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Lessons learned from my journey with Dennis


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Hi:

From the very beginning of my days with Dennis in Seattle, when I saw the lying TV news clip, when my boss helped steal the company while the employees cheered, when I saw the loyalists turn out to be not so loyal, it was always more “interesting” to see how people helped wreck the effort who were not in on it, like how Bill the BPA Hit Man was, how Betsy was, how Ken Hodgell was, how Mr. Deputy was, and probably how Mr. Skeptic was.

Psychopaths are pretty easy to understand, although their victims often refuse to believe it, until the dagger goes in their chests or backs. The psychopaths are guns for hire and will even kill family members, for the right price.

What was more “interesting” was the behavior of the “loyalists,” Ms. Pinch Hitter, Mr. Investigator, those cheering employees, Mr. Engineer and Mr. Researcher, my friends and family, including that attacking girlfriend and my mother, as they were not given big enticements to attack or betray us, many of them had a very good idea who they were betraying and attacking, and many had at least some dim understanding of the stakes of the game. While nobody can really live inside the head of another, it can be highly educational to see people operate when the carrots and sticks of organized suppression are brandished, and how almost nobody could resist them for even seconds. Those behaviors are what drove home my life’s more important lesson – personal integrity is the world’s commodity – not the behavior of Godzilla’s minions, who sold their souls long ago.

Watching Dennis evolve from “the people really care” to “almost nobody cares” to “my allies hurt me more than my enemies” was an education in of itself.

When Mr. Investigator entered the scene, while Mr. Deputy was hiding in his house, his involvement really was one of the most educational aspects of my journey. I had been radicalized by the end of 1988, and my paradigm was largely set by then, but I had more to learn, kind of like understanding the textures of the paradigm, not so much its basic structure. About a third of all men become sadists if given the opportunity, which harkens way back in the human journey, at least back to chimps. Mr. Investigator’s tale is next.

Best,

Wade

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Hi:

As I segue to Mr. Investigator’s entrance onto the scene, one incident bears repeating. In the Seattle days, Dennis’s manufacturer, Bestec, was wiped out by the Rockefellers, which forced Dennis into building his own factory. When Dennis was in jail, Bestec’s president helped us. He gets big points for that. Before Dennis escaped jail, Bestec’s president contacted a lab that tested Bestec’s heat pump. He asked for a certified copy of the test that he had ordered years ago, so that we could introduce it into evidence.

The prosecution’s “expert” witness, who had never actually seen Dennis’s heat pump operating, announced in court that Dennis’s heat pump could never attain more than a COP of seven, and declared it “impossible.” That lab test recorded a COP of more than seven. Soon after Dennis escaped from jail, that lab replied with a very strange letter to Bestec’s president, stating that they would not produce that test unless they received a letter that stated that Bestec never had any business relationship with Dennis and that the heat pump that Dennis promoted was not the one that they tested. It was bizarre, until Bestec’s president subpoenaed the lab and they offered to settle the matter by providing the letter that one of Mr. Deputy’s minions had sent them. The minion’s letter stated that Dennis was using that lab’s good name to defraud the public, and that what he was selling had no relationship to the heat pump that they tested. That was in the Big Lie category, as usual. We will never know how deeply all of that evil went.

When Mr. Deputy hid in his house to avoid the hot seat, heroic protector of the public that he was, Mr. Investigator became the prosecution’s star “investigator.” If you get The Alternative, you will see that I was put in quite a vice in Ventura, the kind that I would not wish on anybody. Mr. Researcher came out of hiding after a few months, when Dennis was still in jail, and a year later, during the misconduct hearing, Dennis subpoenaed Mr. Researcher (it was a fake subpoena, but that is another story). Because Mr. Deputy was hiding in his home by that time, Mr. Researcher gathered the courage to testify at the misconduct hearing, and I reproduce some of it from Mr. Big Time Attorney’s lawsuit that he filed soon afterward. But before he testified, he was interrogated by the prosecution. I heard that tape, too, and it was not the cowardly performance that he made in front of Mr. Deputy nearly two years earlier, and he earned a few points back by testifying at the misconduct hearing, and he also got some points for making public what he and Mr. Investigator talked about in those days, which was enlightening.

During a break in the interrogation, Mr. Researcher asked Mr. Investigator if he ever thought that Dennis might just be innocent, and Mr. Investigator made his memorable reply, “I don’t care if he is innocent. I am paid to get convictions.” In the same conversation, Mr. Researcher observed that the prosecution’s case seemed to be built on lies and BS, and Mr. Investigator replied, “Sure we lie, and I will do however much lying that I need to in order to secure that conviction.” He was voicing sentiments probably held by the vast majority of prosecutors in the USA, but only in Ventura could they be heard admitting it. Mr. Researcher subsequently got out of jury duty more than once by repeating Mr. Investigator’s words to the judge, and once Ms. Prosecutor was the presiding judge, who immediately called a recess when his name was called, and she took him back into her chambers and quizzed him about Dennis for an hour before dismissing him from jury duty.

Mr. Investigator’s frank admission is what Noam Chomsky and friends would call the structural constraints on the system, which guarantee its evil outcomes. The system is designed to produce such evil outcomes, and with humanity’s personal integrity so low to begin with, a system that only rewards convictions (instead of a quest for justice, for instance – what a concept! :) ) will produce people such as Mr. Investigator, who eagerly pursue such careers. Mr. Investigator would have been right at home slaughtering Jews in the Holocaust, as would Mr. Deputy have been, and they would likely have been among the gleeful executioners. This is who we are, my fellow humans, as far too many of us eagerly serve evil, for the right price, or kneel to it. That is why we don’t receive the benefits of free energy and other exotic technologies today, from Godzilla to Bill the BPA Hit Man to Ken Hodgell to Mr. Deputy to Mr. Cub Reporter to Mr. Skeptic to Mr. Engineer to Mr. Researcher to those employees who cheered as Dennis had his company stolen to talking heads in the FE field who only know how to lie about Dennis to my own mother, who made a scrapbook of all of those libelous articles and took it on a tour to my friends, family, and investors, telling them the story of her son the criminal.

I certainly have not given up, but I know what I am working with, and know all too well how worthless mass movements will be for this, and much more is coming on that topic before these posts are finished.

Best,

Wade

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Hi:

There are several important anecdotes about Mr. Investigator’s behavior to relate. Mr. Big Time Attorney lived in San Diego, and he and his paralegal had to drive four hours, through Los Angeles (which was no fun at all), in order to attend the hearings. Several times during the misconduct hearings, Mr. Big Time Attorney drove up from San Diego to Ventura, to have Mr. Deputy get on the hot seat, to only be informed that Mr. Deputy was “too ill” to testify. In a phone call to Mr. Researcher, Mr. Investigator outright admitted that it was a stalling tactic, partly intended to drain Dennis’s legal fund. In The Alternative, exhibit 5E, Mr. Researcher reported Mr. Investigator’s words:


“The defense must be out a lot of money with all the delays. Lawyers coming all the way from San Diego cost a lot of money. Where are they getting the money to do this? What is Dennis going to do when his money runs out?”


As I have stated before, you get just as much justice in the USA as you can afford, which Mr. Investigator gleefully admitted.

In the misconduct hearing, Dennis took the opportunity to get expert testimony on the record, and prepared to send a subpoena to have Mr. Engineer testify. He had been almost instantly stabbed in the back by Ken Hodgell and Mr. Stooge, and was 69 years old at the time and unemployable, with bladder cancer. But he had played in the big time, and when he was with Dennis in Yakima, he had measured COPs of 12 with Dennis’s heat pump. Mr. Deputy and the prosecution had done everything in their power to keep performance data from the heat pump from being introduced into court, but when Dennis got out of jail and could defend himself, here it came.

As Dennis and Alison began going through the process of subpoenaing Mr. Engineer, the prosecution got wind of it and sent Mr. Investigator to Ellensburg, and Dennis received a report of his visit, which stated that Mr. Engineer called Dennis every bad name in the book. Dennis then called Mr. Engineer and talked to him for the first time since he had been jailed, and Mr. Engineer was his usual friendly self, happy that Dennis was out of jail, and happily offered to testify on Dennis’s behalf.

By that time, I was married, we had sold my wife’s home, and we were living with Mr. Professor (Dennis and his family had moved out some months before), and Mr. Engineer stayed with Mr. Professor. It was a happy meeting with him, and the last time that I saw him, as he died a few months later. We all loved the old man. During his stay in Ventura, primarily to testify at the misconduct hearing, he visited for days with Mr. Researcher, and to his credit, he told Mr. Researcher what a “couple of saps” they were to go work for Ken Hodgell and friends.

The report that Mr. Investigator wrote about his trip to Ellensburg was a series of lies about what Mr. Engineer had actually said, and Mr. Engineer said so on the witness stand. Being caught telling Big Lies did not seem to slow down the prosecution at all, as they just told more lies to replace the discredited ones. That was the American “justice” system at work.

To give an example of the character of the “investigation” that took place in Ellensburg, one of the many leading statements that Mr. Investigator made was to have Mr. Engineer confirm that Dennis in fact had never had the heat storage technology that he sometimes promoted (which was written in his report as being confirmed by Mr. Engineer). Fifty yards from where they stood was Mr. Engineer’s barn, which I had helped move Mr. Inventor’s heat storage technology into four years earlier, where it still sat. Mr. Engineer replied to Mr. Investigator that not only did Dennis have that technology, but if Mr. Investigator could bring it upon himself to walk fifty yards with Mr. Engineer, he could see it for himself. Mr. Investigator, who had traveled a thousand miles to be there, declined to walk those fifty yards. In The Alternative, Dennis said that Mr. Engineer had to remind Mr. Investigator, when he was on the witness stand, that they indeed walked over and saw the heat storage technology. It was part of his testimony, when Mr. Big Time Attorney read Mr. Investigator’s report, line-by-line, to get either Mr. Engineer’s affirmation that he really said those things or deny them, and Mr. Engineer called nearly every statement of the report a lie.

I recall that Mr. Engineer volunteered to me that Mr. Investigator declined to walk those fifty yards. Maybe he initially declined, and then Mr. Engineer insisted and dragged him over there.

Mr. Researcher also testified, finding his courage after the tide had turned, and told of watching the deputies photographing the blueprints in his office, and the threats that Mr. Deputy had made to him. Those were among the biggest crimes committed during the entire ordeal, but even getting the testimony on the record was not enough. In a legal system that had the faintest resemblance to a “justice” system, it would have been, but what was happening was really a more refined version of kangaroo court. The only reason for those hearings was that we never gave up and had Mr. Big Time Attorney in our camp. The vast majority of people would have been defeated long ago by the kangaroo court.

But what happened a few weeks before Mr. Engineer’s testimony was really the turning point for Mr. Big Time Attorney, and not in a good way. That takes a little telling, and is in the next post.

Best,

Wade

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Hi:

While working for that big CPA firm, I came into contact with lawyers regularly, and have worked with them daily for the past dozen years. I still keep in touch with a friend who I went to Europe with more than 40 years ago, and he became a lawyer, like his father did. A relative went to Harvard Law School, and I have seen lawyers go into law school or the profession starry-eyed, to slowly become cynical. That friend who I went to Europe with rhapsodized about the legal profession as a teenager, but his first career stint was as a prosecutor in the LA area, and after a couple of years of that job, when I would talk to him, he marked his weeks by how many years of prison that his prosecutorial targets “earned.” He began despising his job, and eventually got out.

Mr. Big Time Attorney, like almost all attorneys and most American doctors, became a lawyer for the money. I don’t know if it was only for the money, but he was Jewish and became a Constitutionalist who defended tax protestors as a white-collar crime specialty. He told me that the courtroom was not a place to go looking for the truth, and that his only purpose in the courtroom was to find his clients innocent of the charges against them. I would hesitate to call him some kind of idealist, but he seemed to be a decent man.

When the DA’s office tried to prevent him from getting his California license, Mr. Big Time Attorney got a preview of the kind of people he was dealing with, and the antics of the prosecution slowly disgusted him. He had never seen anything quite like it, and during one of those misconduct hearings held the week that I got married, for which I once again took the day off of work to attend, Mr. Deputy was once again too “ill” to testify, and Mr. Big Time Attorney was about to drive four hours back to San Diego, as another wasted day. However, that day was “special.” The judge began the hearing by noting that Mr. Deputy was once again too “ill” to testify, but the prosecution made a new motion and, as usual, they sprang it on Mr. Big Time Attorney in the courtroom, so that he could not prepare to argue it.

With Mr. Deputy hiding in his house, the prosecution decided that the best defense was a good offense. Ms. Prosecutor filed a motion to simply have Dennis rejailed, with no bail that time. The motion was solely based on Mr. Investigator’s work, and his report had the same fidelity to the truth that his report from his visit to Mr. Engineer’s home had, which is to say none at all. It was a string of misrepresentations, rumors, and lies, and the gist of the argument was that Dennis was trying to rebuild his business, so the prosecution wanted him jailed before trial so that he could no longer fleece the public. The judge nearly laughed at their motion, and denied it. After the hearing, we went back to Dennis’s offices (Mr. Professor was funding Resurrection Marketing, which helped bankrupt him when it was all over), and I could see Mr. Big Time Attorney’s anger, but it was a cold, professional anger. He was about to get the education of his career.

Best,

Wade

Edited by Wade Frazier
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Hi:

Here is an example of my fallible memory. When Dennis escaped jail, I was no longer worried about him and did not pay much attention to the case after that, as I knew full well how resourceful Dennis was. That is relative, however. I attended hearings, interacted with Mr. Big Time Attorney, testified at the misconduct hearings, read motions from both sides, and could not entirely avoid involvement. But I largely avoided Dennis and my family for that next year. I probably saw Dennis once a month or so, my family less often, and my mother not at all. I would only see her three more times for the rest of her life, and the next time would not be until 1996. I have no involvement with any of my surviving immediate family, as one of the many prices of my journey.

As I reread parts of The Alternative, I realized that I wrote incorrectly about the fraud charges. They were dismissed, but not as soon as I thought that they were. When Dennis got out of jail and was able to defend himself, it was no longer any fun for Mr. Deputy and Ms. Prosecutor. Mr. Deputy eventually hid in his house for months, and once Mr. Big Time Attorney took the case, there was no more snickering in open court from Ms. Prosecutor. She was eager to settle the case and offered to drop the fraud charges early on. But her superiors had to approve any deals, and they refused to, so the case wound on. They made at least one offer to drop the fraud charges, and indeed dropped them when the judge took Mr. Big Time Attorney hostage and forced Dennis to capitulate, but that comes later.

So, I did not quite remember the facts accurately. That is why it pays to refer to the documents when writing from memory, of events that happened many years earlier, even if you have eidetic memory. I had to make a small tweak to fix it. I continually tweak my work, to fix things, make them better, etc. It is one of the advantages of having a site instead of publishing books. :)

Best,

Wade

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Hi:

As a prelude to Mr. Big Time Attorney’s awakening moment, and not in a good way, Mr. Researcher’s report of Mr. Investigator’s open wondering of where Dennis was getting his money from came from a phone call that Mr. Investigator made to Mr. Researcher after he testified at the misconduct hearing. During that phone call, Mr. Investigator said that the judge informed the prosecution that he would not dismiss the case, no matter how much misconduct came out of the hearings. Mr. Researcher had been driven into hiding by Mr. Deputy’s threats, not to mention his other crimes, and Mr. Investigator’s call is legally called “tampering with a witness.” Mr. Researcher also received a visit from an IRS investigator, in another obvious attempt at intimidation. They were trying to drive Mr. Researcher back into hiding or to move from Ventura County, so that he would not testify any further.

Mr. Big Time Attorney was on a case defending against the IRS in which he had to carry a gun, as he had threats made on his life, but Ventura County’s legal gangsters were in a class by themselves. He had never seen anything like it. A couple of days after the prosecution’s motion to have Dennis rejailed with no bail, Mr. Big Time Attorney called Dennis. He had spent the previous two days writing a lawsuit, on his own time, that he planned to wage in federal court. He called Dennis and said, “These people are scum, and I have a duty to remove them from the legal profession.” Mr. Big Time Attorney asked Dennis to contact all of LA’s media, to be at a press conference on the courthouse steps, before he filed the lawsuit (which became case number 90-1942). Dennis cautioned him that the only media coverage that he ever received was smear jobs, and that the media would likely not attend the press conference. Mr. Big Time Attorney replied, “They always come to my press conferences!” Mr. Big Time Attorney also contacted a pal at the FBI, to initiate an investigation into Ventura County.

Dennis dutifully contacted LA’s media, by fax and phone call, to announce the press conference, and received replies that media reporters would attend. On the morning of April 18, 1990, Mr. Big Time Attorney stood on the front steps of the federal courthouse in downtown LA (where I had filed for bankruptcy little more than a year earlier), and no press was there. He sat on the courthouse steps with Dennis, stunned that no media was there. As they sat there, across the street was a camera crew from an LA TV station, recording a story about a crack in a building and its vulnerability to an earthquake. Mr. Big Time Attorney walked over to the reporter and said that on the courthouse steps was the story of the decade, and infinitely more important than a crack in a building. The reporter replied that she was aware of his story and was excited about it, and asked her editor to allow her to cover Mr. Big Time Attorney’s press conference, but was informed that she was forbidden to cover it, so she went back to covering the crack in the building.

Dennis said that Mr. Big Time Attorney was never the same after that moment. He realized that whoever was behind Dennis’s persecution made the IRS look like grade-school bullies. Dennis said that Mr. Big Time Attorney felt like he was shaking his fist at a hurricane. He was beginning to get educated, but his sharpest lessons were still ahead of him.

Best,

Wade

Edited by Wade Frazier
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Hi:

As I have written, Mr. Big Time Attorney did not primarily become a Constitutionalist attorney because of some principled stand, but because it was a way to make a name for himself and make money in that legal niche. However, just like all professions, there are professional standards of behavior, and Mr. Big Time Attorney was used to them, in the federal courts east of the West Coast. What he saw in California was a horse of a different color. He had stumbled into the most corrupt legal system in the USA, from the city and county level to the state and federal level. What happened in Ventura was his christening into how law was practiced in California.

While writing these posts, and in recent years, I surfed on various players in the Ventura saga, to see if they were still alive, what they might have been up to, etc. For instance, that attorney who had me put fake books on his shelves had a long career as a notable judge.

I saw where Dennis’s first attorney was berated and fined by the judge for rolling his eyes during a trial. That was about one-thousandth of what Mr. Deputy did at the preliminary hearing, which was pointedly ignored by the kangaroo court judge. It was not only the corruption that was so mind-boggling in Ventura, but they dispensed with even elementary professional standards, as if they did not even know that they existed. Ms. Prosecutor’s endless lies shocked all who initially heard them, such as Dennis’s second attorney. For me, what was also highly telling was that she acted like a gossipy housewife, which is what she likely was before she went into law.

As I have mentioned plenty, inventors, and especially free energy inventors, invent to get rich and famous. I first got an inkling of it when Mr. Inventor befriended me and told me how inventors’ groups worked, and it escalated from there, to how Mr. Inventor himself acted, to watching Victor Fischer in action, and even Mr. Mentor. Get two inventors in a room and be prepared to watch a contest for dominance, and Ms. Prosecutor tried to play people off against each other, such as accusing me of perjury for my truthful testimony. During the second interrogation of Mr. Researcher, Ms. Prosecutor tried to play him off against Fischer, and he kind of obliged her (Mr. Researcher earned a few integrity points for his behavior during the Ventura ordeal, but it was only a few) and said a few unflattering things about Fischer, and Ms. Prosecutor giggled and said, “fishy Fischer.”

I have written about my fallible memory, and it primarily applies to events that I heard about second-hand, as I would hear bits and pieces and assemble my view of the situation. That is what can lead to fallible memory, when it was not a direct experience in the first place. As I have written, many events from my days with Dennis I did not discover until I read about them in Dennis’s books, partly because of the secrecy games that Dennis plays, but also because Dennis was running so fast and hard that his rendition of the events could be spotty, as he chose what was most important to discuss/reveal. It was not so much being self-serving or manipulative, but that there was so much to tell. But I have what is called eidetic memory, and when I saw or heard something firsthand, then my memory was never fallible to any significant degree, and I can see and hear those memories many years later, as if they happened yesterday, particularly ones with an emotional impact. So, I can clearly recall listening to Ms. Prosecutor say, “fishy Fischer,” and I recall thinking how incredibly unprofessional such a statement was.

That was far from the only time that I saw her level of professionalism, or lack thereof. When Mr. Big Time Attorney was on the case, I read Ms. Prosecutor’s rebuttals to Mr. Big Time Attorney’s motions. I am not kidding; around half of her rebuttals were of the bureaucratic kind, such as the motion was not printed on the right kind of paper. A particular filing supposed to have blue paper on a certain page, and in the filing was a white page instead. I vividly recall reading those kinds of rebuttals. That was the best that a gossipy housewife who went to the one-building law school could come up with. When her rebuttals were of “substance,” they were sickening.

On the misconduct hearing in general, she fell back on “precedent,” as she did from the beginning of her involvement in the case. When she made the motion to deny Dennis’s freedom if he even raised their astronomical bail, equating a SAMP with heroin dealing, she showed how she could come up with a precedent to justify anything.

In her motion to dismiss the misconduct motion and end the misconduct hearings, Ms. Prosecutor cited a precedent in which a sheriff in the USA openly threatened a witness, saying that he would arrest the witness if he testified, and when the witness did testify, the sheriff arrested the witness as soon as he left the witness stand, literally on the courthouse steps, and that case was not dismissed due to prosecutorial misconduct.

Ms. Prosecutor was practicing lowest-common-denominator law, in that if somebody in the USA did something more corrupt than in Ventura and got away with it, then it was justified. This again harkens to the structural evil in the USA’s legal system, in which precedents set law, as each precedent keeps lowering the bar for acceptable behavior. If the deputies had in fact murdered witnesses (as would likely be proven beyond doubt for JFK’s murder, for instance, if there was a shred of honesty in the American legal system), then Ms. Prosecutor would have surely scurried to find a precedent that justified even that. If she was competent, she would have cited the landmark case that Mr. Big Time Attorney was on just the year before, in which felony acts by the prosecution were ruled to not taint the state’s case.

Reading such “logic” initially amazed me, but I soon came to realize that it was just a day at the office in the USA’s legal system, in which any and all evil becomes “legal,” just like everything that Hitler did was legal.

Mr. Big Time Attorney got both barrels of Ms. Prosecutor’s unprofessionalism and legal “logic” from his first day on the case, when she tried to deny his getting his license to practice in California. If he was interviewed today and was willing to speak candidly (and I doubt that he would be), I am sure that Mr. Big Time Attorney would have quite a litany of the unprofessional and even criminal conduct of Ms. Prosecutor and Mr. Investigator to relate. That surely had a great deal to do with his filing that lawsuit in federal court. However, as Gary Wean discovered in his adventures, the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals is by far the most corrupt in the USA, and that is saying something, with a literal gangster sitting on the bench today, as he has for nearly the past 40 years. In Gary’s book, he wrote of his early travails in the appeals court, as the gangster judge dismissed one of his lawsuits with prejudice (meaning that it could not legally be brought again), when no evidence was admitted, when no hearings were held, when the plaintiff was risking his life to simply file the lawsuit. Gary talked to a nationally-known attorney, who frankly discussed how the Ninth Circuit court was in a class by itself in the USA, with legendary corruption and kangaroo court rulings. Mr. Big Time Attorney was about to discover that himself, and his “press conference” was just a preview.

Best,

Wade

Edited by Wade Frazier
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Hi:

After his non-existent “press conference” ended, Mr. Big Time Attorney’s enthusiasm for the case waned. He was not about to make a splash in California, exposing Ventura County’s gangsters for who they were. Dennis was feverishly trying to revive the effort under Resurrection Marketing, and Mr. Professor ended up paying Mr. Big Time Attorney another $50K, but that well was running dry. Mr. Big Time Attorney wanted off the case. Dennis had previously had two attorneys, and the misconduct hearings had indeed taken the wind out of the sails of the prosecution, and one last courtroom anecdote should give an idea of what it was like for Ms. Prosecutor.

When I testified at the misconduct hearings, right after Mr. Researcher did, the courtroom was empty. No snickering Mr. Cub Reporter was around. He had been subpoenaed for his role in the affair, for one thing, and the story had lost its newsworthiness, as no jurisdiction likes to advertise its corruption, and the media is always an integral aspect of the corruption. As I sat on the witness stand, Mr. Professor’s wife entered the courtroom and sat in the back row of public seats. I believe that she was the only person in the public seats (I doubt that my future wife was there, but I could be wrong; I’ll have to ask her). When Mr. Professor’s wife came in, Ms. Prosecutor looked behind her to see who walked in. She interrupted my testimony with a hysterical shriek, saying, “Somebody walked into the courtroom! I do not know who it is. It might be a potential witness, so she should identify herself. If she might be a potential witness, I want her removed from the courtroom!” The judge calmly allowed Mr. Professor’s wife to stay in the courtroom.

Ms. Prosecutor was being dragged through the mud of her own making, and was not have any fun. She only asked me one meaningless question when I was on the witness stand at the misconduct hearing.

But once Mr. Big Time Attorney began to realize that he was in over his head, he wanted out, especially when the money ran out. Mr. Deputy finally overcame his “illness” well enough to testify. Dennis gave him an “A-minus” for his well-coached performance. Mr. Deputy pulled a Ronald Reagan, either forgetting most aspects of his career-making case, or getting very creative about what he remembered. After Reagan stepped down as president, he was compelled to testify at the Iran-Contra hearings. His answer was “I don’t remember” for more than 160 questions, as he was nearly a vegetable as president. Mr. Deputy’s performance displayed about that level of sentience, although it was feigned, naturally.

Mr. Deputy had plausible deniability for the espionage exercise, as he was cleverly not there when they did it, and all of the threats that he made to people he characterized on the witness stand as “warnings.” It was a very artful testimony. When he arrested Dennis and asked for the million dollar bail, which the judge rubber-stamped, his affidavit was a creative writing exercise, full of irrational “logic,” and he asked the judge to rely heavily on Mr. Deputy’s expertise as a fraud investigator, as he had worked on hundreds of cases with fraud elements in them. While he was on the witness stand, Mr. Big Time Attorney asked Mr. Deputy to regale the court with his deep understanding of fraud. Could Mr. Deputy recite the legal elements of the crime known as fraud? Mr. Deputy replied that he did not memorize minutia like that. Mr. Big Time Attorney persisted, and asked Mr. Deputy to name one, just one, of the elements of the crime known as fraud. Mr. Deputy was unable to.

As the misconduct hearings wound down after Mr. Deputy’s testimony, Mr. Big Time Attorney needed much more money if the case was not dismissed due to misconduct. He said that Dennis owed him another $60K, and that if Dennis could not come up with it, then he wanted to step down. Dennis asked Mr. Big Time Attorney to wait until after the judge ruled on the misconduct. It had really been the judge versus Mr. Big Time Attorney, with Ms. Prosecutor merely being a toady, following orders, and letting the judge put words in her mouth. She had no business being in the same courtroom with Mr. Big Time Attorney. Dennis and Mr. Big Time Attorney were in a high-stakes poker game with the judge, and Dennis’s life comprised the stakes. Dennis did not want to tip his hand until the judge had ruled, but Mr. Big Time Attorney betrayed Dennis, filing his motion to withdraw before the hearing at which the judge would rule on the misconduct.

With Mr. Big Time Attorney showing their hand that way, the hearing went a little differently than he hoped it would. The judge opened the hearing by noting that the law enforcement process was not perfect but worked reasonably well, and he saw nothing in the misconduct hearings that warranted dismissing the case. I guess that espionage and theft were simply days at the office in Ventura County, not even noteworthy, but Dennis told me that Mr. Researcher’s testimony ended up turning the tide. While I testified, the judge almost never looked at me and got me off the witness stand as soon as he could, but when Mr. Researcher testified, the judge watched him in rapt attention, with his face turning crimson as Mr. Researcher testified about witnessing the deputies photographing the blueprints, the threats from Mr. Deputy, and how he was driven into hiding by the threats. Dennis believes that at that moment, the judge was never going to allow the fraud charges to stand. Mr. Deputy and friends had stepped too far over the line, and because we never gave up, this case was not going to be easy to sweep under the carpet. So, Mr. Researcher and Mr. Big Time Attorney had indeed helped out Dennis, and Dennis was grateful for it, even if neither one of them was really very heroic.

After the judge ruled that the case would go to trial, then came the issue of Mr. Big Time Attorney’s motion to withdraw from the case. Dennis’s previous two attorneys had withdrawn, and Dennis was ready to go back to defending himself, but then the judge pounced. He told Mr. Big Time Attorney that if memory served, that he was the attorney of Dennis’s choice, and that he was going to defend Dennis in the trial, even if it bankrupted him. Just like Betsy took Dennis’s customers hostage, to force Dennis to capitulate, the judge was taking Mr. Big Time Attorney hostage, to force Dennis to capitulate.

Mr. Big Time Attorney knew then that he had lost the poker game. The judge had trapped him, and would ruin him. The judge used carrots and sticks to get Dennis to capitulate. Threatening to ruin Mr. Big Time Attorney financially was one of the sticks, and another was that the judge made it clear that Dennis did not file that form, which was easily proven and Dennis had already admitted it. That was Dennis’s “crime.” In Washington, they “got” Dennis for one person in the state misunderstanding one thing that Dennis said, and in California, they got Dennis for failing to file a form.

The judge took the case back to his chambers, and informed Dennis that he would decide matters of law. If the case went to trial, the fact that Dennis did not file the form was incontrovertible, and that the judge would give him the maximum possible sentence if Dennis demanded a jury trial. Mr. Big Time Attorney suddenly became very willing to negotiate a plea bargain; anything to get off the case and not be financially ruined.

When Dennis was in jail and making bail appeals, Ventura County’s probation department submitted an “investigative” report to the judge, which justified Dennis’s astronomical bail. It was the same kind of lying exercise that Mr. Deputy, Ms. Prosecutor, and Mr. Investigator engaged in. They all work for the same interests, and the concepts of honesty, integrity, and justice are completely foreign to people like that. People usually have to see it to believe it, and over the years, so many people have tried to defend our evil system to me, as they defend the system that feeds them, just like any in-group defense.

The judge said that because the “crime” was not filing a form, that he would recommend probation, which meant that Dennis would be under the probation department’s “supervision” for years, and they would obviously try to put Dennis back in jail for some imagined offense, so that he could enjoy Mr. Deputy’s hospitality again. Dennis said that he would rather take his chances in the courts, and the plea bargain that Dennis was forced into was this: he would plead guilty to not filing that form, but he had appeal rights all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court, on the constitutionality of a law that made not filing a form a crime.

The SAMP law was a civil law, which not one in a thousand lawyers had ever heard of, with one case on the books in California’s history. The lawyer who wrote the SAMP law estimated that up to 100,000 businesses, and perhaps far more, should have theoretically fallen under the law’s jurisdiction, but only 250 businesses made the filing, because nobody knew about the law. If anybody was suspected of not complying with that law, they received a letter, asking them to file if they might qualify under the law. For us, even after Mr. Deputy assured us that we were not doing anything illegal, our first “notice” of perhaps an inadvertent violation of the SAMP law was an armed raid in which they stole all of our technical materials.

Mr. Big Time Attorney began talking fast, encouraging Dennis to take the deal. He would do the appeal work for free, if Dennis took the deal, and if Dennis took it, he would be legally unencumbered for the estimated five-to-seven years that it would take for his case to wind through the appeals process, all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court, if necessary.

Dennis took the deal and almost lost his life because of it, but that story comes later.

Mr. Big Time Attorney suffered one more indignity because of Dennis’s case. His federal lawsuit was taking on Ventura County’s gangsters for some of the very same crimes that IRS personnel committed, and it turned into a landmark case. Some of the crimes were documented by the deputies themselves. However, it is a little different in California, and the federal court dismissed his case. The gangster judge at the federal court dismissed one of Gary’s cases with prejudice, which is unheard of. For Mr. Big Time Attorney’s lawsuit, dismissing it with prejudice was not something that they could do and keep a straight face, but when they dismissed the case, part of the ruling was that if Mr. Big Time Attorney refiled it, they would disbar him.

Mr. Big Time Attorney got the education of his career on Dennis’s case, and was firmly put in his place. The message that he got loud and clear was that mopping up the floor of the USA’s Supreme Court with the IRS was meaningless in the awesomely corrupt environment in California, and that if he thought that he would challenge the system in California, that his career would quickly be over. He got the message and meekly complied.

When I saw Dennis in 2013, he discussed Mr. Big Time Attorney’s awakening during his case. He said that Mr. Big Time Attorney took Dennis’s case, fresh from his semi-triumph in the USA’s Supreme Court, and was raring to take on the gangsters in Ventura County, to be rudely disabused of his delusions, as he was treated like a bit of dog poop that they stepped on and unceremoniously wiped him from the bottom of their shoes. Mr. Big Time Attorney was humbled, and not in a good way. He was never the same after that, realizing that powers previously unknown to him were involved.

Naturally, the FBI never investigated, just like Gary told me. With the CIA offering Dennis $1 billion to go away, there was no way that the FBI was going to snoop into the situation.

This narrative is coming to the end of my Ventura days, but there are a few more important events to relate. Then I will summarize what I learned in Ventura. Nothing that I learned before or since holds a candle to the learning experience that I received in Ventura, but I would not wish that learning experience on anybody. If everybody had to learn like that, almost no students would survive the curriculum to graduate.

Best,

Wade

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Before I leave Dennis’s legal issues in Ventura, I’ll get a little technical. What they got Dennis on, failing to file form, was a civil law. Fraud is prosecuted under criminal law. There had been only one case in California’s history under that civil law, and a section of the law allowed for criminal penalties, for cases in which the violations of the registration law were truly egregious and criminal. Although Dennis’s judge was witty and urbane, he was still a kangaroo court judge. Although the fraud charges were dropped, the judge got Dennis on that criminal sanction part of that civil law, although no criminal intent was ever demonstrated on Dennis’s part, and the judge and Ms. Prosecutor admitted it in open court. Dennis did not file a form, because he did not know that he had to, and in the “logic” of Ventura County’s legal system, that became a felony, which is a criminal act. They made filing to file a form a criminal act, but only enforced on one in 100,000 people who committed that “crime.” Dennis thereby became an unintentional felon, and his deal was to be able to appeal such a ridiculous law all the way to the USA’s Supreme Court. His deal was to challenge the constitutionality of such a law.

Dennis called it a “red tie on a Tuesday” law, in which you were one of countless thousands of people who wore a red tie on a Tuesday, and a law was passed that made it illegal, and you were the only person prosecuted under that law. The authorities could thereby capriciously get anybody they wanted to, depending in their whim that day (or the whim of whoever bribed them).

Another anecdote from those days is worth repeating. The year after Dennis escaped jail, he was forced to sign in at the jail every day, and had to ask the judge’s permission to leave Ventura. It was a form of house arrest that Dennis never received any “time served” credit for during his sentencing, in another of the innumerable legal irregularities in his case. Dennis got permission to leave Ventura to secure the services of Mr. Big Time Attorney and he got to go to a new science conference that he was invited to speak at. It was his first public appearance in more than a year, and guess who showed up when he spoke? Bill the BPA Hit Man! Bill had infiltrated all of the new science organizations, and was posing in those days as a Tesla researcher. When Dennis spoke, Bill tried to disrupt the meeting by shouting his lies, and was removed from the room. Bill then sabotaged all of Dennis’s subsequent meetings at that conference. I don’t know if Bill got a Godzilla bonus for that performance, or if it was just another day at the office for him.

New Science organizations and conferences are crawling with people like Bill. Bill “merely” heckled Dennis (as his lawyer did the day that I met Dennis), and while killing one of Dennis’s employees did not slow Bill down by even one step, and murdering people at conferences is a Godzilla specialty, Bill only used his psychopathic powers of persuasion. He staked out where Dennis spoke, and when people left, he sought out anybody who looked excited and invited them to lunch. Bill had changed costumes and was a “noted Tesla researcher” in those days, and when he took those people out to lunch, he proceeded to tell Big Lies about Seattle. Bill portrayed himself as one of Dennis’s investors, whom Dennis ripped off. The people who heard that fled from Dennis, and Dennis only heard about what had happened years later. What amazed Dennis was how gullible and stupid such people were.

Average people are putty in the hands of psychopaths, which is why they become such successful corporate executives and politicians. That is why Bill the BPA Hit Man, Mr. Texas, Mr. Deputy, and Mr. Skeptic were so successful in their manipulations of the people involved with Dennis. Their motto is, “The bigger the lie, the better,” and on the vast majority of humanity, it works.

Again, the entire point of this narrative is to show what I learned from my days with Dennis, including why there is no free energy available to the public today. Dennis’s adventures comprise the case study that all free energy aspirants should be required to study, but instead, august talking heads in the field tell Big Lies about Dennis, as they do Godzilla’s work for him.

Best,

Wade

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I was so disappointed when I heard that Dennis did a plea bargain, but when I heard what the judge did (who was soon promoted, and Ms. Prosecutor was given a judge position for her effort) I understood. By that time, I was married, living with Mr. Professor, had given notice at my job at the medical lab, and prepared to take the summer off and hike before moving to Ohio to put my wife through her doctoral program. I received a final attack from a family member for my role in what happened in Ventura, whom I never saw again, and my mother was busily compiling her scrapbook, which she would later take on tour, telling the story of her son the criminal.

But soon before I left Ventura, I had a talk with Mr. Advisor, who told me of his visit with Sparky Sweet. He did not give me any names or places, but the next year, Brian O’Leary gave me Sparky’s name a few minutes after we met, but that is another story, and it was another 20 years before I realized that Sparky lived just down the road from us. Situations like that are why Dennis was offered $1 billion to go away, not so much the hydraulic heat engine path that we were trying. Sparky had the goods, with a working free energy prototype that output a million times what went into it, as it harnessed the zero-point field. I would later discover that the Global Controllers had developed free energy technology to a commercial level since probably before I was born. Dennis could have brought Sparky’s pig to market, and we had to be stopped. That is what gave Godzilla a few sleepless nights. Encountering Joe Newman was the first time that I ever heard of free energy, but for the next four years, I was in Hurricane Dennis and did not hear of any free energy efforts other than ours.

Just this week, I have been reading the latest issue of Scientific American, and although it has good articles, it also has appalling ones, in a similar tenor to their ridicule of the Wright brothers, as if they learned nothing in the intervening century. In the current issue (November 2016), they dismissed the idea of free energy, said there was no credible evidence of visiting ETs, stumped for vaccines, dismissed homeopathy, and called climate change conspiracy theories ludicrous, but without ever mentioning that oil company “scientists” cooked it up. Geez, it was like I was reading Skeptical Enquirer, and I suppose with arch-materialist and establishment-defender Michael Shermer leading off the festivities in that article on what we “know,” I should have expected it. Shabby stuff, from the house organ of establishment science in the USA. I have even seen defenses of the Warren Commission from those people. In the Fifth Epoch, stumping for materialism and spouting interest-conflicted bromides is not how scientists will conduct themselves.

Best,

Wade

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Here is my last Ventura anecdote before I summarize what I learned from my first stint with Dennis. Of all that I had lived through, from starving and bankruptcy to the attacks of friends and family, from the endless Establishment attacks (from the day I met him), to those darkest days, the greatest devastation that I personally endured was Mr. Professor’s ruined life and premature death. Nothing else came close.

The year before we hit Ventura, Mr. Professor was a millionaire, the most beloved teacher at the local junior college, and a strapping physical specimen with a wonderful wife. I had some world-class athletic talent and could have been a benchwarmer on my high school basketball team, and maybe even on my junior college team. I had just turned 29 when we hit Ventura, and Mr. Professor played basketball with me that year. At that age, I could still perform pretty well as an athlete with no preparation, and by the end of that next summer, which I took off to try to recover, all of that hiking up mountains got me to where I could leap almost as high as I did in college. In those days, Mr. Professor was in his early 50s, and he actually gave me a game. I still look back in awe at that, being in my late-50s myself today and giving up basketball 20 years ago. That a man in his 50s played an athletic man in his 20s, and was competitive, is mindboggling to me today. Mr. Professor won the discus throw amongst North Dakota colleges at the state track meet when he was young, and paid attention my track career when I was in college, as his best student was also a track star.

Mr. Professor was also a hunter, and men from his culture grew up hunting and fishing, and he bagged a grizzly in Alaska, whose pelt was on his wall. That is not my trip, but I have some dim understanding and respect for the mentality.

The year before we hit Ventura, somebody lied to Mr. Professor about some land in a real estate deal, as far as how developable it was, and Mr. Professor lost $300K because of it. He put about $250K of his own money into our Ventura effort before it was over, and blew another $300K in a couple of “get rich quick” schemes, trying to raise enough money for Dennis’s legal defense and resurrect the business. It all came to an end soon after I moved away to Ohio, and Mr. Professor went bankrupt and had to move back to the family farm in North Dakota.

Not only was he financially ruined, but he was diabetic from early adulthood, and it spun out of control during the Ventura ordeal. He finally admitted to me that the stress of those days likely contributed to his failing health. His wife took him to Mexico, where an alternative treatment saved his legs, but his health gradually failed and he went on dialysis, and Dennis and I were among a legion of people who offered Mr. Professor a kidney, and perhaps part of our pancreas (I was not his only former student to make that offer), and he replied that he would only accept a kidney from somebody as “old and useless” as he was.

His death in 2002 devastated me, not the least of which being that voice in my head piping up and taking “credit” for leading me to him, as I said goodbye to his broken body. Tough medicine, and his death sent me into the dark phase of my midlife crisis, which lasted until Dennis invited me to the White House. Mr. Professor came through at his grave more than a decade later, to assuage my pain and let me know how happy he was to help, but I don’t want to bury anybody else whom I got involved in my journey. I have had more than enough of ruined and prematurely ended lives. More on Mr. Professor will come in future posts, but that is enough for now. I am tearing up as I write this.

Best,

Wade

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So, as the title of this series of posts states, at 116 posts and a ways to go, what did I learn from those days? More than I ever thought that I would or would want to. Human behavior could never surprise me again, and my life’s primary lesson, that personal integrity was the world’s scarcest commodity, and is the primary reason why humanity is in this predicament, was sharply driven home to me. This is very likely the lesson that my “friends” had in mind when they first spoke to me, which was likely part of the plan that I came to Earth to execute, as part of my soul’s journey, a journey that I would not wish on anybody, and each of us has our own journeys, with their blessings and challenges. I was blessed in many ways, to prepare me for my journey, but much was also “demanded,” which is how it seems to work.

Looking back, I can tell that my life before meeting Dennis, from my grooming to be a scientist, to my business studies, to my mystical awakening and study, from my baptism by fire in LA, to rescuing the hooker, was only preparation for the real-world class that I had during my years with Dennis.

While the Seattle experience was eye-opening, and class really began in Boston, Ventura was where the greatest lessons of my life were learned, by far. Summarizing the lessons that I learned during my first stint with Dennis, with the Ventura experience capping it off, will take a few posts to summarize, and here goes.

Personal Integrity is the World’s Scarcest Commodity

I resisted that lesson every step of the way, until it was beaten into my head in no uncertain terms. As I have written, many events I did not discover until later, often by reading about them in Dennis’s books, but also from conversations with the participants years, sometimes many years, after they happened, which helped paint the picture of my awareness. So, I am still digesting the lessons of the Ventura days, and have recently written about how my memory could be fallible on the issues, which is why Dennis’s books have helped at times, as well as referring to my own writings. This summary will include some events from those days that I did not discover until later.

The day that I met Dennis, and Bill the Hit Man’s attorney heckled Dennis, and when a TV reporter told Big Lies about Dennis a few weeks later, are two early examples of when I saw events but did not appreciate their context until later, sometimes years later, even many years. When my boss helped orchestrate the theft of Dennis’s Seattle company, that was an eye-opener, but more important to me was watching all of those employees cheering the theft and seeing how the “loyalists” later acted. I saw only two people in Seattle bow out with honor. There may have been some more, but of those who walked the longest miles of the journey, only two ultimately acquitted themselves honorably, and those days were only a gentle preview.

In Boston, my trial by fire began, but being attacked by that former girlfriend was again only a gentle preview.

By the time that the rocket took off in Ventura, I had witnessed about a dozen attempts to steal Dennis’s companies, and I told Dennis how shocking it was to see, and Dennis told me to join the club. That was still only a gentle preview, and after a few months of flying high, down came the sledgehammer, which began with the raid. My only experience with policemen until the raid was a few traffic tickets, almost none of which I actually deserved, and watching the police acting criminally was really the beginning of my awakening. That law enforcement officials, especially the judges, were gangsters in Ventura, my home town, was something that you could not have convinced me of when we hit Ventura, even with all that I had already seen. I was disabused of my naïveté during that year after the raid, and by the time I met Gary Wean, I had long since been radicalized and the darkest days of my journey were behind me. I had to face the impulse to commit righteous murder, and I have to thank Mr. Deputy one day for teaching me the meaning of evil, and I will likely try to help rescue him from his “heaven” one day.

But for all of the evil activities in Ventura, as public officials eagerly did Godzilla’s bidding, for the right price, what was far more educational was how those around me acted, from Mr. Inventor and the extorting “loyalists” to Mr. Engineer to those thieving employees to my family and friends, including my own mother. That Bill the BPA Hit Man, Mr. Deputy, and Ken Hodgell were psychopaths who were sicced on Dennis was not nearly as surprising to me as the behavior of those around me, such as my boss in Seattle and Mr. Stooge. I have a hard time believing that they could have been stupid enough to think that if they stole Dennis’s companies, that they jumped aboard the gravy train, but I witnessed that low-integrity so many times that I think that they really were that stupid, being the kind of fools that killed the golden goose in their greed.

I don’t want to beat this horse too much, but it was the most important lesson of my journey, which dwarfed all other lessons, which I saw confirmed repeatedly during my subsequent adventures and study. But there were also beacons in the darkness, such as Dennis, Mr. Professor, Ralph McGehee, and some others. We aren’t all execrable excuses for human beings, and there might just be enough people on Earth with sufficient integrity to help my plan to succeed, but I am not looking for heroes, partly because not enough of them walk on Earth today.

Best,

Wade

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Many lessons learned during my first stint with Dennis were really variations of that most important lesson. That fact of the human condition is one that almost everybody wants to deny or ignore, but it is the reason why we do not live in the Fifth Epoch today. Nothing else comes remotely close, from Godzilla to the man on the street. It is common, when coming to that grim realization, to become disgusted with humanity, and everybody that I know who played at the high levels in the free energy field had their moments of it, but the only way to keep going and remain productive it to just accept the fact, not judge it, and work with what we have. But that is far easier said than done.

My second lesson was grappling with a more personal delusion, which might have taken me the longest to shed, but I was well on my way to accomplishing it by the end of 1988, and it is this:

Inventors have little more personal integrity, if any, than the general population

I have often thought about why this was such a deep-seated delusion of mine, and I have a few ideas. The first is that Mr. Mentor is still the closest thing that I saw to an altruistic inventor, but he also failed to make the grade in Ventura. My first influence was the strongest. If the reading that I received from Joya Pope was valid, and I believe that it was, then I am an Artisan soul, and creativity is the positive pole of an Artisan’s expression, and the positive pole is achieved through love.

I thought that Artisans who hit their creative peak were motivated by love and would create for the highest and best for all. That is probably true to a great degree, but those moments of inspiration are rare even among Artisans, and in our world of scarcity and fear, such moments of inspiration are used to make a living, get rich and famous, and so on, so that whatever divine inspiration may have existed gets lost in self-serving motivation and the struggle for survival.

It is true that our societies mercilessly exploit creative talent. Everything that Mr. Mentor invented was either suppressed or stolen. But that road goes both ways, and I have yet to meet a free energy inventor whose primary motivation was not becoming rich and famous. I have encountered them announcing that they were the Second Coming or the Messiah, succumbing to greed, etc. It was initially shocking to witness, and I suppose that the first time that I saw it was Mr. Inventor’s “Show me the money!” phone call, and it was only the first of several stunts of his that began waking me up. But he gets credit for being the first to give me an inkling of the reality of the motivation of inventors, which he demonstrated himself before my days in Ventura were finished.

By the time I left Ventura in 1990, never to return, I had not seen one inventor who made the grade on the integrity scale, but almost nobody else did, either. If inventors have more personal integrity as a group than the general population, the difference is so small as to be meaningless.

Dennis had not quite learned the lesson yet, which I saw during my second stint with him, as I witnessed the betrayals of Yull Brown, Victor Fischer, and others. It was like I was on Diogenes’s quest for the honest man. Well, I found a few, but it was only a few.

Creative talent and genius are often put to evil use, such as with vivisection and nuclear weapons, so talent alone does not mean much, not for an Epochal quest such as this.

Best,

Wade

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The next lesson was again a variation of the first, and is perhaps the biggest reason why I am not with Dennis anymore:

The businessman’s path to free energy will not work

I came away from the Ventura experience with that idea firmly established, which built on what I experienced in Seattle and Boston, and there are several facets of it. As I came to find out in Seattle, you can even put the world’s best heating system on people’s homes for free, and the establishment gangsters will find something to get you on, even if one person in millions “innocently” “misunderstands” one thing that you said. The authorities can simply make it up as they go, working on behalf of their private interest patrons, the media is part of the racket, and few businesses can survive that one-two punch, not to mention the deadly provocateurs that they also infiltrate into the target organization, as they inflict what I call the inside-outside job. And the level of integrity of the general public is so low that a company of people working for a wage are easily manipulated by those dynamics, as they cheer having their own throats slit.

In addition, the level of personal integrity amongst the businessman’s crowd is so low that an effort like making FE happen is subjected to continual attempts by its “allies” to steal it. It was initially shocking to witness, but I came to understand that it is a normal situation. About a third of all men become sadists when the opportunity presents itself, so to find thieves peppered throughout business organizations, just looking for their opportunity to strike, is typical. When the effort is free energy-related, all efforts with any promise immediately come onto Godzilla’s radar, and his bag of tricks is deep, but the vast majority of efforts self-destruct before they become a clear and present threat, or the more local interests wipe them out, before Godzilla needs to lift a claw. The inventors themselves will betray the effort at the first opportunity, always selling to the highest bidder, and nobody’s pockets are deeper than Godzilla’s.

What kind of business effort can survive all of that? None that I know of. Only somebody with Dennis’s courage, talent, and crazed persistence can survive one of those takedowns to try again, and Dennis should be dead dozens of times over. It was nothing short of awe-inspiring to watch him shrug off incarceration, when his imprisoners were trying to kill him, but Indiana Jones can’t save humanity from itself by himself, with maybe a handful of staunch supporters, who all had their lives wrecked because they supported him.

Best,

Wade

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The next lesson I first learned about in Ventura, and I found out more about it in subsequent years, which is:

Americans do not have the right stuff to pursue free energy, but no other nationality does, either

In Ventura, we attracted people from all over the world, and many knew very well how corrupt the USA was, and I have been hearing people speculate for nearly 30 years about where on Earth the “good people” were, who could make FE happen. They don’t exist, not within the borders of any one nation. We are all the Universal People, and societies that are more humane and seemingly ethical are primarily that way because of their economic circumstances. The people with the integrity and other qualities needed to help get a free energy effort over the hump are very few and far between. Again, it is just what it is, and it does no good to judge the situation.

Back in the Ventura days, I was told by grizzled veterans that there is no place on Earth free of the dynamics that we were experiencing, and in the nearly 30 years since then, nothing that I have seen leads me to think any differently. People regularly contact me and ask if this or that nation might have the right stuff to host a free energy effort that is not only free of organized suppression, but also has a populace of high enough general integrity to mount a successful free energy effort. That is all wishful thinking.

No effort comprised of people currently living in any political jurisdiction has a chance. That is why I am trying to find needles in haystacks (with these rare qualities) in a global search that I am devoting the rest of my life’s “spare” time to doing. I doubt that people from agrarian cultures (Third Epoch) will be much help, nor will people stuck in the ideologies of the Fourth. For now, I seek people who can simply imagine the Fifth Epoch without blowing a fuse.

Best,

Wade

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