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MID(S)


Steve Thomas
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You will see references to MID (Military Intelligence Detachment) or MID(S) (Military Intelligence Detachment Strategic), or STRATMID (Strategic Military Intelligence Detachment).

The name would change depending on the time frame you are researching, as the name would periodically change.

To the best of my understanding, these were Army Reserve intelligence units.

For a better understanding of MID see:

 

Reforming Military Intelligence Reserve Components

1995 - 2005

by Colonel Thomas R. Cagley

http://www.dtic.mil/dtic/tr/fulltext/u2/a233391.pdf

 

and

 

Army Regulation 135-382

Army National Guard and Army Reserve

Reserve Component Military Intelligence Units and Personnel

19 October 1992

https://fas.org/irp/doddir/army/ar135-382.htm

5.0 Military Intelligence Detachments (Strategic) (MID(S))

 

Steve Thomas

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  • 1 year later...
On 1/15/2017 at 5:31 AM, Steve Thomas said:

You will see references to MID (Military Intelligence Detachment) or MID(S) (Military Intelligence Detachment Strategic), or STRATMID (Strategic Military Intelligence Detachment).

The name would change depending on the time frame you are researching, as the name would periodically change.

To the best of my understanding, these were Army Reserve intelligence units.

For a better understanding of MID see:

 

Reforming Military Intelligence Reserve Components

1995 - 2005

by Colonel Thomas R. Cagley

http://www.dtic.mil/dtic/tr/fulltext/u2/a233391.pdf

 

and

 

Army Regulation 135-382

Army National Guard and Army Reserve

Reserve Component Military Intelligence Units and Personnel

19 October 1992

https://fas.org/irp/doddir/army/ar135-382.htm

5.0 Military Intelligence Detachments (Strategic) (MID(S))

 

Steve Thomas

UNITED STATES ARMY RESERVE in OPERATION DESERT STORM STRATEGIC INTELLIGENCE SUPPORT:

Military Intelligence Detachments for the Defense Intelligence Agency

by John Brinkerhoff 1991

 

http://www.dtic.mil/dtic/tr/fulltext/u2/a277636.pdf

 

Military Intelligence Detachments (Strategic) Strategic Intelligence is required "for the formation of policy and military plans at national and international levels." The job of the strategic military intelligence detachment is to produce high level intelligence to assist the Joint Chiefs of Staff, Unified and Specified Commanders, and the Defense Intelligence Agency in understanding the global situation with respect to military capabilities.

 

A strategic military intelligence detachment is authorized nine personnel—normally five officers and four enlisted personnel-each of whom is an intelligence specialist. There are 59 strategic military intelligence detachments in the United States Army Reserve. Each detachment specializes in a particular region or a particular global function. The regional detachments may specialize further in a particular aspect of the region, such as transportation and logistics, or order of battle, or key targets.

The job of the military intelligence detachment in peacetime is to acquire broad understanding and deep knowledge of a particular country, region, or function.

The job of the military intelligence detachment in wartime is to apply that understanding and knowledge in developing intelligence information for the commanders to consider in making their operational plans. Twenty-three of the Army Reserve'sMID(S)s are designated for DIA under the CAPSTONE plan. The remaining 36 detachments are designated for the Army Intelligence Command, the CINCs, and Army schools.”

 

Steve Thomas

 

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Steve - I think this answers one of your questions in a way. Detachments more recently, as in 1991, consist specifically of 9 personnel. However, you found evidence that one Detachment you were able to find documentation for in 1963 contained 30 men. For me this indicates that in 1963 and earlier there was no set number for the size of a reserve military intelligence detachment, which makes Crichton’s oral history more believable.

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