industry replaced the ice industry, and it would not be until homes were electrified that refrigerators became practical household appliances. Otherwise, you needed a heat engine to run the refrigerator (or a watermill). Refrigeration helped make many modern cities possible. Transportation and refrigeration greatly expanded the hinterland of cities, and today, the hinterland is effectively global. At my grocery store, I can buy produce from the Middle East and New Zealand, not to mention East Asia.

What does refrigeration do? It slows down chemical reactions, and for households and the food industry, it means the chemical reactions of the microscopic organisms that will eat that food if given a chance. If those microorganisms can’t eat the food (or their rate of consumption is greatly reduced), then people can. That is the essence of household refrigeration.

To get more elementary, why do people live in houses? Why did they live in caves, then huts? To conserve their bodies’ energy, either through heat loss or predation. A warmer environment means less heat loss. All warm-blooded animals get out of the rain, because cool water and the latent heat of vaporization saps their energy. When viewed through the lens of energy, the reasons for most of life’s practices are easily discerned, including humanity’s.

When the environment gets too hot, or humans expend energy in exercising, they have to spend energy to cool down (refrigeration, if you will). So, in hot climates, air conditioning, which is only turning a house into a refrigerator, reduces the human expenditure of energy to maintain the ideal body temperature that human biology is adapted to, and that ideal temperature is the most important for optimal enzyme functioning, without which there would not be life on Earth today.

So, burning fuel to heat human-friendly environments, and refrigeration to cool them down. But what about refrigeration to heat them? That is a horse of a different color, and is what heat pumps were all about. However, conventional heat pumps get poor COPs, around two-to-one in the 1970s, and the best today don’t get over four and are usually around three. Direct burning of fossil fuels in a home, using 95% or more of that heat energy generated, beats using that fuel in an electric power plant and running heat pumps with it (40% X 2 = 80%). Electricity is generally four times as expensive as natural gas, so heat pumps did not really make much sense to heat a home in the USA, and heat pumps really only made a kind of sense if they could also be used to cool the home in the summer.

Heat pumps used electricity, so increased electricity sales, and electric companies would often promote heat pumps as a way to compete with coal, gas, and oil heating. Partly because they were used in the summer for cooling, heat pumps were generally put in the shade someplace, so that they worked in the summer (if it was in the sunshine, that would make it hard to shed the heat at the condenser, as the cooler the condenser, the better it worked). Their evaporators looked like car radiators, and for the same purpose, of air blowing across the fin-and-tube array, to facilitate the heat exchange. Again, back in the 1970s, they only got a COP of about two, and along came LamCo.

Best,

Wade

Edited by Wade Frazier
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Hi:

One thing that many people do is compare my work to others’, or let me know that those others could be allies, and so on. Well, nobody’s work is really like mine, although some of us cover similar subject matter. If Bucky Fuller was still alive, his work might be pretty close to mine, but the work of others that I hear about is usually similar in superficial ways, or they tackle some aspect of my work, but stay on that relatively narrow aspect. Some do good jobs with their material, and some not so good, and some is outright disinformation, through either malicious intent or gullibility/incompetence.

I’ll say this, however, for two bodies of work that I regularly hear about: Steven Greer’s and Richard Dolan’s. I write about Greer’s work plenty on my site, Brian O wrote the foreword to his latest book, and Greer spoke at the NEM conference that I bankrolled to get going, and I took a break from the registration table to hear him speak. Greer’s work is not disinformation, IMO, and confirmed many events during my free energy adventures, including what is in Godzilla’s Golden Hoard and how Godzilla throws around billions of dollars of bribes like confetti before he begins to play rough. I lived through events like he described, many years before I heard him talk, read his writings, or watched Disclosure Project witnesses describe their experiences, including those exotic technologies. That stuff is all real. Greer is trying the populist route, just like Dennis and Brian did, and it won’t work, IMO, and carrying their spears for many years helped lead to my current approach. Even if Greer was the right man for that job, it won’t work, IMO, and Greer has been too damaged by the meat grinder, taking the Über-warrior approach, to be effective as a man-of-the-people populist to go storming the ramparts. Dennis and Brian were much better qualified, but they did not stand a chance with their approach, either.

Richard Dolan is an academic who developed his “Breakaway Civilization” hypothesis. If you want to call Godzilla and friends a “Breakaway Civilization,” fine, but I don’t know how useful an academic model of them is. They are real, they have some megalomaniacal aspirations, and they can breakaway for all I care. I suppose, that for those in ignorance or denial of Godzilla’s existence, Dolan’s work has some value, but it is not going to help FE happen, IMO. I doubt that it hurts any, but it also doesn’t help much, and encourages that conspiracist focus on Godzilla and friends, which has never been productive behavior, as far as I have seen. I just salute Godzilla and go on my way, and do what I can to stay relatively low on his radar for now. Obsessing about Godzilla, or being in denial of him, are the two poles of delusion on that subject matter.

To people who continually drag such material to my doorstep, I’ll say this: what I am looking for is people who study my work, not to let me know about the latest YouTube presentation about Godzilla and friends or the latest New Age/conspiracist gossip. I wrote my big essay as a textbook, and learning the curriculum won’t be easy, but nothing worthwhile ever is. My hardest classes in college were always the most rewarding, and I am not saying that digesting my work is easy, but learning it is going to make people useful for my effort and it is really only a prerequisite. Greer’s and Dolan’s work are at the introductory level, suitable for the New Age equivalent of TED, and we have to go much deeper than that if we are going to make a dent.

While I am writing on the subject his morning, when people encounter my work and begin proselytizing to their social circles, and come away sobered up if not ostracized (and I always caution them not to, but they all have to run out and do it, even all of my best pupils), they are finding out the hard way what people who have had NDEs have learned. Whether is it NDEs, ETs, Godzilla, or FE, the masses “like” those ideas, if it is kept at the Hollywood/fictional level, but when they face it in real life, their primary reactions are denial and fear. As long as that stuff is kept at the gossip/tabloid/entertainment level, they enjoy the titillation, just like they do when watching the latest antics of the Kardashians and other celebrities, but when it comes to real life, people generally react with denial and fear, as it threatens their view of reality and their perceived place in the world.

Back to the science posts.

Best,

Wade

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Hi:

While I am writing about science, here is another post on its limitations. I just finished Moral Origins, and as I finished it, it reminded me of Fuller’s observation regarding the naïveté of scientists. The scientific ideal is a worthy one, even if it has never been truly achieved, like those other societal ideals.

What I found useful about Moral Origins was its going a little more deeply on hunter-gatherer social organization, particularly how bands kept self-aggrandizing alpha males in check, and other freeloaders. The author’s hypothesis on how human morality and the human conscience developed is worth taking seriously, but is also hampered by its materialism, and that author’s religious stance on materialism was made crystal clear by the book’s end. As I have stated many times, materialism is a philosophical or religious position, not a scientific one, but it is the religion of our Epoch.

In a nutshell, the author’s hypothesis is that when humans began to hunt big game in a sophisticated way, they developed a social organization conducive to it, which included how the bands shared in the kills. The author’s guess was that it began to happen about 250K years ago, when butchering became more professional. No animal likes being coerced, and the humans (pre-Homo sapiens) of 250K years ago seemed to have invented a social structure that allowed for the most band members to share in the spoils of hunting large animals, and keeping self-aggrandizing and dominating males in check was the cornerstone of their social organization. The author’s hypothesis is that social self-control began to become baked into the DNA back then, and he further elucidated an idea that humanity may have been culling bellicosity genes from its gene pool for hundreds of thousands of years.

That investigation of hunter bands, and going up the human line to the split between the human and chimp lines, is good work, but the author stopped at the Second Epoch, and the book’s epilogue dealt with current events, skipping entirely over the Third Epoch, and framed humanity’s current dilemmas in those genetic terms and hunter-gatherer dynamics, but issues such as elites, corporations, and the like were totally off his radar. When discussing current events, he could have benefitted from more Chomsky and Herman, and less Pinker, who is an imperial apologist. Scientists can be very good at describing how things work, but are often bereft of ideas on how to change things, especially in political-economics and social issues, or their proposals are hopelessly unworkable.

It is time for me to cut to the chase and get cracking on my essay update, and I’ll see if I can get it done this year. I will be devouring scientific studies until I can’t do it anymore, but I have enough under my belt for this year’s revision. I plan to add a “What’s new with this version” chapter at the front of the essay, and Moral Origins will have a limited place in it.

Best,

Wade

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Back to heat pumps and LamCo. When that Colorado cowboy and his engineer pal invented the LamCo heat pump, they were not thinking of the great thermodynamic advantage that that huge evaporator provided; they were just trying to make it look like the solar panels of the day. Not only was the great thermodynamic advantage a case of serendipity, they cut their performance data in half to stop getting laughed at by engineers who derided its “impossible” performance. It was far from impossible. As I recently wrote, long ago, when I looked at the data, I computed about half of the Carnot ideal, but when I ran an ambient of 50 degrees F, a hot water heat sink of 130 degrees and a COP of six, I got 88% of Carnot. But that was a swag. When I ran the numbers on Brian’s test, the one that he had to be reminded of on the witness stand, test A got 59% of Carnot. I do not know of a mainstream heat engine that ever got that close to the Carnot ideal, and let’s get into the physics of the LamCo heat pump a little.

The Carnot formula is the theoretical limit, and all practical heat pump and heat engine applications fall far short. What would make a heat engine or heat pump tend to the ideal? Reduced friction and reduced heat losses, for heat engines, is part of it. For heat engines and heat pumps, the less that the working fluid bangs against itself (turbulence), the more efficient the process will be. The water molecules in a steam turbine create useful work when they crash into the turbine blades, giving up their kinetic energy to the blade. To the extent that those molecules bang into each other, or the walls of the tubes leading to the turbine, the less energy is expended banging against the turbine blades. The ideal steam engine would have the water molecules go straight from the boiler to go banging against the turbine blades.

For heat pumps, there are similarities and differences to heat engines. A heat pump does not have to worry about heat loss, as the objective is to obtain heat. So, the most efficient heat exchangers are critical and those huge evaporators are the secret of the LamCo heat pump’s performance. Those huge surface areas (about 400 square feet of environmental contact) are why the LamCo heat pump’s COPs were so high. Another reason for the high COPs had nothing to do with ambient air temperature: those black panels could directly absorb photon energy. So, it could theoretically get higher COPs than the Carnot equation, as it got a boost from absorbed photon energy.

Also, all of that heat energy absorbed by the panel would be wasted if the other end of the arrangement, giving its heat to the higher-temperature heat sink, was not similarly efficient. Any bottleneck would kill the efficiency. Liquids are better than gases or solids for heat exchange, as solids don’t move and gases are far less dense, so can carry far less energy (each molecule carries the energy, so fewer molecules means less energy, at least at the same temperature). The LamCo heat pump was only going to work if it had a similarly efficient heat exchanger at the high-temperature heat sink, and from the beginning, the LamCo heat pump exchanged its heat with water, not air, as air-to-air heat pumps did.

One cost of the LamCo heat pump that the air-to-air heat pumps did not have was a large water tank. It did not have to have a large water tank, and many didn’t, but the advantage of a large water tank was storing the heat energy during the daytime, when the heat pump had higher COPs, and using it in the morning and evening, when most households needed the heat, not when everybody was asleep at night or away at work during the day. Notice how that Gannon’s installation had higher COPs in the daytime.

In practice, while an air-to-air heat pump held only a few pounds of refrigerant and delivered 50K BTUs to the home per hour at a COP of two, a properly designed and installed LamCo heat pump had 60 pounds of refrigerant and delivered 100K BTUs at a COP of six. That meant that it used only a third as much electrical energy (to run the pump) for every BTU of heat delivered to the home, and it delivered twice as many BTUs.

But as a retrofit installation, installed by the buyer half of the time, the quality was highly inconsistent, and the LamCo device did not have a good reputation until Dennis got involved and began industrializing the fledgling industry, just as he did the foam insulation industry, which was also stuck at the craftsman stage.

Retrofitting technology is always going to be inferior to installing it as OEM, engineered into the original equipment. That sunpump company that Freeknowledge linked to built the heat pump right into the home, and if they know what they are doing, the panel array is fabricated in a factory and installation in those homes is easy and standardized (like Dennis’s eventual Heat Injector idea). The nightmare of tinkerer installations is thereby avoided, and each home has a high-quality installation, engineered into the house. That is by far the ideal situation, not retrofitting a LamCo-style heat pump onto a home that had a gas furnace. One advantage of the LamCo retrofit was that the gas furnace could be backup, in case the heat pump failed, but they were as reliable as refrigerators, with a good pump (AKA “compressor”) lasting 20 years or so.

The air-to-air heat pumps of the day were garbage, compared to the LamCo heat pump. Yes, as the Carrier plant manager said, the air-to-air heat pumps were easy to install, like an appliance, but their design was crappy, as was their performance. The evaporator looked like a car radiator, and when the temperature got down to near freezing, ice would form on the fins, turning the evaporator into a block of ice, and no air could be forced through the fins, rendering the heat pump virtually inoperable. So, air-to-air heat pumps had heaters that de-iced the evaporators, so that air could blow through them again. Obviously, a fan and heater was going to reduce the COPs of air-to-air heat pumps.

While the LamCo heat pump did not have those problems, forced convection (via that fan) was going to improve the environmental heat exchange for air-to-air heat pumps. But those flat panels, in the sunshine and wind (which increases the heat exchange and raises the COPs), had great advantages over the tube-and fin array of air-to-air heat pumps. It used to be in Dennis’s sales materials, but it is not in my archives today, but there was an installation, someplace in the Rockies, I believe, that had a LamCo system, and it not only heated the home, but also a swimming pool, while the panels were buried under two feet of snow. A team of engineers studied that installation, wondering how the heck it did it. The conclusion was that the panels were sucking the heat out of the snow, and when the sunshine on the snow heated it up, the LamCo device sucked it back out.

I will resume my Boston posts, and I will return to the science posts as they become germane to the story. In the winter/spring of 1987, I was just learning how Dennis’s heat pump worked, and I had no idea if Dennis’s free energy idea, of hooking up his heat pump to a low-temperature heat engine, had any chance. I asked Mr. Mentor to come out to Boston to check out what we were doing. Were we chasing unicorns? When he came out in April of 1987, he was not so quick to call what we were doing “impossible,” and he eventually proposed marrying his engine to the panels from Dennis’s heat pump, but that happened later that year in Ventura. There is plenty more to the Boston story to tell.

Best,

Wade

Edited by Wade Frazier
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Hi:

Back to Boston. Those first energy shows marked the beginning of the end for me, as far as my enthusiasm went, for a few reasons. For one thing, I had pretty much laid my future on the line with Dennis, guaranteeing the investments of my first investors. I was there to help Dennis rebuild, but after the first shows, it was evident that we were not really building much. I was keenly interested in how Dennis built his companies, and I was watching the master at work, but it was a gritty business.

That salesman’s family, particularly the matriarch, fought Dennis the whole way and betrayed him in the end. They treated Dennis like some wayward salesman or entrepreneurial wild man who really did not understand. Dennis’s sales programs made it so that a chimpanzee could sell his systems, but I saw it go to his salesmen’s heads more than once, as they thought that either they were the salesmen of the century, or they harbored similar delusions. Trying to steal the business happened often, and the salesmen were regularly involved. Dennis was the magic that made it happen. That family was comprised of entrepreneurial naifs who thought that they knew better than Dennis how to make it happen. One day, they presented a partnership agreement for Dennis to sign, and as I recall, my wagon was going to get hitched to it, too, and as we read it, back in the fine print was their clause to remove Dennis from the partnership. Dennis didn’t sign it. They soon went bankrupt, fighting off all of Dennis’s attempts to bail them out.

That old girlfriend soon began attacking me, which was the most painful part of all for me, and it gave me a gentle preview of future events.

At our first greatest energy show, Dennis gave away his Heat Injector concept, which was nothing to sneeze at, but without Dennis, there was not going to be an industry of LamCo-style heat pumps. Part of me wondered what we were trying to do. Gone was Dennis’s strategy before I met him, of stacking sales contracts to the ceiling and attracting the money to build and install them. We were really showing off an idea, and a rather crude one at that, as I look back at it. We put on a second set of shows, one of which the head of the DOE in New England attended. A local newspaper covered us, and the reporter asked if he could come to work for us. It was the only time that I ever saw the mainstream media in the USA give Dennis positive coverage.

Other than the man who became our machinist in Ventura, nobody from Massachusetts got involved with us; they were all from New Hampshire or Maine. The Massachusetts media, other than that small newspaper, ignored us, as The Boston Globe ran an article on mining moon dust to solve our energy problems, soon after our first shows, and the Boston media was filled with a propaganda barrage on behalf of a nuclear power plant. Similar to Washington and Whoops, we had stumbled into the middle of a huge energy controversy. Just over the border of Massachusetts, in New Hampshire, the Seabrook Nuclear Power Plant was under construction. Federal law stated that all political jurisdictions within ten miles of a nuclear power plant had to approve the evacuation plans in case of a nuclear event. Michael Dukakis was mounting his run for the presidency that year, and he had to approve the evacuation plans for some towns in Massachusetts, and he got plenty of political mileage over opposing the plant.

There was a great deal of protest over Seabrook, which we later discovered was kind of phony, and we put on a Greatest Energy Show a quarter-mile from Seabrook’s front gates, the gates that protestors regularly chained themselves to. Our message was that the best way to fight nuclear power was to make it obsolete. It was around that time that we received what I now know was Godzilla’s first entreaty: his friendly buyout offer. The so-called White Hats were calling us in the night, and it was just before the Seabrook show that I asked Mr. Mentor to come out to Massachusetts, to see if what we were advocating had a prayer, technically. He saw our Seabrook show. Also, it turned out that several Seabrook company officials attended the show.

One member of our fledgling network was deeply connected to New England’s electric industry, and around the time of our Seabrook show, he informed us that all of New England’s electric companies held a secret meeting, to decide what to do about us. Unlike Washington’s electric companies, who opted for the snuff job, New England’s electric companies came to the conclusion that they might have to work with us. At our Seabrook show, Dennis announced his plans for buying out the Seabrook plant and instead using it for energy storage, for all of the household free energy machines that would soon carpet New England. Dennis always thought big, and he could be accused of harboring megalomaniacal dreams with nothing to back it up, and at that show, he announced that he was going make a proposal to Seabrook’s chairman of the board, to buy Seabrook out. The mouse roared. A couple of days later, Dennis express mailed his proposal to Seabrook’s chairman of the board. Talk about shooting from the hip. But guess who called our office the next day? The chairman of the board! He called and said that he could be at our hole-in-the-wall office within an hour, to discuss Dennis’s proposal. It was the opposite reaction of Washington’s electric companies.

Within a week, Dennis and Mr. Engineer had a red carpet reception at the chairman’s palatial penthouse suite in Boston, and a day or so before the meeting, I answered the phone in the office, and it was the chairman, wanting to speak to Dennis. It soon became evident that the red carpet treatment was an attempt to placate and co-opt our effort, but at least it was not a snuff job…yet.

Also, part of the seed of why I am not with Dennis today was planted in those early days in Boston. In Seattle, Dennis was just a businessman selling the world’s best heating system, putting it on customers’ homes for free, which was the most brilliant business strategy that I have ever seen. In Boston, however, Dennis’s Christian fanaticism, which was not really evident in Seattle, came to the fore, and staging our first Greatest Energy Shows at the facility where the Boston Tea Party was planned showed Dennis’s “patriotic” fervor, and I did not share his religious or “patriotic” convictions. That stuff began going against the grain for me early on. I tolerated it, but it was not my conviction. Dennis stated that The People really cared, but had nothing worth caring about, and in my naïveté, I believed him. Ten years later, when I was briefly with him again, he admitted to me that almost nobody really cared, but he was sifting through humanity’s mine tailings, looking for overlooked nuggets. He rarely found any.

It was many years before I could articulate what was troubling about Dennis’s approach. He appealed to nationalism, capitalism, and organized religion in Boston, which I later understood were the primary population management ideologies in the USA, and they work because they are based on scarcity and fear, creating an in-group at the expense of the out-group. In the end, Dennis was really appealing to people’s self-interest, under the guise of those ideologies, to get “action,” but it naturally attracted the self-interested. Some saw beyond Dennis’s rhetoric, to the great heart that Dennis had, but it was not very many. People came to our shows for the spectacle or to serve their self-interest. There were few exceptions.

Dennis wore his religion on his sleeve ever since our first Greatest Energy Shows, and that Christian, “patriotic” rhetoric attracted a certain flavor of American capitalist, and right after that Seabrook show, the epitome of that mentality arrived at our door: Amway. Mr. Stooge attended the Seabrook show and brought the first billionaire that I ever met to our office, as he sniffed around for opportunities. He was an Amway billionaire, and when we moved to Ventura a couple of months later, we stopped at Amway’s headquarters in Michigan, and had them test one of our heat pumps that had been mounted on wheels. That Seattle salesman, whose family fought Dennis the whole way, built that demo model, but in his technical ignorance, he damaged the compressor (by “liquid-charging” it, which I witnessed him do, and the heat pump only got a COP of around three during that test, when it should have gotten a nine or so (it was a sunny, 90 degree day when they tested it)). With their test of a broken unit (and who knows what else was awry with that unit?), Amway declined to get involved with us, which privately relieved Dennis, as he really did not want to become part of some conglomerate.

But what was truly momentous about those days was a secret deal that Mr. Mentor cut with Dennis, without my knowledge, and I only discovered it a decade later, while reading it in one of Dennis’s books. Dennis had been around many inventors by that time, and every inventor, and his supporters, thinks that he is the next Edison or Tesla. Free energy inventors are worse, often thinking that they are the Second Coming or Messiah, and within minutes of my arrival in Boston, I let Dennis know in no uncertain terms that Mr. Mentor’s influence was why I had chased Dennis to Boston.

Dennis had heard that story many times before, of somebody who knew a genius inventor, but as I became his partner, and he hung out with Mr. Mentor during his stay with us, Dennis realized that Mr. Mentor really was a latter-day Tesla, and he begged Mr. Mentor to get involved with him. Mr. Mentor replied that if Dennis wanted to get involved with him, that he had to move to business to Ventura, where Mr. Mentor lived, and before I knew it, Dennis began planning to move our business to Ventura, which was the last place on Earth where I wanted to be. I had left Southern California twice previously, to live in Seattle, and the second time, I vowed to never live there again. There we were moving back to my home town, little more than a year after I left LA, nearly giving it the finger in my rearview mirror as I drove away. It kind of felt like a Twilight Zone episode to me, moving back to Southern California, and I will cover that situation more later, but there are plenty more educational Boston events to tell.

Best,

Wade

Edited by Wade Frazier
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Hi:

One of my significant early lessons was in Boston, although I did not learn it more fully until years later, and it informs my efforts today. What we were doing, building a crude demo model, renting out the Old South Meeting House, with no media coverage, with Dennis in his corny white tuxedo, with only 35 people in attendance for our first show, with one patron leaving some humorous art, may have seemed to be nothing more than a con man and his gullible assistant making an inconsequential effort, ignored by the powers that be as trivial. On the surface, it may have seemed that way, but it was anything but that. All sorts of interests were avidly following our efforts.

The White Hats began to call Dennis in those days. We received Godzilla’s friendly buyout offer. The electric companies had secret meetings, to decide what to do about us. Jackie Gleason was watching our tapes. A billionaire dropped by the office, but the only official attention until then was an “investigator” who swaggered into Dennis’s office, soon after Dennis hit Boston, once the investigator was tipped off by Ms. Pinch Hitter, who lied out of both sides of her mouth as a matter of course. The only politician who contacted us was one the Kennedys, to tell Dennis that he thought that Dennis was an ***hole. That was it, from officialdom and corporate America, until we heard from the Chairman of the Seabrook Association. There was still no media coverage, other than that local newspaper, but the highest councils on Earth were paying attention, which only became more rapt in the coming years. I am on their radar today, and Dennis has been high on it since Seattle.

Dennis and I did a radio show interview just before the Seabrook show, and my naïveté showed, when Dennis said that the formal interview would never be aired and that the informal interview was the real one. He was right. In fact, I am pretty sure that the “Senator” that was on the phone with that radio personality, as we arrived for the interview, was preparing that interviewer for us. That second tape (the real interview) was certainly heard by high-ranking people, which likely included Seabrook’s chairman of the board.

Not only was that “investigator” performing an investigation in order to proceed criminally against us, although he could not find anything illegal in what we were doing, similar activities were mounted against us. Soon before we left Boston for Ventura, I opened a letter from the Massachusetts Secretary of State’s office, which gave me a preview of future events. The letter demanded the names of the people that we had done business with in Massachusetts, particularly the dealers. Dennis’s program in Boston was training salesmen/dealers, who bought the materials from us for $1,000, as I recall. Dennis was also forming a national network, which was how Mr. Professor became active with us, but more on that later.

Even I understood that it was a fishing expedition to find something that they could get us for (I was not completely naïve, having seen what I did in Seattle, and getting educated in Boston about Dennis’s past), but the only person from Massachusetts who got involved was a young man who was already planning to move to Ventura with us, and who became our machinist. I replied with his name, and we moved away a week or two later, escaping their clutches. The red carpet from Seabrook’s chairman of the board was about to turn redder with our blood if we had stayed much longer.

I witnessed the carnage at the tail-end of Dennis’s Seattle effort, saw lives wrecked, heard about that “suicide,” and starved for months myself. I got another dose of it in Boston, and it was one of the saddest aspects of my journey and is a big reason why I am taking my approach today. We never really got anything going in Boston, at least not after I became Dennis’s partner. There were some enthusiastic people, such as that man who arranged that radio show interview that never aired. He and his father got involved, and were some of our most enthusiastic supporters in those early days, but soon before we left, I called him. It was a painful conversation, as he told me about how all of his efforts came to naught, which comprised a few months of his life and probably a few thousand dollars spent. It was trivial, compared to what I had already been through, not to mention Dennis’s preposterous journey, but we had a responsibility for “infecting” that man with our free energy dream, and he went out and tried to stir things up, to only run into the brick wall of humanity’s inertia. He was an early example of what I caution people about today, of proselytizing to their social circles. It is a good way to get ostracized.

Just like I had no idea what I was getting into when that voice spoke to me, when I left Seattle to chase after Dennis, when I became his partner, and when we moved the operation to Ventura, the people who got involved with us really had no idea what they were getting involved with. It seemed unfair to me, even though we never hid our past. Joe Average had almost no framework to understand the lay of the land, what free energy really meant, what the obstacles were, how the world really worked, and so on. We barely understood ourselves, in those days. Dennis does not really understand free energy’s Epochal significance, all these years later, partly because of his scientific illiteracy and partly because Indiana Jones rarely slows down long enough to think deeply about the journey; he is too busy trying to survive his adventures, and Dennis watches TV in his “spare” time, not in study. In Boston, I began having serious reservations about the populist route that Dennis was trying. When I chased Dennis from Seattle, my goal was to help Dennis stack contracts and sell equipment again. Free energy was the furthest thing from my mind when I left Seattle for Boston, and some mass movement, selling business opportunities (which I eventually learned that only Dennis was capable of truly exploiting), chasing after an idea, was not really what I signed up for.

While I was on that 45-day fast and for the last few months in Seattle, when I lived with my grandparents, I probably did not drink alcohol at all. I could not afford it, for one thing ( :) ), but after our first Greatest Energy Shows and as the attacks from that old girlfriend began, my drinking problem returned with a vengeance, and I was soon picking up a six-pack of beer on the way home from work and drinking it alone in my room at our house. Dennis drank wine, and during those long nights that winter/spring of 1987, with Dennis telling me his life’s story and beginning to train me to become his protégé, it was often accompanied by my drinking beer and Dennis’s drinking wine. In his frustration after one of our shows, Dennis drunkenly hurled a dinner knife through the first pane of a double-paned window in our kitchen, and it was still trapped between the panes when we moved away a few months later.

The early excitement had turned to sadness and stress for me, and by the time we left Boston, my stress symptoms from my LA days came back in full blossom. I was drinking heavily again, and I really did not know why we were moving back to California, which was the last place on Earth where I wanted to be.

I am coming to the end of the Boston posts, but there are still some tales to tell and I’ll summarize the lessons that I learned in Boston.

Best,

Wade

Edited by Wade Frazier
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Hi:

The two most common reactions to our Boston efforts were:

  • “This is a scam!”
  • “They are going to kill you!”



I have mentioned the enlightening conversations that I had when answering the company’s phone, beginning in Seattle when I talked to John Spickard for the only time. One day in Boston, I picked up the phone to hear a woman nearly yell, “Come on! This is a scam!” After a minute of conversation, when I replied that we were sincere in our efforts, she said, “In that case, I am calling to offer you our marketing services.” That is how they make sales calls in Boston. :)

When my old girlfriend attacked me for the last time, I sent her a check that was for twice her initial investment, along with a note in which I observed how offensive her attacks were, and I never heard from her again. I think that Dennis had already met Mr. Professor and Mr. Mentor by that time, as he and Mr. Engineer took a trip to California to meet with the first of several scientists that we encountered who challenged the validity of the second law of thermodynamics, or at least its mainstream interpretation. Dennis had begun a national regional concept, and Mr. Professor was busily raising money for his region, after his Merry Christmas gesture ended up with my giving him stock in my company.

When I paid that old girlfriend, Dennis insisted that I make my guarantee to my investors good then, so that they would not have a claim on me later, and the offer was this: twice their money back for their investment, or all of their money back for half of their investment, and I would no longer guarantee anybody’s investment. Mr. Professor was eager to buy out anybody and everybody, and one of my investors took me up on it. Another investor (the friend that accompanied me on this backpack) was allied with my old girlfriend during her attacks, and her last call to me was from his home. I had called him, she happened to be there, and he put her on the phone. She proceeded to attack me like a bulldog, which left me in tears. It was her fourth and final attacking phone call. I nearly begged him to sell his stock, or at least half of it for all of his money back, but he said that he was fine. It was a lie, as I later discovered, at about the worst possible moment.

Mr. Professor was so eager, and was raising money, that I thought that he was why we moved to Ventura. I had no idea that it was because of the secret deal that Mr. Mentor made with Dennis. When we hit Ventura a couple of months later, Mr. Professor gave Dennis a wad of money (about what I raised to become Dennis’s partner) and told him to go make it happen. Mr. Professor and I were the only partners that Dennis ever had who trusted him like that, and Dennis asked me if I had any more buddies like that. :)

As we began to prepare for our move to California, we hired a man to run our Boston operation, which was dying fast. He was the first person that I encountered who tried to steal a company that I owned a piece of. He was far from the last. :)

Dennis’s father was dying of rheumatoid arthritis at that time. Dennis took a trip to Yakima to visit and came back with a salesman named Fred, whom Dennis knew from this youth. Fred ran the Boston operation for a month or so after we left, BS-ing everybody, spending the last money of our Boston operation, and then driving away with a car that that Boston family had leased. Back home in Yakima, he did not respond to our calls and letters, and Dennis convinced his sister to go “steal” it from Fred’s home. I flew up to Seattle to drive it back down to Ventura, and we flew that Seattle salesman from Boston to drive it back home. As I picked up the car, Dennis’s sister told me that she would not do anything like that for Dennis again. It was like me making a threat on Dennis’s behalf: once was enough. A few weeks later, Dennis hired Fred again and brought him to Ventura, to run the sales team. It was strange to me. I think that Dennis stayed friends with Fred through all that was about to happen. Fred was a good BS-er, I’ll give him that, but as I recall, he was not much help to our Ventura operation. I think that Dennis had a youthful respect for Fred’s sales ability, but Fred’s game only worked in small-town Yakima, it seemed to me.

I am going to be quiet for a couple of days.

Best,

Wade

Edited by Wade Frazier
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In June 1987, five months after I became Dennis’s partner, we loaded a rental truck with most of the company’s assets, towed my Pinto wagon behind it, and headed toward California. Dennis, Mr. Engineer, that Seattle salesman and I drove to Amway’s headquarters in Michigan, where they tested what turned out to be a broken system, and I drove by myself the rest of the way to Ventura. Dennis visited his dying father one last time, I lived with my father, whose wife kicked me out of the home a month later (and I moved in with Dennis and his family once more), and Mr. Professor had raised enough money for us to get going again. Get going on what was a good question, and that will come in future posts, but I want to summarize what I learned in Boston, which is the point of my recent posts.

I did it in that letter to Brian O that became an essay, and as I look at those Boston lessons, I probably can’t improve on its gist much, but I can put a little more meat on the bones.

That “hacking at branches” observation largely related to those Seabrook protestors who chained themselves to the front gates, but making nuclear power obsolete was off of their radar.

Having the red carpet rolled out by Seabrook’s chairman, while others were sharpening their axes, became a common dynamic, which we eventually saw with the White House several times. That the sitting American president and his advisors were either fans of Dennis’s, or he had their great respect, meant nothing in the big picture. The sitting American president is little more than a puppet, and he knows it.

While I learned many important lessons in Boston, or began to learn them (the lessons often did not really drive home until years later, sometimes many years, as I put events and evidence together), the most painful, by far, was seeing how those closest to me could act despicably, and that old girlfriend’s attacks comprised a gentle preview of what was ahead for me. That, more than anything else, left me feeling pretty battered by June 1987. Facing the idea of a violent death was not as painful as being attacked that way, by somebody whom I once considered marrying.

Those days also began my period of disillusionment with our effort. We did not stack contracts up, like Dennis had done in the past, but began some kind of social effort, founded on Dennis’s belief that The People cared, but had nothing worth caring about (a decade later, he admitted that he was wrong). I had been getting slowly disillusioned since I left home for the university, but that process kicked into high gear in Boston. Mr. Mentor said early on that the USA was too fascist for our effort to succeed, and he was right. But it was really how The People acted that shocked me, not what the Big Boys did. Dennis called them the Big Boys early on, and I used it myself. Somebody once suggested that the “Big Boys” was too glib, so I invented “Global Controllers,” but I usually use the more colorful “Godzilla” that I heard Steven Greer use, especially in relatively informal forum posts. However, the name is not important (they don’t have an official name, as far as I know). It is what they do that is, and I later realized that we received Godzilla’s friendly buyout offer in Boston, around the same time that the White Hats began contacting Dennis.

I began to learn that the free energy pursuit is life-risking and life-wrecking behavior, in many ways. Those are probably the most important lessons of my journey, and the heart of what I have to offer: I know what doesn’t work and is unlikely to, and it richly informs my current effort. I don’t want to bury anybody else whom I got involved in my efforts, and it is a big reason why I am being very picky on who can join my effort.

But even as I drove to Ventura in June of 1987, if you had told me what the next two years would have in store for me, I would have looked at you like you were crazy. My learning experiences were just beginning.

Best,

Wade

Edited by Wade Frazier
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On to the Ventura experience. Long ago, Alison told me that what she really learned, from all of those years of playing Dennis’s chief spear carrier, were the lessons about humanity. We are all the Universal People, all behaviorally modern, and when I saw Dennis and Alison three years ago, I asked, and they replied, that people are the same everywhere. That was the expected answer, and much of what I learned over the years has been about the human animal, too.

As each Epoch became increasingly humane, human nature did not change at all after people became behaviorally modern. Whether a person is a hunter-gatherer, farmer, factory worker, or the world’s richest human, people today have the same human nature as those in the founder group that left Africa long ago. In a world of fear and scarcity, very few people are able or willing to see beyond their immediate self-interest, and they project their motivation onto everybody they meet. My fellow travelers were a bunch of freaks, overgrown Boy Scouts in a world full of egocentric dishonorableness, and they were all guilty of projecting their motivation onto others, too, which set them up for painful lessons, but which could ultimately be enlightening.

In Moral Origins, the author noted that people are primarily egocentric, looking out for Number One, and once their immediate needs were taken care of, they could be “nepotistic,” which meant that they could concern themselves with the welfare of their families. After that, they could be “altruistic,” which meant looking out for the welfare of those who were not family members (generally at the band level, but those in other bands were fair game). But when times became really tough, killing and eating one’s children became acceptable behavior.

Moral Origins’ author also noted that in times of plenty, the carefully developed meat-sharing rituals of hunter-gatherer bands fell apart, as they were unnecessary when everybody had plenty. They only reappeared when a more normal meat supply prevailed, and when times got tough, it became every family for itself as bands disintegrated. It could eventually get to where families literally cannibalized each other.

I have had the blessing or misfortune, depending on how one looks at it, of deeply studying the Holocaust of World War II, and still the most haunting survivor testimony for me was of a Bergen Belsen inmate who encountered an inmate from Auschwitz, who was disgusted by the musselmen lying around Bergen-Belsen. That Bergen-Belsen inmate was ashamed for his camp and envied the cleanly efficiency of Auschwitz. In Bergen-Belsen, cannibalism was frowned on, as the inmates still tried to maintain a standard of decency in that living hell.

When studying the Holocaust or “settling” North America by Anglo-Americans, a typical mentality is blaming their victims, usually by making them subhuman. I see it today, with Americans blaming the peoples of the Middle East for their state, as the West has conquered and subjugated them for more than a century, solely because they are sitting on all of that oil. These are universal human “values,” of treating out-groups terribly and self-righteously justifying it. America’s behavior is like that Milton quote of poking out somebody’s eyes and then reproaching them for their blindness.

That is just the human animal. It is who we are, and it does no good to judge the situation. But it is suicidally foolish to pretend that people are different in their natures. In a world of scarcity and fear, that is what we get, even in history’s richest and most powerful nation. Increase humanity’s energy surplus by a few orders of magnitude, so that scarcity becomes only a dim memory, and human societies will radically transform, and perhaps eventually even human nature, but not until then. That is what an Epochal perspective is like, and is what I am trying to help my readers develop. A prominent theme of Moral Origins is that while human nature may not have changed much, if any, since humans became behaviorally modern, societies likely have been culling psychopathic genes from humanity’s genome, as psychopaths eventually “get theirs,” and hunter-gatherer bands usually banished or executed those who could not control their psychopathic behavior. Of course, Godzilla is the apotheosis of psychopathic behavior, as he refined his game to a science, as he represents capitalism on steroids.

If I approached that old girlfriend today, she almost certainly would consider me to be a criminal that she got the better of, in her cleverness. Her ego cannot allow her to do anything else. She would likely regard doubling her investment after several weeks of attacks to be just her shrewd success of navigating in a world full of criminals.

My immediate family disowned me, even though I saved all of their lives, and their disowning me was largely because I saved their lives, often at great personal cost to me. To one degree or another, I was on the receiving end of their attacks as they disowned me. The human conscience, or lack thereof, is a very curious phenomenon. To this day, not even one of them ever acknowledged that they did anything awry, and if I ever contacted any of them again, they would go to great lengths to justify, at least in their minds, what they did, to put themselves on some sort of illusory higher moral plane than me. I am not going to subject them or me to that situation. It is better to leave it alone. They can go to their graves clinging to their self-righteous justifications. Only after they pass will they begin to wake up. It is the human way.

Those people would likely attack me again if given a chance, partly to justify their prior behavior. One of them would still attack me to this day if he could. I had to threaten to make him “famous,” as I would expose his crimes to the world (I have saved the evidence), if he did not back off (he is too in thrall to his ego to be aware of his peril, as he would be easy meat for people like Bill the BPA Hit Man, Mr. Skeptic, Mr. Texas, etc.). I forgave them, but they can’t forgive themselves, and will not begin to become conscious of their actions until they are in their life review.

The dishonorable and criminal actions that I saw in Seattle were eye-opening, but were performed by people that I did not know. That year was the beginning of my awakening process, but it was not until I got my family and friends involved, and began to receive dishonorable and even criminal attacks, that I finally learned the primary lesson of my journey: personal integrity is the world’s scarcest commodity. I resisted that lesson every step of the way, until I had it beaten into my head in no uncertain terms. The harsh parts of that lesson were still ahead of me as I rolled into Ventura in late-June of 1987.

My pupils almost always go out and proselytize the Gospel of Free Energy and Abundance to their social circles, and come back to me sobered, virtually always with tales of ostracism. I then ask if they are ready to lay aside their misconceptions and be willing to learn. It is egocentric to think that their social circles will be different, comprised of people with the right stuff. My best pupils always do that. Heck, I did it too, and far more. But if we are not too stuck on our egocentric misconceptions, it is possible to learn how the world really works, not the fantasy version. Much of my work is about helping people lay aside the egocentric conceits of the in-group ideologies that they were raised with. Only when they can get past those barriers to comprehension can they begin to understand what abundance really means and how the world really works.

I am going to write about the Ventura events in a way that I have not really done before, and certainly not under one roof like this string of posts will be.

Best,

Wade

Edited by Wade Frazier
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When I hit Ventura, my father and I moved the truck’s contents into storage, and I waited for Dennis to arrive, who was saying goodbye to his dying father, who passed a few weeks later. I really have to rack my memory on Mr. Professor in those early days in Ventura. I had not seen him since 1982, just before I moved to LA, when he told me about A.L. Williams, and buying their stock made him a millionaire. Ironically, I worked on the A.L Williams engagement as I began my career in LA. A.L. Williams took on a corrupt industry and won, and by then, Mr. Professor knew enough about Dennis’s story to see the parallels with A.L. Williams’s. Mr. Professor was my best teacher ever, and I was one of his best students ever, but you would not have described us as close in those days. I visited him in his home before I moved to L.A., and his Merry Christmas gift showed who he was, but that was the extent of our contact until then.

Like me, Mr. Professor had no idea what was coming. I was young enough to survive what was coming, but the coming years ruined his life and led to his early death. He amassed his Saint Points in those years, but what a heavy price to pay. Mr. Professor had raised money from investors, and when Dennis hit town a couple of weeks after I did, Mr. Professor handed Dennis the money and told him to go make it happen. Mr. Professor and I were the only two investors that Dennis ever had who did that. When Mr. Professor died, he still planned to take care of those investors, and get their money back to them somehow. His widow has that list, and I will likely take custody of it one day, keeping track of it, and maybe one day….

When Dennis arrived in town, the first thing that he did was run “free electricity” ads in the LA Times, looking for salesmen. Mr. Professor taught college by day, and had an accounting practice on the side. He worked 70 hour weeks during the tax season, between college and his practice. Dennis and I worked out of Mr. Professor’s office in those first weeks, in July 1987. It was in that office that I think that I heard of the fate of the company that stole Mr. Mentor’s engine in the 1970s. Even if they were the people who stole it, I did not cheer the fate of people kangarooed into prison, and it gave me a preview of what was coming.

We soon rented an office building, with warehouse space in the back. That space became our R&D facility. Dennis tried something new in Ventura, in late July. He ran ads in USA Today, with the headline “free electricity,” and offered to sell kits on building, selling, and installing his heat pump. It was $2,000 per kit, or $5,000 for all three. Soon, checks began coming in from all over the USA. By that time, I was living with Dennis and his family again, as I got booted out of the house I was raised in by my father’s wife, and I never lived with family again, other than when I took in my brothers over the succeeding years.

Dennis soon got deathly ill, and I may have healed him. As he recovered, he told Alison and me that those checks coming in from across the USA comprised the next gold mine. He literally made a gesture like a water dowser, telling us that he found the next gusher. All I had seen was bloody ruin until that time, and I really did not understand, and neither did Alison, but Dennis was the master. I was still recovering from the Boston experience, and really was not ready for what was coming, but here it came.

One thing that I have seen a great deal of over the years was people’s instant armchair criticism of Dennis’s efforts. His assailants and critics invariably tell Big Lies about Dennis (1, 2, 3, 4), and I have watched the naïve and gullible swallow the lies whole for many years, as I recently witnessed here. The lies never go away, as people endlessly parrot them. It is the way of humanity these days, as the conversation rarely rises above lies and gossip.

Again, I wanted to stack contracts and build systems, like Dennis did in Seattle. But instead, we were selling business opportunities. I still wonder what Dennis was really thinking in those days. With the tax credit expired, the best market for his heat pump would be commercial hot water applications, in which they needed all the hot water that Dennis’s systems could give them. You really wanted a system that worked 24 hours a day (or perhaps only in the daytime, when the COPs were higher), and commercial applications were the best use of that equipment.

I think that what Dennis envisioned was his developing a national sales program, through dealers, and probably targeting the commercial market, and performing the R&D on free energy technology in the meantime. Dennis was also keenly aware of how the markets are rigged. The Seattle experience removed all doubt about that, and I think that his strategy was to get big enough, fast enough, to where they would have a hard time bringing down the sledgehammer on us, and his regional concept was to decentralize the operation, so that it would not be vulnerable. Dennis was also operating from that The People really care delusion, and figured that he would attain some kind of folk hero status (which he eventually did), and the public support would see that his effort was not bludgeoned as it was in Seattle. It did not work, in the end, but Dennis gave it the college try and then some, as usual.

One Big Lie that I have heard told about Dennis since the Seattle days was how he got rich fleecing the flock. Bigger lies have seldom been told. Dennis eventually lost all of his teeth on his journey, and his clothes, furniture, and household appliances came from thrift stores, and his cars came from police auctions and the like. When we moved into a house in Ventura, we bought a washer and dryer from the thrift store. The washing machine did not work, neither did the dryer, as we were hoodwinked by the thrift store, and I asked Mr. Mentor to come over and help us with the washer, as he had long since retired and become a handy man, and even taught an appliance repair course at the same college that Mr. Professor taught at. He and Dennis chatted a little that day, but I had no idea of the undercurrents of that conversation.

Again, I had no idea of the secret deal that he and Dennis had struck in Boston, which was why we were in Ventura in the first place. As the rocket ship began taking off in Ventura, Mr. Mentor did not seem interested in being involved. His influence was why I was doing what I was, and that voice in my head led me to both Mr. Professor and Dennis, and rehabilitating him was near the top of my list of priorities, but he was very standoffish. I accepted it and never asked him why. Years later, when I learned that he was the reason why we were in Ventura, and that he blamed me for what happened there, I got pretty angry, but at that time, he did not seem interested in getting involved, and I left it at that. The rocket ship began to take off in late August 1987, and I was back to working 60-70 hour weeks, and really did not have time to worry much about Mr. Mentor.

Mr. Engineer came back down from Ellensburg, as we got rolling in Ventura, and he and Mr. Mentor hit it off like two old engineers. In September, Dennis was visiting another scientist in LA, and brought Mr. Engineer along, who also invited Mr. Mentor along. I was busy running the exploding business with Alison, and was barely even aware of their trip to LA, and I am not sure that I even knew that Mr. Mentor was with them.

As I heard it later, Mr. Mentor was very gun-shy, as all of his inventions were either stolen or suppressed, and he heard a rumor that Dennis did not treat Mr. Inventor very well. Mr. Engineer set Mr. Mentor straight about that, and the next thing I knew, Mr. Mentor not only came aboard, but proposed that his hydraulic heat engine, combined with the panels of Dennis’s heat pump, might be able to do the free energy that Dennis was questing after. The next thing I knew, we bought a machine shop, put it in that warehouse behind our office, and that kid from Boston who became our machinist began building the first prototype of what Mr. Mentor called a geophysical heat pump.

I did not get involved on the technical side at all, just trying to hang onto the rocket ship that was taking off. In a couple of months, we went from that handful of people to 40 employees. I did not witness the rocket ship take off in Seattle, but I lived through it in Ventura. That was an incredible experience.

Best,

Wade

Edited by Wade Frazier
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Hi:

The four months that ended 1987 was the rocket ship that I had heard about with Dennis. I wasn’t really ready for it, but I had to try to hang on. It was like holding onto a rope tied to a rocket that was taking off. In the 35 years since I graduated from business school, that was the craziest business experience that I ever had, and I have been in some high-flying situations, such as in high-tech, on the leading edge of the mobile revolution.

We went from a few volunteers to 40 employees in a couple of months, and we were so buried in kit orders that it took more than a month to fill an order. We had to rent a second building, in the same complex as the first. We were busily building a prototype of Mr. Mentor’s geophysical heat pump, Dennis held Saturday morning shows at our facility (the Christian Dennis and Alison always tried to take Sundays off), our company became a short-lived Mecca for people from around the world to visit, and some of their tales will come soon.

In the year-and-a-half since I met Dennis, all that I had seen was bloody ruin, with a brief interlude of auspiciousness when I became Dennis’s partner. All that I spent money on was food and gasoline (the energy bare minimum) during the previous year, when I was not fasting because it was cheaper than eating. I had survived on about $50 per week (less than 10% of what I could earn as an accountant in those days), living with Dennis’s family and living with my grandparents. Since I left home, I never had roommates who were fastidious housekeepers, and it eventually became frustrating when I had to clean the kitchen before I could use it, and I mean clean it, with a mound of dirty dishes in the sink and sometimes having to clean up outright filth. Living with Dennis and his family was one of my life’s highlights, but housekeeping was not at the top of their list of priorities, understandably, and when the money finally began to roll in, I asked Dennis if I could spend a few hundred dollars a month and rent a room in Ventura. He heartily agreed, and I looked for a room. I only made a couple of calls in response to ads, and went to a house that was only a couple of blocks from my first girlfriend’s home, my first real jobs before leaving home (three of them), and the local college where Mr. Professor taught. I could literally make a walk to all of them in one 15-minute circuit (several miles from the house that I grew up in), and I sometimes think about that.

The events of my life have been so spectacular that I long ago resigned myself to the idea that I have been on special assignment, and Dennis much more so. Brian O also was, as was Mr. Professor. Our journeys were so much larger than life that being asked/ordered to go to Mars was only an amusing footnote. I can look back and see the possible mating agreements strewn in my path, sometimes hitting me over the head, sometimes turning out very badly, and I could tell, sometimes as it happened, that my “friends” were messing with me, and I can tell that they still do it and are not finished with me. That is a very mixed blessing, let me tell you. When you ask for guidance and it comes (1, 2), the depth of your commitment will equal the “quality” of the guidance. I only asked for guidance twice, and don’t plan to do it again. That voice has plenty of explaining to do before I ever plan to ask for its input again, and the voice never does, as it plays its cryptic games. But being “messed with” by my “friends” was not all bad, not by any means, and most of what they threw in my path were tests, such as rescuing that hooker.

When I arrived and the woman who owned the house opened the door, I did something that I had never done before in my life, and I doubt that I have since. I said that I recognized her, and that our paths must have crossed before. I racked my brain for how I had met her, and almost immediately notice a physical attribute that I would have recalled, and said, in my nerdishness, that I would have remembered that, so I must not have met her before. That woman is my wife today, and my sun rises and sets on her. That moment was obviously past-life recognition, and was really the beginning of the end of my days with Dennis, although I did not know it yet, nor did I know that I was staring at my future on that doorstep. It was October 1987, and I was working 12-to-14 hour days to stay on Dennis’s rocket. I immediately walked into the house, opened the refrigerator and looked in the sink, and they met my housekeeping standards. That nerdish behavior impressed my future landlord, and I moved in a few days later.

So, chalk one up for my “friends,” and I consider my wife to be one of the compensations for my journey, and being married and running a household has helped ground me on my journey, which I have needed, believe me. Even with all of my FE activism, making good money and enjoying the outdoors, my life would be an empty thing without my marriage.

Best,

Wade

Edited by Wade Frazier
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Hi:

This is a good point to discuss some of the physics of Mr. Mentor’s engine and how he thought that it might be able to produce free energy. The Carnot ideal has been thrown around a lot in my free energy discussion, but it rarely comes up in the real world. About half of Carnot has been about the best that standard configurations have produced, so the Carnot limit has never been a practical limit, because nothing ever came close to it.

When Mr. Mentor invented his engine in a flash, he was not thinking of Carnot at all, especially thinking in terms of “beating” the Carnot ideal. He was just thinking of what the ideal engine for powering a car might look like. When the federal government brought in that rocket scientist to assess it (partly why you see NASA mentioned in that article), only then did thermodynamics really come into it.

If you ponder how it worked, compared to thermodynamic theory, an external combustion hydraulic heat engine could not get temperatures over about 700 degrees F, as water’s critical temperature (the temperature at which it will become a gas, no matter how much pressure is applied to it) limited the high end. That is far cooler than today’s Otto cycle engines, as the temperatures inside the combustion chambers get over 3,000 degrees F (which is why nitrogen oxides are automobile pollutants). The rule for any heat engine is that the hotter it runs, the more efficiently it runs (run the Carnot numbers, and that becomes obvious – at 2,000 degrees F and a 70 degree F exhaust heat sink, the Carnot ideal is 78%, and at 700 degrees F, it is 54%, but the flame’s temperature would be the high-end sink, I believe), so a cooler-running engine would not produce the nitrogen oxide pollutants, but would also not be as efficient. The early work on Mr. Mentor’s engine suggested something besides water as the working fluid, such as DOWTHERM A, which might get better performance.

Similarly, when heat pumps are discussed, Carnot never comes into it, as it is some lofty ideal that heat pumps never approached (Dennis’s got nearly 60% of Carnot, which is by far the highest ever achieved), and the technical jargon around heat engines and heat pumps does not mention Carnot, but deals with various temperatures and pressures, heat pumps were rated with SEER ratings, not COPs, and so on.

So, Carnot in the real world is seen as some pointy-headed ideal that physicists might invoke, but the engineers who actually design and build heat engines and heat pumps do not use Carnot. They are aware of the Carnot limits, but they do not come into practical application.

But Mr. Mentor, and later, Victor Fischer, thought that their hydraulic heat engines, combined with the panels from Dennis’s heat pump, could produce free energy (“FE”). Carnot said no. Very ironically, in the libelous essay written about FE and Dennis, the scientist specifically mentioned farming environmental heat to do FE, and took pains to state that he was not writing about Dennis (he libeled Dennis later in the essay, which made that early mention of Dennis understandable). Eugene Mallove advocated the same thing. When Brian introduced me to Mallove in late 2003, Gene stated that he was able to reproduce Reich’s “impossible” data with a Faraday cage, and that the so-called second law of thermodynamics was invalid, which is a bold claim, to be sure. Mallove was murdered before we could discuss it further.

If you study Sparky Sweet’s paper (with Bearden’s below it), what makes Sparky’s device so unusual is that it is not grounded, as orthodox circuitry requires. When Sparky demonstrated his gizmo to Mr. Advisor, when he put the wiring together so that it went into overdrive, conventional circuitry theory stated that it should have shorted out, but that was what sent it into overdrive. I’ll never forget the awe in Mr. Advisor’s voice as he described Sparky’s device going into overdrive as ice formed on it. Mr. Advisor was a world-class talent in the properties of electricity. It reminds me of how microbiologists have their minds boggled when looking through Naessens’s scope.

If you think about Mr. Mentor’s engine, or Fischer’s, they do not exhaust to a low-temperature heat sink. That was the part that always boggled my mind when thinking of Mr. Mentor’s engine and his thoughts about FE. It was similar to Sparky’s gizmo, in that it defied conventional notions. All heat engines are supposed to exhaust to a low-temperature heat sink, even the external combustion engines, but Mr. Mentor’s didn’t.

I am not a credentialed scientist, and I am sure not going to produce some fully elucidated theory for why Mr. Mentor’s engine might be able to defy the Carnot limits, but it is the only heat engine that I know of that didn’t exhaust to a low-temperature heat sink.

Again, Mr. Mentor did not invent his engine thinking about the Carnot limit, but he later advocated his geophysical heat pump idea, which conventional physics says is “impossible.” Well, we never got a chance to find out. We got wiped out first, and when Fischer came along, we abandoned Mr. Mentor’s prototype and began building a Fischer engine, sized for the home (the first Fischer prototypes were as big as a car). Mr. Mentor eventually gave his geophysical heat pump idea to Dennis, which again showed that he was the closest thing to an altruistic inventor that I ever met, and because he was the first, I had a delusion about inventors that I did not completely shed until my second stint with Dennis in 1996-1997.

Inventors invent to get rich and famous, not to help the world, and FE inventors are regularly overcome with delusions of grandeur, announcing themselves to be the Second Coming or Messiah. Greed regularly overcomes inventors and their associates, especially when pursuing FE. The efforts usually self-destruct before Godzilla needs to lift a claw.

Best,

Wade

Edited by Wade Frazier
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