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Question for Paul Trejo re Walker


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Thanks Michael. 

Paul - I also asked if you were aware of the Lemnitzer letter. What I am curious about is Walker's connections to other Generals both during his tenure and after his resignation. Surely, with all the effort you have put into studying Walker and putting forth the theory that he was an integral part of the assassination conspiracy, you've looked into this. I've never read anything indicating you have. I think you are the only person here who has examined any of his private papers. You've read and absorbed at least two books covering the subject. I tried to read the recent one, but was unable to get through it past about 50 pages. I'll get my copy out and peruse the index. But - don't you think looking at his professional relationships within the military is important? 

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32 minutes ago, Michael Clark said:

Paul, It is hardly a misreading. A reader would be hard-pressed to come up with your latter interpretation.

You wrote:

"When Eisenhower rejected Walker's resignation, but instead gave him a command over thousands of troops in Augsburg, Germany, Walker accepted the position -- his biggest promotion ever -- on the secret condition that he would promote JBS literature to his troops."

Cheers,

Michael

Grain of salt, Michael.   I explained my nuance this morning and at other times.

If I  had wanted to say that Eisenhower supported the JBS I would have said so directly. 

--Paul

Edited by Paul Trejo
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51 minutes ago, Paul Trejo said:

Paul B..

But Walker's biggest sin was failing to get along with the Overseas Weekly newspaper in Europe.

Regards 

--Paul Trejo

I have looked for, but cannot find where I read this, but it was said that General Walker did not associate, socially, with any of his fellow officers while in Germany. Attending socal functions with other military brass was important and necessary to being accepted and trusted. Add to that the belief that he was a homosexual. He was later charged twice and convicted once for lewd acts, at least one of those acts being homosexual in nature.

While I am not calling "sin", in his circles, and during his time, this is probably Walkers biggest transgression, or what Paul refers to as a figurative "sin".

Cheers,

Michael

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Paul - I never said that Ike was involved in a secret plan with Walker. Neither did you. But you implied, in your original post 4 years ago, that there was a secret plan, and that Walker's acceptance of the posting to Augsburg was contingent on this secret plan. Now you say the secret plan was with the JBS. There is something in your logic that doesn't add up. To whom would Walker have been saying he would only accept the post if he could indoctrinate his troops with JBS literature? 

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Just now, Michael Clark said:

I have looked for, but cannot find where I read this, but it was said that General Walker did not associate, socially, with any of his fellow officers while in Germany. Attending socal functions with other military brass was important and necessary to being accepted and trusted. Add to that the belief that he was a homosexual. He was later charged twice and convicted once for lewd acts, at least one of those acts being homosexual in nature.

While I am not calling "sin", in his circles, and during his time, this is probably Walkers biggest transgression, or what Paul refers to as a figurative "sin".

Cheers,

Michael

Michael,

Chris Cravens was the one to report that Walker was unpopular among other officers in Augsburg, because they were married and he wasn't.

Walker was never charged with homosexual acts in Europe -- but the Overseas Weekly newspaper was spying on him in Europe, trying for a scandal.   Walker sued them in Civil Court and won.

Walker was arrested twice in late life for homosexual acts in public restrooms -- but he was long since retired.

While Walker was a General -- and when he was a political figure from 1961-1968 -- Walker was never charged with homosexuality.   That is because the times were very different.  J. Edgar Hoover was never charged with homosexuality, either.   JFK was never charged with womanizing in the White House, as Bill Clinton would be charged.  The 1960's were very different times.

Regards,
--Paul Trejo

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12 minutes ago, Paul Brancato said:

Paul - I never said that Ike was involved in a secret plan with Walker. Neither did you. But you implied, in your original post 4 years ago, that there was a secret plan, and that Walker's acceptance of the posting to Augsburg was contingent on this secret plan. Now you say the secret plan was with the JBS. There is something in your logic that doesn't add up. To whom would Walker have been saying he would only accept the post if he could indoctrinate his troops with JBS literature? 

Paul B.,

Here is my take on the history, mainly from Chris Cravens:

1. Walker was convinced in 1959 by Robert Welch, founder of the JBS, that President Eisenhower was a Communist.   (This is found in Welch's Black Book, not his Blue Book.)

2. Walker submitted his resignation from the Army in 1959, forfeiting his Pension.   Walker could have easily retired at that point, and collected a fat Army Pension, since he had served the Army ever since he graduated from West Point as a young man.  But Walker deliberately resigned, knowing it was a slap in the face of the President.

3.  The condition for Walker's resignation was double.  First, Walker was convinced that Ike was Red, and that all of Washington DC was Red, including the Pentagon.   Secondly, Walker was convinced by the Rush Limbaughs of 1959 that he could start a lucrative new career as a right-wing speaker.

4.  The Rush Limbaughs of 1959 were roughly as follows: (4.1) Robert Welch; (4.2) Billy James Hargis; and (4.3) H.L. Hunt.  

5.  Eisenhower denied Walker's resignation, and instead offered Walker a great new job -- the best of his Army career -- namely, supervising the Berlin Wall with the 10,000 Troops at Augsburg, Germany, and their dependents.   Walker would be like a Mayor.

6.  Walker thought about it.  On the one hand, Walker would be untrue to his convictions that Eisenhower was a Communist.  On the other hand, Walker would have a free hand in spreading JBS propaganda to a captive audience.  Walker could mold (i.e. brainwash) thousands of young soldiers to  think his way.  He took the job.

7.  Walker would have explained this to his new friends -- Robert Welch, Billy James Hargis and H.L. Hunt.   They would have approved.  The US Army now became a partner with the John Birch Society in spreading JBS propaganda.

There were more people involved than just Welch, Hargis and Hunt -- lots more.  But those were the main three.  Hunt would later finance Walker's campaign for Texas governor.

Regards,
--Paul Trejo

Edited by Paul Trejo
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Paul B.,

I think you may be seeking a link between Walker and Generals Lemnitzer or Lemay, but I have found none.

Walker cut ties with the Pentagon when he resigned.  General Walker was the *only* US General to resign in the 20th century, forfeiting his Army pension.

Walker accused the Pentagon of being Communist, too, like everyone else in Washington DC.

The Generals by and large didn't like Walker.  

It was quick how fast the Pentagon booted Walker off his Cold War post.

Regards,
--Paul Trejo

Edited by Paul Trejo
typos
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Paul - according to the Spartacus entry on Lemnitzer, David Talbot, in Brothers, writes that Lemnitzer wrote to Walker saying his efforts in Germany were 'interesting and useful'.

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13 hours ago, Paul Brancato said:

Paul - according to the Spartacus entry on Lemnitzer, David Talbot, in Brothers, writes that Lemnitzer wrote to Walker saying his efforts in Germany were 'interesting and useful'.

Paul B., 

That's interesting.  General Lemnitzer probably didn't know at the time that General Walker had tried to resign in 1959, and probably thought of Pro-Blue as experimental.

But when Walker became the target of a shore-flap in Europe in 1961, the whole Pentagon shook their heads.  None stood up for General Walker.

Also, when the Senate held Subcommittee hearings on the case of General Walker in 1962, no active duty Generals showed up.

Regards,
--Paul Trejo

Edited by Paul Trejo
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Paul - I think it might be useful to know when Lemnitzer wrote the letter. What got me started looking at this was the sheer number of retired Army Colonels active in Dallas in the DPD and reserve military. I don't think I would make too much out of other Generals keeping their distance from Walker publicly. 

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9 minutes ago, Paul Brancato said:

Paul - I think it might be useful to know when Lemnitzer wrote the letter. What got me started looking at this was the sheer number of retired Army Colonels active in Dallas in the DPD and reserve military. I don't think I would make too much out of other Generals keeping their distance from Walker publicly. 

Paul B.,

When it comes to retired Generals, your point has more weight.  Many, if not most, retired US Generals joined some sort of Right-Wing organization.  Certainly they joined Anticommunist organizations in bulk.   They also joined the DPD and reserves.

It is simply bad form for a sitting US General to criticize the US President.  It's a court-martial offense.

But when they retire -- nothing they say can remove their Pensions from them.  They have free speech when retired.

Yet it does make a big difference when they are in active duty in the Army.   Not one US General came to the US Senate Subcommittee in 1962 to speak up for Ex-General Walker.   He had no friends at that level.  That's important.

There was one retired US General who always stood by Walker's side, namely, Clyde Watts, who was also his attorney.  Clyde Watts kept Walker out of so much trouble it's hard to tally it all.

Regards,
--Paul Trejo

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