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General Walker, Lee Harvey Oswald and Dallas Officials


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Jason,

In keeping with your most recent CT that the Dallas Police and Sheriff's deputies were the principal ground-crew of the JFK Assassination, I want to share some ideas that I jotted down while reading Professor Walt Brown's superb work, Treachery in Dallas (1995).

1. Dealey Plaza was a traditional killing zone in the history of Dallas, because its five-story County Jail was located right on Dealey Plaza.  

2.  Ever since it was first constructed in 1910, the site of Dallas County jail was the site of public executions, including hanging, electric chair and lethal injection.   As late as 1950, hanging gallows were actually constructed inside the building.

3.  The parking lot behind the picket fence of the Grassy Knoll on Dealey Plaza was a private parking lot -- operated exclusively for Dallas County employees.  In 1963, There was only one entrance, blocked by a chain across the entrance, locked with a padlock.  All those who rented a parking space there had a key.  They were instructed to exit their car; unlock the padlock; drive through; exit their car; relock the padlock, and then go park.

4. The main customers of this private parking lot were Sheriff department Deputies and employees from the County Jail and the Department of Records.

5.  This means that at any given hour of a work-day, Sheriff deputies and their pals would hang out behind the picket fence of the Grassy Knoll, on their coffee breaks, smoking cigarettes, showing off their new rifles, and sharing stories about the most recent executions, death penalty cases and notorious crimes.

This is just a taste of what's to come, Jason.   Many thanks for broaching this topic.   General Walker was not in Dallas when JFK was killed -- but I still maintain that Walker coordinated all the Dallas pieces.   In the same way, General Walker was not in Dallas when Adlai Stevenson was humiliated -- but Chris Cravens documented that Walker coordinated all the Dallas pieces.

All best,
--Paul

Edited by Paul Trejo
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12 hours ago, Paul Trejo said:

HOORAY!

An EXCELLENT result, Jason!    This is exactly the result I've been hoping for these past 6 years on this Forum!   :)

Would you be willing to join me in a review all of the WC testimony from all the Dallas Police and Deputies and Law officials on this thread?   It belongs here, because I also propose to show was how many of them were following the lead of General Walker in their JFK plotting. 

But before we can do that, we must first list them all, and then review their WC testimony, and show how many dozens of holes have always been there, gaping at us.

All best,
--Paul

Hi Paul,

Some years ago the technology consulting firm I worked for won a contract to do statistical analysis on major crime investigations.   I was not on the project, but I know the highlights.  In almost every major investigation involving dozens of witnesses, suspects, and investigators, the true criminal was a suspect from day one.  In most cases, in the first weeks of the investigation, the investigators closest to the case had an initial list of suspects which included the true criminal.  

However, in most cases it was years before the true criminal was finally determined and arrested.  In big cases, you get bogged down in endless leads, theories, and contrary evidence that distracts you from the true criminal who was a top suspect from day one. 

1. Gary Ridgway, (The "Green River Killer") was arrested in 1982 as a suspect in the serial killing of 90+ young women.  He was at the time quickly released.   It wasn't until a massive review of the original evidence that he was finally arrested 20 years later, after dozens more had been killed.   They had him right away back in 1982 and it was obvious - he was a guy who liked to pick up women and beat them up, some lived, some didn't.  But the investigation got distracted by the media, an overload of tips, and dozens of false theories.

2. Also tragically, Jacob Wetterling was abducted in October, 1989 when he was 11.  The true killer,  Danny Heinrich, was arrested and DNA tested in December, 1989, but set free.   For 25+ years endless speculation, investigations, leads, and media interest protected the true killer as the theories became more and more exotic and conspiratorial.   Finally, in 2015, Heinrich was arrested for the same reason he was arrested in 89 - he liked kiddie porn.  This time they managed to connect him back to Wetterling, and Heinrich led police to the buried body.  They had him almost from day one in 1989, but went way off course as the case drew national attention.  25 years off course.

So, for me, the JFK case is likely the same way.   The conspirators are probably among those who gave evidence in the WC.  We have been off course for 55 years.

It really just hit me yesterday as I was watching the assassination YouTube videos.   The Dallas Police are the circulatory system of all assassination operations.   It's all them.  The shooting, the crime scene, Tippit, Oswald's capture, the evidence, the patsy, Ruby, and Oswald's death.  It's DPD that makes it all possible. 

So, sure, let's look at the cops in the WC.   

Jason

...

...

Here's my draft of the police witnesses in the Warren Report.   I'm sure others have made a list like this already but I like to do my own research.  Hopefully it's a start.

source: https://www.archives.gov/research/jfk/warren-commission-report/appendix5.html

 

DALLAS POLICE DEPARTMENT AND DALLAS SHERIFF'S DEPARTMENT WARREN COMMISSION WITNESSES

Ables, Don R. D  Jail Clerk, Dallas Police Department         Vol. VII, p. 239

Adamcik, John P. D          Member, Dallas Police Department         Vol. VII, p. 202

Archer, Don Ray D            Member, Dallas Police Department         Vol. XII, p. 395

Arnett, Charles Oliver D Member, Dallas Police Department         Vol. XII, p. 128

Baker, Marrion L.A D       Member, Dallas Police Department         Vol. III, p. 242., Vol. VII, p. 592

Baker, T. L. C      Member, Dallas Police Department         Vol. IV, p. 248

Barnes, W. E. D  Member, Dallas Police Department         Vol. VII, p. 270

Batchelor, Charles D        Assistant Chief, Dallas Police Department             Vol. XII, p. 1; Vol. XV, p. 114

Beaty, Buford Lee D         Member, Dallas Police Department         Vol. XII, p. 158

Biggio, William S.D           Member, Dallas Police Department         Vol. XIV, p. 48

Boone, Eugene C              Deputy Sheriff, Dallas County     Vol. III, p. 291

Boyd, Elmer L. D                Member, Dallas Police Department         Vol. VII, p. 119

Brewer, E. D. D  Member, Dallas Police Department         Vol. VI, p. 302

Brian, V. J.C        Member, Dallas Police Department         Vol. V, p. 47

Brock, Alvin R. D               Member, Dallas Police Department         Vol. XII, p. 171

Page 485

Brown, C. W. D  Member, Dallas Police Department         Vol. VII, p. 246

Carroll, Bob K. D                Member, Dallas Police Department         Vol. VII, p. 17

Clardy, Barnard S. D        Member, Dallas Police Department         Vol. XII, p. 403

Clark, Richard L. D            Member, Dallas Police Department         Vol. VII, p. 235

Combest, B. H. D               Member, Dallas Police Department         Vol. XII, p. 176

Cox, Roland A. D               Reserve force, Dallas Police Department Vol. XV, p. 153

Croy, Kenneth Hudson D               Reserve force, Dallas Police Department Vol. XII, p. 186

Curry, Jesse Edward ACD               Chief, Dallas Police Department Vol. IV, p. 150; Vol. XII, p. 25; Vol. XV, p. 124, 641

Cutchshaw, Wilbur Jay D               Member, Dallas Police Department         Vol. XII, p. 206

Dean, Patricia Trevore CD             Member, Dallas Police Department         Vol V, p. 254; Vol. XII, p. 415

Decker, J. E. (Bill) D          Sheriff, Dallas County     Vol. XII, p. 42

Dhority, C. N. AD              Member, Dallas Police Department         Vol. VII, pp. 149, 380

Eberhardt, A. M. D           Member, Dallas Police Department         Vol. XIII, p. 181

Foster, J. W. D    Member, Dallas Police Department         Vol. VI, p. 248

Frazier, W. B. D Captain, Dallas Police Department            Vol. XII, p. 52

Goodson, Clyde Franklin D            Member, Dallas Police Department         Vol. XV, p. 596

Graves, L. C. D    Member, Dallas Police Department         Vol. VII, p. 251; Vol. XIII, p. 1

Hanson, Timothy M., Jr. D             Member, Dallas Police Department         Vol. XV, p. 438

Hargis, Bobby W. D          Member, Dallas Police Department         Vol. VI, p. 293

Hawkins, Ray D  Member, Dallas Police Department         Vol. VII, p. 91

Henslee, Gerald D. D       Member, Dallas Police Department         Vol. VI, p. 325

Hicks, J. B. D       Member, Dallas Police Department         Vol. VII, p. 286

Hill, Gerald Lynn D           Member, Dallas Police Department         Vol. VII, p. 43

Holly, Harold B., Jr.D       Reserve force, Dallas Police Department Vol. XII, p. 261

Hulse, C. E. D      Member, Dallas Police Department         Vol. XIII, p. 99

Hutson, Thomas Alexander D      Member, Dallas Police Department         Vol. VII, p. 26

Johnson, Marvin D           Member, Dallas Police Department         Vol. VII, p. 100

Jones, O. A. D     Captain, Dallas Police Department            Vol. XII, p. 58

King, Glen D. D  Captain, Dallas Police Department            Vol. XV, p. 51

Kriss, Harry M.D                Reserve force, Dallas Police Department Vol. XII, p. 266

Lawrence, Perdue W.D  Captain, Dallas Police Department            Vol. VII, p. 577

Leavelle, James R. D        Member, Dallas Police Department         Vol. VII, p. 260; Vol. VIII, p. 14

Lowcry, Roy Lee D            Member, Dallas Police Department         Vol. XII, p. 271

McDonald, M. N. C           Member, Dallas Police Department         Vol. III, p. 295

McMillon, Thomas Donald D        Member, Dallas Police Department         Vol. XIII, p. 37

Martin, B. J. D    Member, Dallas Police Department         Vol. VI, p. 289

Martin, Frank M. D          Captain, Dallas Police Department            Vol. XII, p. 277

Maxey, Billy Joe D            Member, Dallas Police Department         Vol. XII, p. 285

Mayo, Logan W. D            Reserve force, Dallas Police Department Vol. XII, p. 291

Miller, Louis D. D              Member, Dallas Police Department         Vol. XII, p. 297

Montgomery, L. D. D       Member, Dallas Police Department         Vol. VII, p. 96; Vol. XIII, p. 21

Page 493

Mooney, Luke C Deputy Sheriff, Dallas County     Vol. III, p. 281

Moore, Henry M. D          Member, Dallas Police Department         Vol. VII, p. 212

Murphy, Joe E. D              Member, Dallas Police Department         Vol. VI, p. 256

Newman, William J. D     Reserve force, Dallas Police Department Vol. XII, p. 314

Olsen, Harry N. D              Former member, Dallas Police    Vol. XIV, p. 640

Owens, Calvin Bud D       Member, Dallas Police Department         Vol. II, p. 78

Patterson, Bobby G. D    Member, Dallas Police Department         Vol. XII, p. 334

Perry, W. E. D     Member, Dallas Police Department         Vol. VII, p. 232

Pierce, Rio S. D  Lieutenant, Dallas Police Department     Vol. VII, p. 76; Vol. XII, p.337

Poe, J. M. D         Member, Dallas Police Department         Vol. VII, p. 66

Potts, Walter E. D             Member, Dallas Police Department         Vol. VII, p. 195

Putnam, James A. D         Member, Dallas Police Department         Vol. VII, p. 74; Vol. XII, p. 341

Revill, Jack CD    Lieutenant, Dallas Police Department     Vol. V, p. 33; Vol. XII, p. 73

Robertson, Mary Jane D Employee, Dallas Police Department       Vol. VII, p. 404

Rose, Guy F. D   Member, Dallas Police Department         Vol. VII, p. 227

Sims, Richard M. D           Member, Dallas Police Department         Vol. VII, p. 158

Slack, Willie B. D               Member, Dallas Police Department         Vol. XII, p. 347

Smart, Vernon S. D          Lieutenant, Dallas Police Department     Vol. XIII, p. 266

Smith, Edgar Leon, Jr. D Member, Dallas Police Department         Vol. VII, p. 565

Smith, Joe Marshall D     Member, Dallas Police Department         Vol. VII, p. 531

Solomon, James Maurice D          Captain, Dallas Police Department            Vol. XII, p. 87

Standifer, Roy E. D           Member, Dallas Police Department         Vol. XV p. 614

Steele, Don Francis D      Member, Dallas Police Department         Vol. XII, p. 353

Stevenson, M. W. D         Deputy Chief, Dallas Police Department Vol. XII, p. 91. Vol. XV, p. 133

Stovall, Richard S.D          Member, Dallas Police Department         Vol. VII, p. 186

Studebaker, Robert Lee D             Member, Dallas Police Department         Vol. VII, p. 137

Talbert, Cecil E. D             Captain, Dallas Police Department            Vol. XII, p. 108. Vol. XV, p. 182

Turner, F. M. D  Member, Dallas Police Department         Vol. VII, p. 217

Vaughn, Roy Eugene D   Member, Dallas Police Department         Vol. XII, p. 357

Walker, C. T. D   Member, Dallas Police Department         Vol. VII, p. 34

Walthers, Eddy Raymond D          Deputy sheriff, Dallas County      Vol. VII, p. 544

Watson, James C. D         Member, Dallas Police Department         Vol. XII, p. 372

Westbrook, W. R. D         Captain, Dallas Police Department            Vol. VII, p. 109

Wiggins, Woodrow D      Lieutenant, Dallas Police Department     Vol. XII, p. 388

Worley, Gano E. D            Reserve Force, Dallas Police Department               Vol. XII, p. 378

 

Edited by Jason Ward
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13 hours ago, Paul Trejo said:

Jason,

In keeping with your most recent CT that the Dallas Police and Sheriff's deputies were the principal ground-crew of the JFK Assassination, I want to share some ideas that I jotted down while reading Professor Walt Brown's superb work, Treachery in Dallas (1995).

1. Dealey Plaza was a traditional killing zone in the history of Dallas, because its five-story County Jail was located right on Dealey Plaza.  

2.  Ever since it was first constructed in 1910, the site of Dallas County jail was the site of public executions, including hanging, electric chair and lethal injection.   As late as 1950, hanging gallows were actually constructed inside the building.

3.  The parking lot behind the picket fence of the Grassy Knoll on Dealey Plaza was a private parking lot -- operated exclusively for Dallas County employees.  In 1963, There was only one entrance, blocked by a chain across the entrance, locked with a padlock.  All those who rented a parking space there had a key.  They were instructed to exit their car; unlock the padlock; drive through; exit their car; relock the padlock, and then go park.

4. The main customers of this private parking lot were Sheriff department duties and employees from the County Jail and the Department of Records.

5.  This means that at any given hour of a work-day, Sheriff deputies and their pals would hang out behind the picket fence of the Grassy Knoll, on their coffee breaks, smoking cigarettes, showing off their new rifles, and sharing stories about the most recent executions, death penalty cases and notorious crimes.

This is just a taste of what's to come, Jason.   Many thanks for broaching this topic.   General Walker was not in Dallas when JFK was killed -- but I still maintain that Walker coordinated all the Dallas pieces.   In the same way, General Walker was not in Dallas when Adlai Stevenson was humiliated -- but Chris Cravens documented that Walker coordinated all the Dallas pieces.

All best,
--Paul

I recently read Walt Brown's "Treachery In Dallas", where he zeroed right in on the Dallas PD. Great way to blend in and not arouse any suspicions. No one would ever think to question them being in the area. Easy way to manipulate evidence, witnesses, etc. The fox guarding the henhouse.

I managed to get Chris Craven's thesis on interlibrary loan last year and found it quite informative.

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On 3/15/2018 at 8:44 PM, Jason Ward said:

...The conspirators are probably among those who gave evidence in the WC.  We have been off course for 55 years.

It really just hit me yesterday as I was watching the assassination YouTube videos.   The Dallas Police are the circulatory system of all assassination operations.   It's all them.  The shooting, the crime scene, Tippit, Oswald's capture, the evidence, the patsy, Ruby, and Oswald's death.  It's DPD that makes it all possible. 

So, sure, let's look at the cops in the WC.   

Jason

...Here's my draft of the police witnesses in the Warren Report.   I'm sure others have made a list like this already but I like to do my own research.  Hopefully it's a start.

DALLAS POLICE DEPARTMENT AND DALLAS SHERIFF'S DEPARTMENT WARREN COMMISSION WITNESSES...

<snip>

Jason,

You've got a fairly complete list here -- and obviously it's too large, at 91 names.   So, let's whittle it down.

In my opinion, perhaps 20 of these Dallas officers were part of the JFK plot.   So, perhaps upwards of 80% of these names above are innocent of any conspiracy charges.   That's just a rough guess.

But let's at least concentrate on a few at a time, so that I don't seem to be pushing my CT too early.

Let's start with the Sheriff's department, only.    I say this because these were the men who (1) raced to the Grassy Knoll first; (2) found Oswald's rifle on the 6th floor TSBD.

Some of them were ALSO at the Texas Theater, and ALSO at Ruth Paine's house.  So, this is the place to start, in my opinion.   Here's my initial list:

Sheriff Bill Decker

Deputy Eugene Boone

Deputy Luke Mooney

Deputy Buddy Walthers

Constable Seymour Weitzman

 

 

Also, let's save Bill Decker for last, because his WC testimony almost entirely bypasses the JFK assassination, and concentrates almost entirely on the Lee Harvey Oswald killing.

 

All best,
--Paul

Edited by Paul Trejo
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Paul- you have it backwards in many ways

Physically seizing the POTUS body is one thing. Changing the laws of the state of Texas would have been quite another feat. Even if a trial judge allowed inadmissible evidence and instructed the jury that it could consider that evidence, there would have been multiple appeals. very different process.  

Regarding Marina,  she told the government what it wanted her to say to AVOID being deported. Since she gave sworn testimony, she could be subject to perjury which is probably why she has been very careful since then in what she says. he was interrogated  46  without benefit of counsel before her first appearance before the WC. Indeed. Rankin stated this on the record in her first testimony on 2/3/64. she made it clear in this session that she was "cooperating".  

Marina is the only person who could tie LHO to possessing the rifle, to the note that was allegedly written before the Walker shooting, to what he told her when he came back, to the presence of the rifle in the blanket. How do you know she was not lying about these facts?

The WC called her four times because of its frustration with her evolving testimony. this is documented in Shennon's book and staff memos of Willens. As Casey Stengel used to say "You can look it up"    

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14 hours ago, Roger DeLaria said:

I recently read Walt Brown's "Treachery In Dallas", where he zeroed right in on the Dallas PD. Great way to blend in and not arouse any suspicions. No one would ever think to question them being in the area. Easy way to manipulate evidence, witnesses, etc. The fox guarding the henhouse.

I managed to get Chris Craven's thesis on interlibrary loan last year and found it quite informative.

Hi Roger, I will try to get Treachery in Dallas from the library, thanks.  There is a free online copy but even that has to be checked out... 

I think really we've all forgotten the way things work on a local level.  If there's a crime, someone in jail, 3 murders, etc., it's the local police who are doing the operational and back office work for all of it.   This has to be a DPD sponsored event, with them as the critical link in making sure the local evidence, witnesses, crime scene, bodies, etc. are all shut down asap.

 

5 hours ago, Paul Trejo said:

 

Some of them were ALSO at the Texas Theater, and ALSO at Ruth Paine's house.  So, this is the place to start, in my opinion.   Here's my initial list:

Sheriff Bill Decker

Deputy Eugene Boone

Deputy Luke Mooney

Deputy Buddy Walthers

Constable Seymour Weitzman

 

 

 

Paul, I like pedantic thoroughness, so I will be compiling a profile of all 91 names on the list.  I've read through DPD jailer Don Ables and DPD detective John Adamcik ...and will post shortly about them.   In keeping with your idea, I will also look at Sheriff's Deputy Eugene Boone today and discuss his testimony.

Jason

Edited by Jason Ward
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1 hour ago, Jason Ward said:

Hi Roger, I will try to get Treachery in Dallas from the library, thanks.  There is a free online copy but even that has to be checked out... 

I think really we've all forgotten the way things work on a local level.  If there's a crime, someone in jail, 3 murders, etc., it's the local police who are doing the operational and back office work for all of it.   This has to be a DPD sponsored event, with them as the critical link in making sure the local evidence, witnesses, crime scene, bodies, etc. are all shut down asap.

 

Paul, I like pedantic thoroughness, so I will be compiling a profile of all 91 names on the list.  I've read through DPD jailer Don Ables and DPD detective John Adamcik ...and will post shortly about them.   In keeping with your idea, I will also look at Sheriff's Deputy Eugene Boone today and discuss his testimony.

Jason

Jason - thanks for the DPD detailed info. No doubt some of them were on the inside of the plot. You are right that they controlled local evidence, crime scene, etc. But your use of the word ‘sponsored’ seems inappropriate, and there were many things Dallas cops and detectives could not control, pre and especially post assassination. I’m not going to list them because I know that you and others reading can easily see this. If Walker was running things, the same caveats apply, though Walker’s military connnections are worth noting. He at least might have been in a position to know he had allies that would be able to control the autopsy. 

What do you intend to do with your list of names? I would suggest that if you are going to look at biographical info on each one you make note of how many of them, especially the detectives, were members of the local Army Intelligence reserve units, as well as whether they were JBS, KKK, etc. 

One other thing Id like to point out. Cops always rally around their own. That is the best explanation for the lack of dissenting voices. As far as I recall there was only one cop who dissented from the nearly lock step testimony of the rest - Deputy Sheriff Craig. He is worth paying attention to if only because it takes guts to do what he did. 

 

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11 hours ago, Paul Trejo said:

...

 Here's my initial list:

Sheriff Bill Decker

Deputy Eugene Boone

Deputy Luke Mooney

Deputy Buddy Walthers

Constable Seymour Weitzman

 

...

 

Paul, the work below is really for my own notes but I'll just post it here.  This is my review of DPD officer Adamcik, DPD jailer Ables, and Dallas Sheriff's deputy Boone.   I'm only concentrating on their WC testimony for now; later I/we can track done anything else they've said or other connections they have.

Jailer Don Ables provides nothing useful as he was only a mannequin used in the lineup with Oswald.  For the conspiracy-minded, there are several minor points to look at involving Boone and Adamcik, but I'll stick to just three points for now.   

  1. Deputy Boone says he had no assignment whatsoever on 22 November.  Is this plausible?  With the president in town?  He says he was just milling around Dealey Plaza.  He says everyone thought shots came from the triple overpass, so he ran up there immediately --- and the area behind the picket fence, by the train tracks, adjacent to the triple overpass, was flooded with DPD officers.   He claims not to know who sent him or why he was sent to the TSBD, and furthermore doesn't know who sent him or why he was sent specifically to the 6th floor.  He says he discovered "the" rifle.  Boone is a little fishy to me.   He was obviously sent to the 6th floor, but can't explain who sent him or why.
  2. DPD detective John Adamcik has a longer testimony because he is tasked with gathering evidence from the Paine's on 22 November.  This is a 2-3 day process.  Unclear is how they got Ruth Paine's address and why an empty blanket rolled up in the garage attracts so much attention.  Why focus on a blanket roll?
  3. Adamcik's story of how the famous backyard photo was found is murky murky murky!   Ruth was away when it was found, and no one from the Paine house saw the photo until it was shown back at police headquarters - according to Adamcik.  Adamcik may or may not be fishy because he seems to be the junior officer of ~4 tasked to the Irving part of the investigation.

All the officers are YOUNG and not exactly well educated.   DPD isn't recruiting from Ivy League schools.  Possibly also questionable is the officers who give key testimony but claim they had no assignment for the president's visit and seem to be generally unoccupied with much of anything.

 

Police and Sheriff testimony in the Warren Commission

Don R. Ables: Mid-20s; civilian employee of the DPD as a jail clerk with 7 months experience.  HS dropout; 7 years in the Navy. Only obvious relevance is his role as a participant in the 22 November identity lineups with Oswald, presumably in front of witnesses.   Ables testifies that using jail employees is normal and that he was dressed in unremarkable dark slacks, grey sweater, white shirt.

 

John P Adamcik: 26, claims he got as far as high school; then went to the DPD after a hardship discharge from the Marine Corps.  He is now a detective at a young age. Off duty at time of assassination, with a scheduled shift starting at 3.   Comes in early to work when he hears of the shooting, arriving at about 2.  Was in the DPD office less than hour before Oswald brought on.  Tasked by Captain Fritz with driving out to the Paine residence in Irving.  Denies any knowledge of how they obtained the Paine’s address of 2515 West Fifth Street, Irving.  After this question officer Adamcik asks to use his official report while giving testimony.  Drives with DPD Detectives Rose and Stovall, meets sheriff’s deputies in front of house.   Ruth Paine is friendly and invites them in; giving permission to look around.  Meets Marina.  Claims Ruth Paine directed detectives Rose and Stovall to the garage.  DPD HQ instructs officers to bring in Ruth and Marina for questioning, but there is concern over what should happen with the children.  Michael Paine shows up while the police are at Ruth’s house.

[Ruth’s?] children are given to the neighbors, but Marina brings her children with her to the police station. Michael Paine is asked why he shows up and according to DPD officer Adamcik, Paine says he heard about the shooting at the TSBD and assumed Oswald would be a prime suspect.

A rolled up blanked is found in the garage by Rose and Stovall.

Linnie Mae Randle drives up and informs Adamcik that Oswald rode in to work today with her brother, Buell Frazier.  Randle also tells Adamcik that she saw Oswald walking across the lawn that morning with a long parcel wrapped in “something.”  Randle says it is unusual for Oswald to stay Thursday nights in Irving.

Marina and Ruth are brought to DPD headquarters for questioning.  They try to find an interpreter for Marina.  Marina allegedly says the rifle she is shown looks like Oswald’s rifle.   Adamcik says Captain Fritz and Detective Senkel are in charge of the questioning.  Marguerite Oswald is also there for questioning.  Robert Oswald was there as well, for questioning.

Officer Adamcik says he was briefly tasked with talking to Oswald while Captain Fritz was away, but has no record of the conversation.  Adamcik remembers that Oswald said he did not drive and spent “about 2 years” in Russia.

Adamcik was sent home about 2am (now early on 23 November), and came back in later that day about 10am.  Captain Fritz tasked him, and detectives Rose, Moore, and Stovall to go back to the Paine house with a search warrant.  Ruth Paine is again fully cooperative.  Adamcik says camera equipment or film projector were seized the previous day.  Detective McCabe, of the Irving PD, joins them on the 23rd for the 2nd search of the Paine house.

Adamcik says he was in the garage when “someone else” found a photo of Oswald with a rifle.  It was allegedly said that this photo shows a gun that looks like the rifle used in the assassination.  The photo was found without anyone but police officers at the home as everyone else had gone grocery shopping.  The photo was NOT shown to Marina or the Paines at the house, but rather at DPD headquarters.

On a subsequent day they went back to get an affidavit from Michael Paine, who had not signed one previously. Adamcik says Paine remembers handling a rolled blanket several times, thinking it was tenting poles.  Paine also says he doubts Oswald was the assassin, although he (Paine) assumed Oswald would be a top suspect.

 

 

Eugene Boone: 26, Dallas sheriff’s deputy with 1.5 years experience; HS Education, no special assignment 22 November, just hanging out watching the parade with sheriff department staff.  Boone says most witnesses thought bullets from triple underpass.  Deputy Boone and lots of Dallas city cops went over the fence and behind a concrete mixing area to search around the railroad tracks.  He then went to the TSBD's 6th floor.  Boone could not explain who told him to go to TSBD and then who told him to go to 6th floor.  Deputy Boone says he started searching from the east end of the 6th floor with the help of a flashlight.  Boone then says near the west wall, 3 feet from the stairwell, he finds “the” rifle “stuffed down between two rows of boxes with another box or so pulled over the top of it.” 

Captain Fritz was already on the floor, so Fritz was called over when Boone discovered a rifle.   Boone  confirms WC Exhibits (photos) 514, 515, 516, & 517 show how the gun and boxes were found. Marks arrows on 515 & 516 (see below) indicating where he found “the” rifle.  Boone says the rifle is found at 1:22 and there is a filming news crew present.   The DPD officers are said to be in charge of the scene, specifically Captain Fritz.   Boone confirms again the location of the rifle in the Northwest corner using a floor plan, CE 483, to illustrate his point.  WC member Senator Cooper re-directs testimony to the moment Deputy Boone jumped over the retaining wall.  Boone says there were people to the south on the Triple underpass, who he says were watching the motorcade and that a DPD officer went that direction.   WC attorney Ball asks Boone why he initially called the rifle a 7.65 Mauser, but Boone says it was actually DPD Captain Fritz who called it a Mauser.

 

Captain Fritz is the central controller of all the cops, it seems to me, giving very specific instructions.

 

*   *   *

Warren Commission Exhibit 483 - a floorplan of the TSBD 6th floor, rifle found at 36

 

ce483.jpg


 

Warren Commission Exhibits 517, 516, 515, 514
ce517.jpg
ce516.jpg
ce515.jpg
ce514.jpg

Edited by Jason Ward
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Jason,

Thanks for the overview of these Dallas police.    If you take this same approach with all your 91 Dallas Law Enforcement employess however -- in alphabetical order -- I submit that your overview will not catch the correct nuances.    You are likely focus on some irrelevant things, and to possibly skip over some crucial things.

I hope I am not being too harsh is my advice here.   The alphabetical approach is not the best approach.   While it does guarantee that nobody will be overlooked, there are other ways to do that -- and better ways.

One can take the same list of people and group them into categories before beginning.   The first category that I would choose is this one:  Of these 91 employees  of Dallas Law Enforcement -- which ones were present at Dealey Plaza, and which ones were not?

Also, of those who were present at Dealey Plaza, which ones were present at the moment of the JFK shooting, and which came at other times?

Also -- of those present at Dealey Plaza -- which ones were on the 6th floor of the TSBD around the time that the Manlicher-Carcano rifle was found?   When did they arrive?  In what order?   Under what circumstances?

You have already touched on this last question, Jason, yet you have only begun your alphabetic system, and it will take some time before you get around to Buddy Walthers, a central figure, whose last name starts with "W"..

Can we please group your 91 names first, before walking through their WC testimony?    Otherwise we risk dragging on without rich fruit.

Here is a first clue -- it was the Sheriff Deputies who were the first on the scene at the Grassy Knoll, and the first on the scene in the TSBD, and they were the ones who found Oswald's alleged rifle.   Buddy Walthers was in some ways their leader.   Buddy Walthers also led the team to Ruth Paine's house.

Buddy Walthers also told the fabrication that Ruth Paine's garage had "six or seven filing cabinets full of the name of Castro supporters."   He was clearly trying to implicate the Paine's as Communist supporters of Lee Harvey Oswald.   This is significant, IMHO.

Here's my opening count.   Of these 91 names, there were 58 Law Enforcement officers at Dealey Plaza.    So, where were they all standing or sitting when the JFK Assassination occurred?   What was their post?

Another question I have -- there were two Dallas Police working as foot patrol next to the TSBD building.   Four eye-witnesses next to the TSBD building reported seeing rifles sticking out of high story windows, and men with guns walking around high story windows.   Some told police.  Yet those police on foot patrol around the TSBD testified to the WC that they themselves saw nothing suspicious in those windows.

It's those who were PRESENT at Dealey Plaza that should get first priority, IMHO.    The alphabetic system is too slow, IMHO.

Best regards,
--Paul 

Edited by Paul Trejo
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6 minutes ago, Paul Trejo said:

: ..

Of these 91 employees  of Dallas Law Enforcement -- which ones were present at Dealey Plaza, and which ones were not?

...

It's those who were PRESENT at Dealey Plaza that should get first priority, IMHO.    The alphabetic system is too slow, IMHO.

...

Best regards,
--Paul 

Hi Paul, 

Thanks for your reply . 

Sure, we can look at the officers and deputies present Dealey Plaza first.

Like prosecutors and defendants in the trial , those who have adopted a CT want to present the strongest evidence first, while those who are against the CT want a totally different order to the evidence presented.   The order and packaging of the evidence makes a big impact, so my natural approach is to choose some arbitrary or neutral order in looking at evidence.  However, since your idea about looking at peace officers present in Dealey Plaza does not seem to favor or disfavor any particular CT, that's fine . 

 

Jason

 

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7 minutes ago, Jason Ward said:

Hi Paul, 

Thanks for your reply . 

Sure, we can look at the officers and deputies present Dealey Plaza first.

Like prosecutors and defendants in the trial , those who have adopted a CT want to present the strongest evidence first, while those who are against the CT want a totally different order to the evidence presented.   The order and packaging of the evidence makes a big impact, so my natural approach is to choose some arbitrary or neutral order in looking at evidence.  However, since your idea about looking at peace officers present in Dealey Plaza does not seem to favor or disfavor any particular CT, that's fine . 

Jason

Thanks, Jason.   I appreciate this.

--Paul

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This thread appears to be largely a private conversation between Jason and Paul T. You consistently ignore my posts and questions, especially Jason. Why?

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Here are just a few entertaining words about Dallas Sheriff Bill Decker, who was riding in the lead car along with DPD Chief Jesse Curry and Dallas Secret Service agent Forrest Sorrels at the time of the JFK Assassination.   

Oddly, Bill Decker's WC testimony speaks almost entirely about Jack Ruby killing Oswald -- and not about the Dealey Plaza killing of JFK.   So, his WC testimony isn't going to be very helpful in grasping the Dealey Plaza episode.

Still, it may be interesting to read about the man himself.   Bill Decker was 65 at the time of the  JFK parade.  Already famous as the lawman who had chased Bonnie and Clyde, he was now facing retirement.

Bill Decker had his own CT -- as told in 1971 by Gareth (Gary) Wean , a Los Angeles cop, a detective.   Gary wrote that in December, 1963, he got a call from his older pal, Bill Decker.   Bill grew up in Texas with a now-famous Hollywood actor named Audie Murphy -- a WW2 war hero.  Bill invite Gary and Audie to join him at a private dinner party in New Mexico with Texas Senator John Tower.   

The Senator wanted to share with these trusted men a fascinating secret.

According to Gary, the eminent Senator Tower told the party that he knew who had killed JFK.   E.Howard Hunt, he said, was the manager of Lee Harvey Oswald.   Hunt had an idea of Oswald helping with a fake assassination attempt on JFK, to frame Fidel Castro. 

Oswald’s visit to the Cuban Embassy in Mexico City was part of Hunt's plan of laying a trail to Cuba.  The intent was to scare the American people into supporting an invasion of Cuba. 

This plot was unknown to the White House, but allegedly known to the CIA, to the Pentagon, and to a few Senators like himself, said Senator Tower (according to Gary Wean).  Since so many high-level people were involved, Oswald agreed to do it.  The plan was that Oswald would fire his rifle into the air, and then go into hiding, and after Cuba was invaded and liberated, Oswald would come home to a hero’s welcome and a full-time job.

However -- some bad guys infiltrated Hunt's plan.  They killed JFK.  Then they tried to kill Oswald.  Tippit got in the way and was killed by the JFK assassins, not Oswald.  Soon however, Oswald himself was dead.

This was the CT that (according to Gary Wean) Dallas Sheriff Bill Decker believed until he died in 1970.   After he died, Gary Wean believed it was safe to tell his story to the world. 

Regards,
--Paul Trejo

Edited by Paul Trejo
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10 minutes ago, Paul Brancato said:

This thread appears to be largely a private conversation between Jason and Paul T. You consistently ignore my posts and questions, especially Jason. Why?

Paul B., 

Your CIA-did-it bias is overbearing and you feel free to insult people.   This thread attempts to be open-minded and academic.  We are going to evaluate WC evidence of Dallas Police without preconceptions.    Your overbearing attitude (due to your dogma) and your insulting are out of place on this thread.

Well -- you wanted an honest answer, didn't you?

Regards,
--Paul Trejo

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Really Paul? I'm insulting? Every time you say I am dogmatically attached to a CIA did it theory it s an insult. You accuse me of not understanding nuance. How about you? 

Questions I've asked on this thread alone include asking for exploration of Souetre visiting New Orleans, Banister aiding an OAS operation, the affiliations of DPD with Army Intelligence and KKK. Where do you see CIA in my questions and comments? 

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  • Paul Trejo changed the title to General Walker, Lee Harvey Oswald and Dallas Officials

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