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Sam Kail:

 



Posted by James Richards on July 11, 2007 (edited) in the Education Forum

http://educationforum.ipbhost.com/topic/10469-sam-kail/

- Quote -

Also, I am re-reading "The Last Investigation". Has anyone here ever interviewed Col. Sam Kail? I would like to know more about him and his connection to David Phillips. Thanks (John Bockmon)

So not to divert the 'What's It Going To Take' thread, I thought I would start a new one.

Sam Kail is one of the more interesting characters.

Born in Huntington, West Virginia, he graduated from the Huntington High School. He received a bachelor of science degree from the U.S. Military Academy in West Point. Kail was also a graduate of the U.S. Army Infantry School, Command and General Staff College and the U.S. Army War College. He also attended the Southern Methodist University.

Kail retired in 1969.

From 1970 until 1972, he served as the Republican Party Precinct 159 Chairman. In 1972, he campaigned for the Republican nomination to state House District 33-E.

Kail was the president of the West Point Society of North Texas, a vice president in the Dallas chapter of the Association of the U.S. Army, and a member of the Retired Officers Association.

In 1960, he was stationed in Havana and according to Antonio Veciana, Maurice Bishop sent Veciana to meet with Kail regarding official support. Kail said they would speak in more detail in Dallas later. I'm not sure if that meeting ever took place but Veciana felt that Kail and Bishop were well acquainted.

In 1959, an arrest order in Havana was issued for David Morales (aka Stanley Zamka). Kail was the one who handled the Cubans as Morales obviously got out.

Sam Kail was rarely photographed but this is him below. (photo not included)

Kail's son, Samuel Kail Jr. is an army man and probably worth tracking down.

FWIW.

James

Edited July 11, 2007 by James Richards

 

- End Quote -

 

Cryptonym: JMFIG

JMFIG is defined as the "Opa-locka Naval Base. Opa-locka CAC (note: Caribbean Admissions Center)

https://www.maryferrell.org/php/cryptdb.php?id=JMFIG

 

198-10004-10157 MOVEMENT OF THE CARIBBEAN ADMISSION CENTER (CAC) 1

Background on the use of the Opa-locka facility. "The Caribbean Admission Center was established in March 1962 as a joint DOD/CIA operation under CIA operational control and Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS) cover..." See https://www.maryferrell.org/showDoc.html?docId=19773#relPageId=10&tab=page - it shows that "CIA's Domestic Contact Division (DCD) had primary responsibility for obtaining positive intelligence interest from refugees." DCD officers conducted interviews with refugees at the CAC.

 

124-90019-10155: No Title

Deputy Chief of the CAC is Colonel Sam Kail.

198-10004-10153: TRIP REPORT

Colonel Sam Kail and Lt. Col. Trudencio Ulibarri are described as "the two top men" at CAC.

104-10069-10185: OPERATIO.NAL: AGREED ACTIVITIES W/ACSI

See this document for further details on Kail and Ulibarri and the relationship between CIA and DOD.

198-10004-10153: TRIP REPORT

6/30/63 from Lt. Col. James Patchell to Joseph Califano: Describes visit to CAC, operations led by Colonel Sam Kail and Lt. Col. Ulibarri. Julian Gleichauf, CIA chief of field office, is also the Director of CAC. "It is a military operation under CIA management."


 

From The Road to Dallas

By David E Kaiser,


 

(The “process” being spoken of below involves the overthrow of Papa Doc Duvalier in Haiti)

 

image.png.65a7ca7f080f2a2243ed737a4c561d53.png

 

From Our Man in Acapulco, p. 141:

https://books.google.com/books?id=QLdqgDsVio4C&pg=PA141&dq=Rose+ACSI&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjgxtiTz4zcAhUE54MKHSqQAF8Q6AEILzAB#v=onepage&q=Rose%20ACSI&f=false

When Frank Branstetter was looking for work on his return from Havana in 1959, he wrote to Colonel William Rose in the ACSI (Assistant Chief of Staff, Intelligence) office.

"Rose suggested that Brandy contact Colonel Sam Kail, the U.S. Army military attaché at the American embassy in Havana"

I have read (and I can't remember where, that it was Kail who steered Brandstetter to Crichton and his 488th).

 

Steve Thomas

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9 hours ago, Steve Thomas said:

Sam Kail:

From Our Man in Acapulco, p. 141:

https://books.google.com/books?id=QLdqgDsVio4C&pg=PA141&dq=Rose+ACSI&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjgxtiTz4zcAhUE54MKHSqQAF8Q6AEILzAB#v=onepage&q=Rose%20ACSI&f=false

When Frank Branstetter was looking for work on his return from Havana in 1959, he wrote to Colonel William Rose in the ACSI (Assistant Chief of Staff, Intelligence) office.

"Rose suggested that Brandy contact Colonel Sam Kail, the U.S. Army military attaché at the American embassy in Havana"

I have read (and I can't remember where, that it was Kail who steered Brandstetter to Crichton and his 488th).

 

Steve Thomas

I'm picking up references that Sam Kail was from Dallas:

Posted by Jerry Shinley in the alt.conspiracy.jfk newsgroup 8/28/01

https://groups.google.com/forum/#!topic/alt.conspiracy.jfk/D3WzPPT6y_s


 

New Orleans Times-Picayune August 11, 1960

Remoulade by Howard Jacobs
Havana "Fugitives' Get Royal Welcome

“Two young "refugees" from Cuba found their path unexpectedly smoothed by thoughtful New Orleanians a few days ago. The first inkling that 12- and 14-year-old Samuel and Robin Kail were en route from Havana to New Orleans came with a long distance call to Mrs. Jesse Core from her cousin, U. S. Army Col. Samuel Kail, who is stationed in the Cuban capital.

Col. Kail said the boys were en route to visit their grandparents in Dallas, and that they needed to be met and convoyed through customs and placed aboard the Dallas flight. In the emergency Mrs. Core called upon O. L. Sands, Moisant [airport] director, and Lewis Hopkins, travel consultant at International Trade Mart. Hopkins arranged for the Dallas flight, and Sands met the plane, escorted the boys through customs and placed them aboard the Dallas flight.”


The Last Investigation. By Gaeton Fonzi p. 312

https://books.google.com/books?id=imUtAgAAQBAJ&pg=PA312&lpg=PA312&dq=%22Sam+Kail%22&source=bl&ots=EpNZyJsosE&sig=l3QLXWwqWkmg4bHevrDvrPwRUHk&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjUhNaOzo3cAhVL9YMKHSabDvM4HhDoAQgtMAI#v=onepage&q=%22Sam%20Kail%22&f=false


“I spent a few days in Dallas helpng Jim McDonald with witness depositions, most of which had to do with Jack Ruby. I did, however, get to talk with a few people I had wanted to meet, including the retired Colonel Sam Kail, the military attaché at the American Embassy in Havana in 1960, and the man to whom Maurice Bishop had referred Veciana.”

 

This sort of lends credence to the idea that if Brandstetter called Rose at ASCI, Rose (or more than likely, Mrs. Dorothe K. Matlack) had Kail get in touch with him and steered him to Crichton.

 

Lester Logue, Robert Castorr, David Atlee Phillips, Frank Brandstetter, Jack Crichton... that Dallas/Fort Worth area was a real hopping place wasn't it?

 

Steve Thomas

 

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Hi Steve,

Maybe you already know this, but Col. Samuel G Kail was in the 4th Army, at least for a few years. Below are links to three service medals presented to Samuel G. Kail:

(1) Silver Star, Korean War.   https://valor.militarytimes.com/hero/106885

(2) Legion of Merit, Vietnam war.  https://valor.militarytimes.com/hero/106885

(3) Legion of Merit, (4th Army) Vietnam War.  https://valor.militarytimes.com/hero/106885

Tom

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37 minutes ago, Tom Hume said:

Hi Steve,

Maybe you already know this, but Col. Samuel G Kail was in the 4th Army, at least for a few years. Below are links to three service medals presented to Samuel G. Kail:

(1) Silver Star, Korean War.   https://valor.militarytimes.com/hero/106885

(2) Legion of Merit, Vietnam war.  https://valor.militarytimes.com/hero/106885

(3) Legion of Merit, (4th Army) Vietnam War.  https://valor.militarytimes.com/hero/106885

Tom

Tom,

 

Thank you. The Silver Star award goes along with something else I read. I wasn't sure it was the same Sam Kail, so I didn't say anything, but, see:

The 7th Infantry Regiment: Combat in an Age of Terror: The Korean War ...

By John C. McManus pp 20-21

https://books.google.com/books?id=Qw0fdADo-UEC&pg=PA20&lpg=PA20&dq=%22Sam+Kail%22&source=bl&ots=UNrAXLfv-L&sig=oRiDWgxuPN5bBLXAWZuni7tkuCM&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwj04oL97o3cAhUo44MKHfPyCbo4KBDoAQgmMAA#v=onepage&q=%22Sam%20Kail%22&f=false

 

Steve Thomas

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  • 2 weeks later...

If anyone has Shadow Warfare you will find a good bit of Conein's SE Asian activities in it and there are lots of records about his actual day to day activities in the fall of 1963 available in documents given that he was very much involved with the Diem coup....and people in DC were extremely interested in how that had come out so badly.  I found dozens of documents relating to his failed attempts to find an aircraft to fly them out during the coup...so there's lots of material to work from if you go that route.

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 Am I reading this doc that David Boykin shared correctly?

http://documents.theblackvault.com/documents/jfk/NARA-Oct2017/2018/176-10036-10151.pdf

4.e. Seems to imply  that Major General Tram Van Don is seeing two factions in American policies. I might guess that the two sides are Landsdale and administration loyalists as opposed to intelligence or other opposing influences represented by Conein.

This interpretation is influenced by1) the assumption that Don was not “played the fool” by Diem and 2) my recent line of thinking that Landsdale was a loyalist to the Office of the President while he was employed as a subordinate to that office.

Edited by Michael Clark
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Who were these "Advisors" and what unit was Whitmeyer "advising" in Louisiana?

The Monroe News-Star from Monroe, Louisiana · Page 5

March 25, 1955

https://newspaperarchive.com/monroe-news-star-mar-25-1955-p-5/

 

“Those reserve officers interested in this program are urged to contact Major George L. Whitmeyer at the office of the unit advisor, United States Army Reserve, building T-39-2, Selman Field...:

 

The Monroe News-Star from Monroe, Louisiana · Page 3

September 21, 1955

https://www.newspapers.com/newspage/89404823/


“Vacancies in the high school student draft deferment group still exist in the reserve army, Major George L. Whitmeyer, army reserve advisor, said Wednesday.

 

The Monroe News-Star from Monroe, Louisiana · Page 3

October 23, 1956

https://www.newspapers.com/newspage/84343273/


 

Looking on as Capt. Pipes reads his new commission is Major George L. Whitmeyer, unit advisor.


 

The Mexia Daily News from Mexia, Texas · Page 1

November 7, 1957

https://www.newspapers.com/newspage/11876796/


 

Mr. Castorr. who is now a- colonel in the Active Reserve serving as inspector and advisor to the 90th Division in Texas...”


 

From: Brandy: Our Man in Acapulco:

...in December, 1953 he (Brandstetter) and several other officers were attached to different units for the first three months of 1954 assigned as “Inspector/Advisors "

 

Steve Thomas


 


 

 

 

 

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Captain, William Paul “Pat” Gannaway.

https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/158496812/william-paul-gannaway

Birth 3 Feb 1916

Dearh 4 June 2000 (Age 84)

Austin, Travis County, Texas, USA

Burial Cook-Walden Capital Parks Cemetary and Mausoleum

Pflugerville, Travis County, Texas, USA

   
   
   

Full text of "Hoch Paul Correspondence"

_ ECHOES OF CONSPIRACY 
" Vol . 10, #2 
July 22, 1988 
Paul L. Hoch 


https://archive.org/stream/nsia-HochPaulCorrespondence/nsia-HochPaulCorrespondence/Hoch%20Paul%200952_djvu.txt


An article on "Spies in Dallas?" in a Dallas paper in summer 1963 lends support to speculation about active ONI interest, as it does to many ideas about a nexus of DPD, federal, and private intelligence outfits in Oswald's Dallas milieu. Capt. Pat Gannaway of the DPD (and Army Intelligence Reserve)

described the work against subversion and espionage of his Special Services Bureau, requiring "the closest cooperation" with other agencies, including the FBI, "military intelligence teams 'from the Army, Navy, and Air Force, and other federal agencies .... Dallas police have been highly successful in

recent years in penetrating so-called subversive or radical groups...."

 

Posted Tuesday, February 5, 2013

http://jfkcountercoup2.blogspot.com/2013/02/spies-in-dallas-police-alert.html

 

Spies in Dallas? Police Alert

By JERRY RICHMOND
Staff Writer

 

“A man would be a fool to say any city in the United States is secure from subversion and espionage.”

This statement was made by the man in charge with keeping an eye on activities in Dallas involving espionage, subversion and sabotage for the Dallas Police Department.

‘Sensitive’

Police Captain Pat Gannaway, head of the department’s special services bureau, and a dozen of hand-picked offices under Lieutenant J. R. Revill in the criminal intelligence section of his bureau have been assigned to work with federal and state intelligence officials to guard the Dallas area from penetration by subversives seeking to harm the nation’s security.

Within this bureau fall all the things of a sensitive nature, and they…expionage and subversive activities….must be watched at all times,” the veteran police officer and reserve lieutenant colonel in the Army Intelligence corps said.

In addition to other country and state agents, the bureau’s work involves close support of Federal Bureau of Investigation agents, military intelligence teams from the Army, Navy and Air Force, and other federal agencies with investigators operating from headquarters here.

This combined federal, state and local team has men laced throughout the industrial and strategic points in the city’s life line.

The job of the intelligence action in Capt. Ganaway’s bureau, besides keeping check on organized crime, requires the closets cooperation with these other government agencies gathering intelligence on subversive groups and individuals suspected of espionage.

Dallas police have been highly successful in recent years in penetrating so-called subversive groups or radical groups which appear likely some day to cause danger to the public.

Penetration

In many cases undercover agents actually joined these groups to get names, addresses, past activities and future plans or have established networks of informants to acompolish the same result.

Private business,, retail credit bureaus, utility companies and even employers often provide invaluable information on suspicious perons who are kept under surveillance for months without their knowledge.

With membership in a national police intelligence organization known as LEIU (Law Enforcement Intelligence Unites) the local officers are able to get information almost immediately on suspected subversives when they move into Dallas. This information is exchanged by police units as these persons move from city to city.

Captain Gannaway’s men daily face the problem of changing membership in organization under question. He noted the most difficult part of the job is the freedom of movement of known subversives, but added: “That freedom is the dearest thing we have and I would not restrict it even for those who would destroy it.”

PLANT SECURTIY

Other civilians involved as a group in national security work at the local level are corporation security officers.

Floyd Purvis, manger of corporation security for Texas Instruments, pointed out that all plants in the Dallas-Fort Worth area with defense contracts operate under strict Department of Defense security regulations similar to those on military bases.

Employees in the plants are carefully screened by security conscious personnel ofificers, and the key jobs are given strict government security clearances.

UPGRADING

Industry is taking great strides to upgrade security practices. One such group in this aera is the American Society for Industrial Security, an organization in which Mr. Purvis is a local chairman.

Such governmental and civilian counter-intelligence activities are selcom publicized until a spy is caught, but local activity by these agencies has placed Dallas and other American cities in the fight against intrigues in a web of espionage.

Every citizen has a role in the nation’s security, Capt. Gannaway concluded. Often one small tip from an individual has meant bringing the pieces together for some intelligence agency.

August 5, 1963

 

Posted by Bill Kelly at 6:50 AM

 

Steve Thomas

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19 hours ago, Steve Thomas said:

Captain, William Paul “Pat” Gannaway.

https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/158496812/william-paul-gannaway

Birth 3 Feb 1916

Dearh 4 June 2000 (Age 84)

Austin, Travis County, Texas, USA

Burial Cook-Walden Capital Parks Cemetary and Mausoleum

Pflugerville, Travis County, Texas, USA

   
   
   

Full text of "Hoch Paul Correspondence"


_ ECHOES OF CONSPIRACY 
" Vol . 10, #2 
July 22, 1988 
Paul L. Hoch 


https://archive.org/stream/nsia-HochPaulCorrespondence/nsia-HochPaulCorrespondence/Hoch%20Paul%200952_djvu.txt


An article on "Spies in Dallas?" in a Dallas paper in summer 1963 lends support to speculation about active ONI interest, as it does to many ideas about a nexus of DPD, federal, and private intelligence outfits in Oswald's Dallas milieu. Capt. Pat Gannaway of the DPD (and Army Intelligence Reserve)

described the work against subversion and espionage of his Special Services Bureau, requiring "the closest cooperation" with other agencies, including the FBI, "military intelligence teams 'from the Army, Navy, and Air Force, and other federal agencies .... Dallas police have been highly successful in

recent years in penetrating so-called subversive or radical groups...."

 

Posted Tuesday, February 5, 2013

http://jfkcountercoup2.blogspot.com/2013/02/spies-in-dallas-police-alert.html

 

Spies in Dallas? Police Alert

By JERRY RICHMOND
Staff Writer

 

“A man would be a fool to say any city in the United States is secure from subversion and espionage.”

This statement was made by the man in charge with keeping an eye on activities in Dallas involving espionage, subversion and sabotage for the Dallas Police Department.

‘Sensitive’

Police Captain Pat Gannaway, head of the department’s special services bureau, and a dozen of hand-picked offices under Lieutenant J. R. Revill in the criminal intelligence section of his bureau have been assigned to work with federal and state intelligence officials to guard the Dallas area from penetration by subversives seeking to harm the nation’s security.

Within this bureau fall all the things of a sensitive nature, and they…expionage and subversive activities….must be watched at all times,” the veteran police officer and reserve lieutenant colonel in the Army Intelligence corps said.

In addition to other country and state agents, the bureau’s work involves close support of Federal Bureau of Investigation agents, military intelligence teams from the Army, Navy and Air Force, and other federal agencies with investigators operating from headquarters here.

This combined federal, state and local team has men laced throughout the industrial and strategic points in the city’s life line.

The job of the intelligence action in Capt. Ganaway’s bureau, besides keeping check on organized crime, requires the closets cooperation with these other government agencies gathering intelligence on subversive groups and individuals suspected of espionage.

Dallas police have been highly successful in recent years in penetrating so-called subversive groups or radical groups which appear likely some day to cause danger to the public.

Penetration

In many cases undercover agents actually joined these groups to get names, addresses, past activities and future plans or have established networks of informants to acompolish the same result.

Private business,, retail credit bureaus, utility companies and even employers often provide invaluable information on suspicious perons who are kept under surveillance for months without their knowledge.

With membership in a national police intelligence organization known as LEIU (Law Enforcement Intelligence Unites) the local officers are able to get information almost immediately on suspected subversives when they move into Dallas. This information is exchanged by police units as these persons move from city to city.

Captain Gannaway’s men daily face the problem of changing membership in organization under question. He noted the most difficult part of the job is the freedom of movement of known subversives, but added: “That freedom is the dearest thing we have and I would not restrict it even for those who would destroy it.”

PLANT SECURTIY

Other civilians involved as a group in national security work at the local level are corporation security officers.

Floyd Purvis, manger of corporation security for Texas Instruments, pointed out that all plants in the Dallas-Fort Worth area with defense contracts operate under strict Department of Defense security regulations similar to those on military bases.

Employees in the plants are carefully screened by security conscious personnel ofificers, and the key jobs are given strict government security clearances.

UPGRADING

Industry is taking great strides to upgrade security practices. One such group in this aera is the American Society for Industrial Security, an organization in which Mr. Purvis is a local chairman.

Such governmental and civilian counter-intelligence activities are selcom publicized until a spy is caught, but local activity by these agencies has placed Dallas and other American cities in the fight against intrigues in a web of espionage.

Every citizen has a role in the nation’s security, Capt. Gannaway concluded. Often one small tip from an individual has meant bringing the pieces together for some intelligence agency.

August 5, 1963

 

Posted by Bill Kelly at 6:50 AM

 

Steve Thomas

Where did I read that by the early 1960’s Army Intelligence in Texas became primarily involved in domestic operations against subversion? I applied this the 488th but don’t recall why.

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As shown by the post above referring to Gannaway as essentially a traffic cop among federal, state, and local intelligence officers, I think Gannaway is an extremely important figure to look at squarely.
 
It looks to me that Deputy Chief Lumpkin and Gannaway are the ones who spread the phony saga of the non-existent "roll call" and  the lie that Oswald being the "only employee missing".   Isn't this the center of the case against Oswald?  Isn't this how it began?
 
Mark Bridger wrote a great article in 2007 called "The Myth of the Depository Roll Call" - he very carefully explains how it never happened.  Building manager Roy Truly claimed that 10-15 minutes after the assassination he saw shipping employees being interviewed, and for some reason "noticed that Lee Oswald was not among these boys."   Truly admitted that he knew other employees were missing, yet he focused on Oswald alone.  Truly claimed he asked his assistant Bill Shelley if he knew where Oswald was, and Shelley said he didn't know.  In contradiction, Bill Shelley claimed he was the vigilant one  who asked Truly "where's Oswald".
 
When WC commissioner Gerald Ford asked what prompted Truly to think that Oswald was not among his employees., Truly replied:  "I have asked myself that many times. I cannot give an answer."   He then proceeds to speculate wildly, but that was his answer.
 
Truly testified that he turned to his vice president, Ochus Campbell, talked with him, and then decided to report Oswald as missing.  Truly called the warehouse, obtained Oswald's name, address, phone number, and general description.  Truly said, "Chief Lumpkin of the Dallas Police Department was standing a few feet from me.   I told Chief Lumpkin that I had a boy missing over here - "I don't know whether it amounts to anything or not.  And I gave him his description.  And he says, "Just a moment. We will go tell Captain Fritz."   Peter Dale Scott states that Lumpkin was cross-designated with Army Intelligence.
 
On 11/22/63, the Houston Chronicle reported that Oswald became important to the police only after he missed an employee roll call soon afterwards. 'He was the only one who couldn't be accounted for,' Detective Capt. Pat Gannaway said.    There was no roll call and many employees could not be accounted for.
 
11/22/63  Pat Gannaway was the chief of the DPD Special Services Bureau.  His subordinate Bill Biggio was directing police intelligence communications at the Fair Park office on 11/22. (source:  Earl Golz) Many Army Intelligence officers passed through this Fair Park office.  
 
Jack Revill, Don Stringfellow, Bill Biggio and all the members of criminal intelligence division reported directly to Gannaway.  So did vice and narcotics.  Gannaway was a reserve Army Intelligence officer - like Lumpkin and many other DPD officers.  The famous destroyed Army Intelligence file was entitled "Harvey Lee Oswald".  The famous report of "Harvey Lee Oswald" and the employees of the TSBD went from Revill to Gannaway.
 
Ruby would frequent the Special Services Bureau since 1956 to arrange for the city licenses that he needed to operate his nightclubs in Dallas.  (pp. 2-3)   The source for this information, Mary Hartford, was Gannaway's secretary from 1956-62.  Another police chief described Hartford as possibly Ruby's "mistress" because their relationship was so close.  
 
As seen in the August 1963 article in the Dallas papers referred to in the posts above, Gannaway's office where federal, state and local intelligence officers mingled on a constant basis.
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2 hours ago, Bill Simpich said:
As shown by the post above referring to Gannaway as essentially a traffic cop among federal, state, and local intelligence officers, I think Gannaway is an extremely important figure to look at squarely.
 
It looks to me that Deputy Chief Lumpkin and Gannaway are the ones who spread the phony saga of the non-existent "roll call" and  the lie that Oswald being the "only employee missing".   Isn't this the center of the case against Oswald?  Isn't this how it began?
 
Mark Bridger wrote a great article in 2007 called "The Myth of the Depository Roll Call" - he very carefully explains how it never happened.  Building manager Roy Truly claimed that 10-15 minutes after the assassination he saw shipping employees being interviewed, and for some reason "noticed that Lee Oswald was not among these boys."   Truly admitted that he knew other employees were missing, yet he focused on Oswald alone.  Truly claimed he asked his assistant Bill Shelley if he knew where Oswald was, and Shelley said he didn't know.  In contradiction, Bill Shelley claimed he was the vigilant one  who asked Truly "where's Oswald".
 
When WC commissioner Gerald Ford asked what prompted Truly to think that Oswald was not among his employees., Truly replied:  "I have asked myself that many times. I cannot give an answer."   He then proceeds to speculate wildly, but that was his answer.
 
Truly testified that he turned to his vice president, Ochus Campbell, talked with him, and then decided to report Oswald as missing.  Truly called the warehouse, obtained Oswald's name, address, phone number, and general description.  Truly said, "Chief Lumpkin of the Dallas Police Department was standing a few feet from me.   I told Chief Lumpkin that I had a boy missing over here - "I don't know whether it amounts to anything or not.  And I gave him his description.  And he says, "Just a moment. We will go tell Captain Fritz."   Peter Dale Scott states that Lumpkin was cross-designated with Army Intelligence.
 
On 11/22/63, the Houston Chronicle reported that Oswald became important to the police only after he missed an employee roll call soon afterwards. 'He was the only one who couldn't be accounted for,' Detective Capt. Pat Gannaway said.    There was no roll call and many employees could not be accounted for.
 
11/22/63  Pat Gannaway was the chief of the DPD Special Services Bureau.  His subordinate Bill Biggio was directing police intelligence communications at the Fair Park office on 11/22. (source:  Earl Golz) Many Army Intelligence officers passed through this Fair Park office.  
 
Jack Revill, Don Stringfellow, Bill Biggio and all the members of criminal intelligence division reported directly to Gannaway.  So did vice and narcotics.  Gannaway was a reserve Army Intelligence officer - like Lumpkin and many other DPD officers.  The famous destroyed Army Intelligence file was entitled "Harvey Lee Oswald".  The famous report of "Harvey Lee Oswald" and the employees of the TSBD went from Revill to Gannaway.
 
Ruby would frequent the Special Services Bureau since 1956 to arrange for the city licenses that he needed to operate his nightclubs in Dallas.  (pp. 2-3)   The source for this information, Mary Hartford, was Gannaway's secretary from 1956-62.  Another police chief described Hartford as possibly Ruby's "mistress" because their relationship was so close.  
 
As seen in the August 1963 article in the Dallas papers referred to in the posts above, Gannaway's office where federal, state and local intelligence officers mingled on a constant basis.

Thanks Bill as always for your contribution. These connected dots are absolutely crucial.

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