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Attorney's file on Roger Stone, LaRouche and Russia influencing the 2016 presidential election


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Every once in awhile i make a mistake and come in under the wrong internet viewer.

And it makes me understand why I do not miss CV.

 

For anyone in their right mind to place Carter over Kennedy on health care, well that explains a lot about the ignore button and why its so handy..

https://historynewsnetwork.org/article/131473

Edited by James DiEugenio
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1 minute ago, Ty Carpenter said:

This is immature. My comments were meant to refer to the system as a whole, not one specific Doctor.

Is the Canadian healthcare system bad?

I think it’s important to remember that there’s no “Canadian” healthcare system, there are provincial systems. If there’s anything about Canada’s healthcare system that the US should learn and imitate, it’s that.

Secondly, the problems that the generally positive reaction to healthcare in Canada is that issues with the system itself are overlooked. I remember talking to a woman that had lived in East Germany - we were talking about the super Baltic beach holiday we’d just had. She boasted that when she lived in the East, they got Baltic holidays for free. She was very proud of that, after a bit, we discovered that her holiday was in January.

I have lived in Canada and and in Germany and if you want to have a healthcare system, I’d say Germany’s was the one you want to copy.

This is not to say that Canada’s provincial healthcare systems are bad, but nearly everyone has a waiting period story. I know of many people in Canada that pay for private insurance for treatment in the US - people won’t throw money away unless they feel a perceived need to.

Canadians don’t have a bad healthcare system, far from it. The greatest advantage that a Canadian has is peace of mind. They know that in the vast majority of cases, they’ll receive first class treatment, and leave the hospital in perfect health. They know that they won’t be bankrupt, or heavily in debt thereafter.

Doctors are public employees in Canada - how much money they are allowed to make is controlled, as is the minimum number of patients, and lots of other bureaucratic controls. I remember hearing on the news in Montreal about the police going to a hospital to arrest a doctor because he wasn’t on duty at another hospital - he was assisting in a surgery!

Yes, those stories abound - my very best friend (who is like a brother to me) has had several events that required superb medical care. He suffered from a rather rare eye condition that was treated expertly - he was once going blind, now he has good eyesight; he’s had a heart valve replaced. He would not have received better care anywhere else in the world.

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4 minutes ago, Cliff Varnell said:

Is the Canadian healthcare system bad?

I think it’s important to remember that there’s no “Canadian” healthcare system, there are provincial systems. If there’s anything about Canada’s healthcare system that the US should learn and imitate, it’s that.

Secondly, the problems that the generally positive reaction to healthcare in Canada is that issues with the system itself are overlooked. I remember talking to a woman that had lived in East Germany - we were talking about the super Baltic beach holiday we’d just had. She boasted that when she lived in the East, they got Baltic holidays for free. She was very proud of that, after a bit, we discovered that her holiday was in January.

I have lived in Canada and and in Germany and if you want to have a healthcare system, I’d say Germany’s was the one you want to copy.

This is not to say that Canada’s provincial healthcare systems are bad, but nearly everyone has a waiting period story. I know of many people in Canada that pay for private insurance for treatment in the US - people won’t throw money away unless they feel a perceived need to.

Canadians don’t have a bad healthcare system, far from it. The greatest advantage that a Canadian has is peace of mind. They know that in the vast majority of cases, they’ll receive first class treatment, and leave the hospital in perfect health. They know that they won’t be bankrupt, or heavily in debt thereafter.

Doctors are public employees in Canada - how much money they are allowed to make is controlled, as is the minimum number of patients, and lots of other bureaucratic controls. I remember hearing on the news in Montreal about the police going to a hospital to arrest a doctor because he wasn’t on duty at another hospital - he was assisting in a surgery!

Yes, those stories abound - my very best friend (who is like a brother to me) has had several events that required superb medical care. He suffered from a rather rare eye condition that was treated expertly - he was once going blind, now he has good eyesight; he’s had a heart valve replaced. He would not have received better care anywhere else in the world.

So that reads as though Barry Weir believes Canada has an OK system.

Thanks.

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17 minutes ago, James DiEugenio said:

Every once in awhile i make a mistake and come in under the wrong internet viewer.

And it makes me understand why I do not miss CV.

 

For anyone in their right mind to place Carter over Kennedy on health care, well that explains a lot about the ignore button and why its so handy..

https://historynewsnetwork.org/article/131473

I prefer that you ignore me Jim.

Meanwhile...

https://potus-geeks.livejournal.com/407700.html

In the 1976 US Presidential election campaign, Democratic candidate Jimmy Carter proposed health care reform that included key portions of the universal national health insurance bill that had been put forth by Senator Ted Kennedy. Carter won the election, defeating President Gerald Ford on November 2, 1976. Carter won the popular vote by 50.1 percent to 48.0 percent for Ford, and received 297 electoral votes to Ford's 240.

330276_600.jpg

Following Carter's election, the new President and the Senator from Massachusetts became embroiled in an argument over what health care reform would look like. In December of 1977, President Carter told Senator Kennedy that his bill had to be changed in order to preserve a large role for private insurance companies, and to minimize federal spending. Carter also told Kenned that healthcare reform had to be phased in so as not to interfere with balancing the federal budget. At first Kennedy compromised and made the requested changes, but Kennedy broke with Carter in July 1978 when Carter would not commit to pursuing a single bill with a fixed schedule for phasing-in comprehensive coverage.

In May 1979, Kennedy proposed a new bipartisan universal national health insurance bill. The bill gave consumers the choice from a number of competing, federally-regulated, private health insurance plans with no cost sharing. The plan was to be financed by premiums, the amount of which depended on the consumer's income. Kennedy proposed an employer mandate and an individual mandate, replacement of Medicaid by government payment of premiums to private insurers, and enhancement of Medicare by adding prescription drug coverage and eliminating premiums and cost sharing. The following month, June of 1979, Carter countered with his own proposal. Carter's program proposed more limited health insurance reform made up of an employer mandate to provide catastrophic private health insurance, and coverage without cost sharing for pregnant women and infants. Carter also proposed federalization of Medicaid with extension to the very poor without dependent minor children, and enhancement of Medicare by adding catastrophic coverage.

In November 1979, Senator Russell Long led a bipartisan conservative majority of his Senate Finance Committee to support an employer mandate to provide catastrophic-only private health insurance and enhancement of Medicare by adding catastrophic coverage. No consensus could be reached, and efforts at coming up with a plan were abandoned in May 1980 due to budget constraints caused by a deteriorating economy.

Many years later, in a 2010 interview, Carter blamed the failure on Ted Kennedy. Kennedy would challenge Carter for the 1980 Democratic Presidential nomination. The challenge was unsuccessful, but it weakened Carter, contributing to Carter's defeat in the 1980 election. In an interview with CBS News senior White House correspondent Bill Plante, the former president said he doesn't have "any doubt" that Kennedy stood in the way of his administration's plans for national health care insurance. Carter told Plante, "I had worked very carefully with the leaders of the five committees, and they were all cooperating with me. We were writing the legislation for pretty much comprehensive health care. We had the full support and intimate involvement of Senator Kennedy and Senator Long, who was also a chairman of a major committee in the Senate and the three chairman of the committees in the House. They were all working with me. At the last minute, the same week we were going to reveal what we have finally come forward to present to the entire Congress and the public, Senator Kennedy decided not to support it."

tedjimmy

In his 2010 book "White House Diary," Carter describes Kennedy's withdrawal as "a very great disappointment to me" -- and cites it as the reason his health care bill died. Carter told CBS News "It could have been a major step forward at that time which unfortunately did not happen. He considered himself the inevitable next president and maybe he wanted to have his, I'd say, gold plated comprehensive plan put into effect under his own administration. Or maybe he didn't want me to have a major legislative success."
Edited by Cliff Varnell
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11 minutes ago, Cliff Varnell said:

I prefer that you ignore me Jim.

Meanwhile...

https://potus-geeks.livejournal.com/407700.html

In the 1976 US Presidential election campaign, Democratic candidate Jimmy Carter proposed health care reform that included key portions of the universal national health insurance bill that had been put forth by Senator Ted Kennedy. Carter won the election, defeating President Gerald Ford on November 2, 1976. Carter won the popular vote by 50.1 percent to 48.0 percent for Ford, and received 297 electoral votes to Ford's 240.

330276_600.jpg

Following Carter's election, the new President and the Senator from Massachusetts became embroiled in an argument over what health care reform would look like. In December of 1977, President Carter told Senator Kennedy that his bill had to be changed in order to preserve a large role for private insurance companies, and to minimize federal spending. Carter also told Kenned that healthcare reform had to be phased in so as not to interfere with balancing the federal budget. At first Kennedy compromised and made the requested changes, but Kennedy broke with Carter in July 1978 when Carter would not commit to pursuing a single bill with a fixed schedule for phasing-in comprehensive coverage.

What part of "broke with Carter" does DiEugenio not understand?  The whole deal fell thru because Kennedy demanded a "fixed schedule."

11 minutes ago, Cliff Varnell said:

In May 1979, Kennedy proposed a new bipartisan universal national health insurance bill. The bill gave consumers the choice from a number of competing, federally-regulated, private health insurance plans with no cost sharing. The plan was to be financed by premiums, the amount of which depended on the consumer's income. Kennedy proposed an employer mandate and an individual mandate, replacement of Medicaid by government payment of premiums to private insurers, and enhancement of Medicare by adding prescription drug coverage and eliminating premiums and cost sharing. The following month, June of 1979, Carter countered with his own proposal. Carter's program proposed more limited health insurance reform made up of an employer mandate to provide catastrophic private health insurance, and coverage without cost sharing for pregnant women and infants. Carter also proposed federalization of Medicaid with extension to the very poor without dependent minor children, and enhancement of Medicare by adding catastrophic coverage.
 

Kennedy came up with proto-ObamaCare.  I admit that was a better plan than Carter's but the differences shouldn't have scuttled getting something done.

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1 hour ago, Bob Ness said:

There is no doubt the Mass Media can get crazy. John Oliver had a great interview with Monica Lewinsky about the Clinton affair that I found very touching. It's a real shark tank and ordinary people can get caught up in it unawares and destroyed. Amanda Knox comes to mind also.

I don't find what's happening to Trump to be unjustified however. He and many of his associate's public statements and actions gave rise to SC and it was formed under a unified government run by Republicans.

Off the top of my head I'd really like to know the results of the Alpha Bank/Trump server communications issue and where Milsfud is according to the Mueller report. There was plenty of suspicious activity going on.

Non-Political Opinion - The linked article is a great example as to why the Mainstream Media is becoming increasingly irrelevant. Not necessarily through anyone's fault, a typical MSM reporter will usually lack the expertise, technical knowledge or understanding of relevant minutia to be able to accurately present a set of facts, or opine with the authority of an expert.

-------------

That being said, the summary "money line" from the article is this:

"Alfa Bank believes that these malicious attacks are designed to create the false impression that Alfa Bank has a secretive relationship with the Trump Organization. In fact, there is not and never has been such a relationship."

Some Summary Bullet Points (direct quotes.) (Linked Full Article Below.)

  • In the attacks, multiple DNS requests were made by unidentified individuals, mostly using U.S. server providers, to a Trump Organization server.
  • The DNS requests were made to appear as if they originated from Alfa Bank.
  • The DNS responses from the Trump server were then erroneously returned to Alfa Bank, activating Alfa Bank’s automated security systems on February 18 and again on March 11 and 13.

JFK Assassination Analogy

Setting: A warm October Day in 1963, Mexico City, Front Entrance of Cuban Embassy, Looking Outside

A man approaches the door of the embassy and pushes the door bell.

Cuban Guard: "Who is it?"

Man Standing Outside: "Lee Harvey Oswald"

Cuban Guard: "What do you want?"

Man Standing Outside: "I want to obtain a Visa to Cuba, my name is Lee Harvey Oswald, that is O. S. W. A. L. D."

Cuban Guard: "The man who does the Visa's went home for the day, come back tomorrow."

Man Standing Outside: "OK, please tell the Visa man Lee Harvey Oswald will be back tomorrow."

 

https://founderscode.com/trump-server-pings-alfa-bank/

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1 hour ago, James DiEugenio said:

Every once in awhile i make a mistake and come in under the wrong internet viewer.

And it makes me understand why I do not miss CV.

 

For anyone in their right mind to place Carter over Kennedy on health care, well that explains a lot about the ignore button and why its so handy..

https://historynewsnetwork.org/article/131473

I'm not denying that Kennedy's health care proposals were better than Carter's but the Carter plan was the one on the table in 1978. 

Kennedy broke with the plan and nothing happened.

Pity.

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Ty, It doesn't sound like the concept of collective responsibility is necessarily one you subscribe to. But the entire problem of the suffering of misplaced people out of  Syria and throughout the Middle East can be directly attributed To GWB's invasion of Iraq and his deposing of Saddam Hussein who was a Sunni minority leader who held control over a Shia majority.

After Democratic elections, the Shia majority won and took retribution at the Sunnis forcing them  to flee their homes and in part to form radical groups such as Isis. Right now other countries in the Middle East and throughout Europe have taken it upon themselves to relocate the refugees from this calamity, and yet our immigration policy takes little to no responsibility for taking care of the problem that we have, in fact created.

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3 hours ago, Cliff Varnell said:

I read the news.  I've read that Don Jr. met with Russians who promised dirt on Hillary; I've read that Trump campaign manager Paul Manafort and his deputy Rick Gates met with a former member of Russian military intelligence to share polling data; I've read that Trump gave Russian officials secret Israeli intelligence; I've read that Jared Kushner was trying to establish a back channel to the Kremlin; I've read about 100 contacts between Trump operatives and Russians; I've read about them lying about these contacts; I've read that Trump sought to build a Trump Tower in Moscow etc etc ad infinitum.

 

Cliff, I think the point is that much of the news you have read is actually factually incorrect or a half-truth misleadingly presented. I.e. the Russian who set up the Trump Tower meeting did not represent the Russian government or have any influence with same, and in fact had provable ties with Glenn Simpson and Fusion GPS. Manafort and Gates met with their long-time business partner, as they had done most every day for over a decade, and rumours of his status as a "Russian military intelligence officer" seem completely daft when seen in context. The particular meme of over 100 contacts with Russian operatives requires one to understand the term “Russian operative” or “agent” as meaning anyone with a Russian passport or surname. That’s a loopy premise, to say the least. Otherwise, none of these alleged contacts had anything to do with the current Russian government. This is the left/liberal version of the Frances Fox Piven conspiracy, and just as intellectually vapid. I trust that Cliff is just working through his seven stages of grief and will be back to T3 soon enough.

There are no “death panels” in Canada. The medical system is fine, not perfect, and it is very very popular. There are political forces who would prefer to gut the system, but such position is an electoral death sentence. 

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2 hours ago, Robert Wheeler said:

Non-Political Opinion - The linked article is a great example as to why the Mainstream Media is becoming increasingly irrelevant. Not necessarily through anyone's fault, a typical MSM reporter will usually lack the expertise, technical knowledge or understanding of relevant minutia to be able to accurately present a set of facts, or opine with the authority of an expert.

-------------

That being said, the summary "money line" from the article is this:

"Alfa Bank believes that these malicious attacks are designed to create the false impression that Alfa Bank has a secretive relationship with the Trump Organization. In fact, there is not and never has been such a relationship."

Some Summary Bullet Points (direct quotes.) (Linked Full Article Below.)

  • In the attacks, multiple DNS requests were made by unidentified individuals, mostly using U.S. server providers, to a Trump Organization server.
  • The DNS requests were made to appear as if they originated from Alfa Bank.
  • The DNS responses from the Trump server were then erroneously returned to Alfa Bank, activating Alfa Bank’s automated security systems on February 18 and again on March 11 and 13.

https://founderscode.com/trump-server-pings-alfa-bank/

Robert, her primary source for the information in this article is Alpha Bank's website and a 303 page??? What gives? Snopes raises a better defense with neutral third parties. This is why I don't go through links people copy and paste. You're a smart guy I expect better.

Either way all I was saying is that I'd like to see the information, if any, the SC found about that issue.

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