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General Walker, Lee Harvey Oswald and Dallas Officials


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58 minutes ago, Paul Brancato said:

Really Paul? I'm insulting? Every time you say I am dogmatically attached to a CIA did it theory it s an insult. You accuse me of not understanding nuance. How about you? 

Questions I've asked on this thread alone include asking for exploration of Souetre visiting New Orleans, Banister aiding an OAS operation, the affiliations of DPD with Army Intelligence and KKK. Where do you see CIA in my questions and comments? 

Paul B,

I've been on this Forum for over 6 years, and in that time your posts to me have largely been insulting and disruptive.   That's what I remember.   Not that you're unintelligent -- but you have this anti-Trejo attitude which you bandy about like a flag.  I have every right to set your Forum account to IGNORE.  But I'll give you one more chance.   If you continue to insult me or try to disrupt the orderly and academic intent of this thread, I will stop responding to you.

This thread is about General Walker and Lee Harvey Oswald.   It presumes Jim Garrison's facts about New Orleans, without accepting Garrison's CT about CIA control -- which he never proved.   Lee Oswald was working for Guy Banister in New Orleans.  Lee didn't know the full story.

The relationship of Walker does, therefore, include actual evidence about Guy Banister, and his Radical Right politics, including his helping an OAS operation in its struggle against Cuba, as well as his cooperation with the KKK and even with George Lincoln Rockwell and the American Nazi Party.   

Guy Banister was, like General Walker, a dedicated advocate for the racial segregation of US public schools.   Period.   He regarded all race-mixing as Communism.   He was relentless.

It is also admitted by  former FBI agent, William Turner (Power on the Right, 1971) that the Dallas Police Department in the 1960's was so friendly to the KKK that several members of the Dallas Police force were also KKK members.     

That has all been documented -- and I have agreed with these facts as long as I have written on this Forum.   

William Turner also said that the Dallas Police were regularly recruited from veterans of the US Army, the US Navy, the US Air Force, US Marines, and the Military Reserves.   For this reason, they tended to be very close with the local Military organizations, and to have personal relationships with people in high places in the Military -- old friends --- who would still go hunting with each other, and engage in target practice.    Also, many of these people, with their Western "rifle culture" -- would join groups like the "Minutemen".

General Walker was a former General in the US Army.   For many of these advocates of the US Military, there was a subculture of extremist Anticommunism, and also of sympathy for General Walker and the way he was treated by the Kennedy Administration.   Even though the majority of Americans (and even Dallas) may have thought that General Walker was a loony tune out on the fringes of politics -- there was always a minority who said that he was their Leader.

According to James Hosty, General Walker was the leader of the Dallas "Minutemen," and according to William Turner, some of these "Minutemen" were also Dallas policemen.    Jeff Caufield makes a further connection.   General Walker was a leader of his local John Birch Society which met on weekends at "Austin's BBQ" in Dallas.   Officer JD Tippit was a regular figure on those weekends there at "Austin's BBQ".

Regards,
--Paul Trejo

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  • On ‎3‎/‎16‎/‎2018 at 7:59 AM, Paul Trejo said:
    • Jason,
    • You've got a fairly complete list here -- and obviously it's too large, at 91 names.   So, let's whittle it down.
    • ...
    •  So, this is the place to start, in my opinion.   Here's my initial list:
    •  
    • Deputy Eugene Boone
    • ...

    •  
    •  
    • Also, let's save Bill Decker for last, because his WC testimony almost entirely bypasses the JFK assassination, and concentrates
  •  

Ok, Paul, I've posted my impressions of Sheriff's Deputy Eugene Boone's testimony to the WC above.  What do you think?  

  • A procedural concern I have is the fact that he has a very short testimony and was allowed to give his narrative without anything like a challenge or cross examination.  One of the great benefits to the conspirators of eliminating Oswald was that the adversarial system of criminal proceedings in our country was rendered moot.   There was no attorney and no other interested party around to challenge witnesses; to make them pin down details; to point out ambiguities, and so forth.  Normally, depositions are conducted with OPPOSING counsels present to prevent witnesses from just advertising an unchallenged comfortable version of events. 
  • What we have isn't much more than asking Boone to type up a story.  When my chain of command asks me for a report, I don't emphasize my own mistakes, shortcomings, or flat out incompetence, do you?  So, Boone told his story as we all would - in a way that makes us look good.  He was not made to answer for anything that in retrospect seems questionable because this was an effort in just letting a witness speak unchallenged.  As for the SUBSTANCE of his testimony:
  •  
  1. the overriding question I have is who was directing his actions and why he did what he did.   He says he initially followed the crowd's assumption that there was firing from the grassy knoll, which caused him to surmount the retaining wall and do who-knows-what in the train track area.   Next he is in the TSBD and 6th Floor but who knows why he went there and who told him to go there?
  2. The story around finding the gun, identifying the gun, and Captain Fritz is just very neat and undetailed.   There's all kinds of holes here, but, way too late now to challenge him.

I'll look at some more sheriff department testimony today and post impressions.  Thoughts on Boone's testimony?

 

 

Jason

 

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On 3/16/2018 at 7:59 AM, Paul Trejo said:

Jason,

You've got a fairly complete list here -- and obviously it's too large, at 91 names.   So, let's whittle it down.

...

   So, this is the place to start, in my opinion.   Here's my initial list:

...

Deputy Luke Mooney

...

 

 

 

 

Police and Sheriff Testimony in the Warren Commission Part 2: Dallas County Sheriff's Deputy Luke Mooney

LUKE MOONEY: 40, five years as a Dallas County Sheriff's deputy; 10 years experience working for a car dealer as a shop dispatcher, 4 years in the army during WW2.  Primary duties are serving and enforcing civil writs from civil court cases.  Had no assigned duty on 22 November, 1963.  Watched the motorcade in front of the courthouse at 505 Main St.   Mooney says deputy Boone [see above], deputy Hiram Ingram and deputy Ralph Waters were all standing near him.

Upon hearing shots, Mooney says he immediately ran at full speed over the concrete retaining wall into the area of the railroad tracks.  He thought the shots came from the direction of the railroad tracks [deputy Boone goes there as well for the same reason].  Mooney testifies he found "nothing" there, except one car, occupied by an African American porter.   He says there were lots of officers and spectators around.

Deputy Mooney says he was in the area of the railroad tracks a "few seconds" when another officer by word of mouth relayed orders from Dallas County Sheriff Bill Decker.  The orders were to "cover" the TSBD.  At this point Deputy Ralph Waters disappears and is not seen until later by Mooney.   Deputies Vickery and Webster join the narrative and these three deputies try to block the iron gates on the ground floor of the TSBD.  He put an unknown civilian in charge of guarding these gates assuming a uniformed officer would take over later.

Mooney then enters the TSBD via the back door.  He decides to use the freight elevator (for unknown reasons?  and where's he going?) as deputies Vickery and Webster take the stairs.  Two unknown females join Mooney on the elevator and everyone gets off on the 2nd floor.  Mooney then proceeds via stairs to the 6th floor.  He passes many deputies coming down the stairs saying "and how come I got off on the sixth floor, I don't know yet."

WC lawyer Ball asks why Mooney went to the 6th floor.  Mooney denies knowing why he went to the 6th floor.

Deputy Mooney begins "crisscrossing" the floor but says he sees no one else.  He decides to go to the 7th floor and meets up with deputies Webster and Vickery.  Mooney says deputies Boone and Walters had now "gone after the lights," because it was dark on the 7th floor.

An unknown press photographer is roaming around with a camera on these floors.

For again unknown reasons, Mooney now goes to the 6th floor, and encounters no one, he says. By wondering around with no apparent direction, Deputy Mooney says he found expended shell casings adjacent to boxes stacked up in a way to facilitate shooting a rifle.  Mooney offers that there is a crease in one of the boxes which would have been where the "rifle could have lain" at the same "angle that the shots were fired from."  Mooney says he then leaned out the window, "the same window from which the shots were fired," and saw DPD Captain Fritz chatting with Dallas Sherriff Bill Decker on the ground below.  He tells them he's discovered the crime scene and requests "crime lab officers."

It is now 1:00, according to Mooney, and he is standing guard in the southeast corner of the TSBD's 6th floor, standing guard over the shell casings and creased box he discovered.....

Continued below

 

Again, a sheriff deputy shows up on the 6th floor but doesn't know why.

 

 

 

 

 

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Police and Sheriff Testimony in the Warren Commission Part 2: Dallas County Sheriff's Deputy Luke Mooney (continued from previous post)

 

...Mooney says deputies Vickery, Webster, and McCurley are with him on the 6th floor as he is guarding the crime scene.  Mooney is shown Commission Exhibit 508 & 509  (see below) by WC attorney Ball.  Mooney confirms that these pictures show how the boxes were arranged.  There is some discussion about the crease in the boxes.  Exhibit 510 is shown to Mooney (see below) and identifies shell casings he says he found.  Mooney volunteers that he assumes this is from the first shot.

Mooney says Captain Fritz then scooped up the shell casings, which were too far away for Mooney to identify by size.  There is further discussion around the shell casings and arrangement of the boxes as Mooney says there seems to be slight differences between his memory and what is indicated in the pictures.

Exhibit 513 (see below) is shown to Deputy Mooney and the discussion suddenly changes to the location of  a found chicken bone.  Mooney says he saw a chicken bone and a paper bag, on top of a box.  Mooney saw no Dr Pepper or any other soft drink container.

Exhibit 484 is shown to Deputy Mooney.  He says the 6th floor was "covered with officers," searching for "the" weapon, and that we was on the 6th floor for not longer than 20 minutes.  Mooney says he was 15 steps at most away from Deputy Boone when Boone announced he had found the gun.  Mooney denies handling the shell casings or the chicken bones.

Senator Cooper asks Mooney if there was any odor in the area; Mooney at first replies "no," but then adds that there "could have been" a powder smell on 6th floor.  Exhibit 514 is shown to Mooney, followed by 515.  Mooney confirms the pictures show how the gun was found.

Deputy Mooney says there were a number of unidentified photographers on the 6th floor, who he assumed were the press.

Mooney says the gun was found "clear across" the building from the shells.  The shells were in the southeast corner, the gun in the northwest corner.

========================================================================================

My concerns from the testimony of Deputy Luke Mooney:

  1. How does Mooney know to go to the 6th floor?
  2. Where is the Dr Pepper?
  3. Who are the photographers on the 6th floor and where are their pictures?
  4. Did Mooney in effect leave a TSBD exit unguarded by putting an unknown civilian in charge of the iron gates?
  5. Are the paper sack and chicken bones assigned by Mooney to the SE corner, aka the "assassin's lair," ?
  6. Is Mooney's story consistent with Boone's?

CE 484

ce484.jpg

 

CE515
ce515.jpg

 

CE514
ce514.jpg

 

CE513
ce513.jpg

 

CE510
ce510.jpg

 

CE 509
ce509.jpg

 

CE 508
ce508.jpg

 

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10 hours ago, Jason Ward said:
  •  

OK, Paul, I've posted my impressions of Sheriff's Deputy Eugene Boone's testimony to the WC above.  What do you think?  

  • A procedural concern I have is the fact that he has a very short testimony and was allowed to give his narrative without anything like a challenge or cross examination.  One of the great benefits to the conspirators of eliminating Oswald was that the adversarial system of criminal proceedings in our country was rendered moot.   There was no attorney and no other interested party around to challenge witnesses; to make them pin down details; to point out ambiguities, and so forth.  Normally, depositions are conducted with OPPOSING counsels present to prevent witnesses from just advertising an unchallenged comfortable version of events. 
  • What we have isn't much more than asking Boone to type up a story.  When my chain of command asks me for a report, I don't emphasize my own mistakes, shortcomings, or flat out incompetence, do you?  So, Boone told his story as we all would - in a way that makes us look good.  He was not made to answer for anything that in retrospect seems questionable because this was an effort in just letting a witness speak unchallenged.  As for the SUBSTANCE of his testimony:
  •  
  1. the overriding question I have is who was directing his actions and why he did what he did.   He says he initially followed the crowd's assumption that there was firing from the grassy knoll, which caused him to surmount the retaining wall and do who-knows-what in the train track area.   Next he is in the TSBD and 6th Floor but who knows why he went there and who told him to go there?
  2. The story around finding the gun, identifying the gun, and Captain Fritz is just very neat and undetailed.   There's all kinds of holes here, but, way too late now to challenge him.

I'll look at some more sheriff department testimony today and post impressions.  Thoughts on Boone's testimony?

Jason

Jason,

Thanks for your hard work summarizing all this WC data on Deputy Boone.  Here are my opinions:

(1) The fact of Boone's short WC testimony, practically a narrative, like a story, is way too common in the WC volumes to be of much concern, IMHO.

(1.1)  The WC did not conduct a Trial by any stretch.  They only conducted a Hearing, which was guaranteed only by the Legal Oath.  

(1.2)  The WC did not take into consideration any amount of Southern hostility towards Northern Yankees in general, or toward Supreme Court Justice Earl Warren (author of the Brown Decision to racially integrate all US public schools) in particular. 

(1.3)  In my opinion, most residents of Dallas were sympathetic to the Confederate Flag and its conservative tendency, and opposed to the Supreme Court and its liberal tendency.  The "Warren Commission" sounded noble to Yankees, but sounded like shxx to Southerners.

(1.4) There was never any WC cross-examination of any Dallas Law officers.  The only thing that sounded like WC cross-examination was directed to Marina Oswald and to Ruth Paine -- the two people who knew the very least about the JFK Assassination.  They had to endure thousands and thousands of WC questions -- literally.

(2.0)  As for SUBSTANCE.  The answer regarding why Boone did what he did will come when we examine all of the Dallas Sheriff Deputies.  Especially Buddy Walthers.  

(2.1)  I think a case can be made that Buddy Walthers was the leader on the ground.  He leads the leap over the picket fence.  He claims that he was the one who first ordered people to pile into the TSBD building. 

(2.2)  The story about finding the gun is so neat and uniform by all the Deputies and Policemen on the 6th floor of the TSBD that one can make a case that they coordinated their statements before they took the WC stand.

All best,
--Paul

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Jason, 

Here's my feedback on all your hard work on the WC testimony of Dallas Deputy Sheriff Luke Mooney:

1. Deputy Mooney, with many Dallas Deputies on 11/22/1963, was standing outside their building door on the corner of Main and Houston, overlooking Dealey Plaza. 

2.  There are two reasons that Deputies give for running toward the railroad tracks:

2.1.  That they heard shots from there;

2.2.  That Sheriff Bill Decker ordered them all to go there, because he was afraid that the Dallas Police would take too long to get there.

2.3.  We have the radio transmission record from Sheriff Bill Decker that confirms this order.

3.  Many Dallas Deputies ran as fast as they could to the picket fence of Dealey Plaza.  

3.1.  Since that was only about a half-block away from their place of employment, many of them ran that distance in perhaps 30 seconds or less.   

3.2.  Thus, many of them claim that they were there "within seconds."  I believe them.

4.  I agree with your emphasis, Jason, that the only thing they saw when they got there (aside from obvious spectators) were Dallas policemen.   

4.1. That is important, in my humble opinion, because these same Dallas policemen shot JFK.  The Deputies knew this, but they also knew that nobody in Dallas (or the USA) would doubt a policeman (or wonder why a policeman had a weapon).

4.2.  Again, why did they run to the TSBD?   Did Bill Decker give that order?  He was not in Dealey Plaza at that time, and there is no radio transmission record to confirm this, IIRC.

4.3.  Deputy Buddy Walthers claims it was his order.   (He was not alone in this boast, however.)

5.  When we finally piece together all of the WC testimony from all of the Sheriff Deputies, we will find a fairly consistent story -- with minor deviations (mostly from Deputy Roger Craig).

6.  The question of arriving at the 6th floor is interesting.  

6.1.   Amos Euins and other Dealey Plaza witnesses told Dallas policemen as early as one minute after the JFK Assassination that they saw men with guns on the upper floors of the TSBD.   

6.2.  When did Dallas officers actually arrive on the 6th floor?  Long after the eye-witnesses spoke up.

7.  It is absolutely riveting that Deputy Luke Mooney had no clue WHY he went to the 6th floor.  That is covering up a Big Secret, in my opinion.   

7.1.  The Big Secret is easy to guess -- namely -- that all the Deputy stories were coordinated in advance -- and in this case, Luke Mooney could SIMPLY NOT REMEMBER WHAT THE GROUP STORY WAS!

8.  As for the phrase,"gone for the lights," Mooney is speaking of a walk back to the County Jail to get lots of flashlights.   

8.1.  Deputy Roger Craig claims he was also part of this walk -- but his participation will be denied by others.  This is part of a crack in the Deputy's story.

9. In my humble opinion, Luke Mooney does not FIND shell casings, but he PLACES shell casings on the floor.

9.1.  (Evidence for my claim comes from doubts expressed by Deputy Roger Craig.  We will see that as we explore all of the WC evidence from all of the Dallas Sheriff Deputies.) 

10.  It is now 1pm, you said.  One half-hour after the JFK Assassination.  

10.1.  Is Deputy Mooney realy standing guard as he claims?  Or framing the crime scene?

11.  Finally Captain Bill Fritz and Sherriff Bill Decker arrive together, and chat on the street below the TSBD.  

12.  Deputy Mooney claims that he discovered the crime scene and requested "crime lab officers."

12.1.  We will see that he was not the only one to make that boast.

13.  As for the chicken bones -- I see no reason to belabor them -- they belonged to the lunch of one of the workers at the TSBD, who would admit this in his WC testimony.  

13.1.  I see very little use in discussion of a Dr. Pepper, Coke or other soft drink.  

13.2.  There were so many workers in the TSBD 5th and 6th floors on Thursday and Friday, that sack lunches are irrelevant, IMHO.

14.  As for your CONCERNS:

14.1.  Mooney's story suggests that he selected the 6th floor by the luck of the draw, so to speak.  Other officers were on other floors, so he went to the 6th floor.  

14.1.1.  What confuses me is how Deputy Mooney could be ALONE on the 6th floor long enough to allegedly FIND the shell casings.   I doubt that part.

14.2.  I don't care about the Dr. Pepper that other witnesses may have found.  If it's important I'd like to know why.  

14.2.1. Also, in common parlance, some people called *any* soda pop a "Coke."  

14.2.2.  Even if it was an orange drink, or a lemon-lime drink, to some people it was still a "Coke," which was synonymous with a "pop".  So, I don't focus on these Southern colloquialisms.

14.2.3.  I am not concerned with any soda can or lunch sack or its contents.  It is irrelevant to me, UNLESS IT CAN BE USED TO SHOW THAT THE DEPUTIES ARE LYING IN SOME WAY.

14.3.  I am not concerned with the identity of press photographers -- though perhaps I should be.

14.3.1.  I presume that a flood of press photographers had simply followed a flood of policemen into the TSBD by 12:45 PM, having found nothing suspicious behind the picket fence of the Grassy Knoll.

14.3.2.  What really worries me is Deputy Mooney's narrative that suggests he was ALONE on the 6th floor at the time that other Deputies were walkig to the County Jailhouse to get flashlights to explore the 7th floor.   That sounds utterly impossible to me.  There had to be others.

14.3.3.  I don't know where their pictures are, however -- and I feel that somebody should know.  

14.3.4.  Yet if they were simply random pictures of a warehouse, with random pictures of boxes, then why would any newspaper editor even bother with them?   They were probably trashed.  

14.3.5.  The Dallas Police had their own photographers, who had rules about quality of their photographs -- and they didn't care about newspaper photographs (unless people higher up in the chain of command cared about them).

14.4.  IMHO, in those days, if a Dallas Policeman ordered a civilian to do something, that civilian was morally obliged to do it.  Even to guard a door.

14.4.1.   We will see later that other Dallas authorities disputed the status and security of the entrances and exits of the TSBD building.   In any case, 12:45 was way too late to worry about the escape of a 12:30 sniper.

14.5.  Again, I'm unconcerned with Bonnie Ray Williams' chicken lunch remains on the 6th floor.
 
14.6.  I find Mooney's story acceptably consistent with Boone's, if only because Boone's story is so skinny -- so lacking in details.

All best,
--Paul

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On 3/16/2018 at 12:51 PM, Lawrence Schnapf said:

Paul- you have it backwards in many ways

...Marina is the only person who could tie LHO to possessing the rifle, to the note that was allegedly written before the Walker shooting, to what he told her when he came back, to the presence of the rifle in the blanket. How do you know she was not lying about these facts?

The WC called her four times because of its frustration with her evolving testimony. this is documented in Shennon's book and staff memos of Willens. As Casey Stengel used to say "You can look it up"    

Lawrence,

I've read all of Marina's WC testimony, which is a heck of a lot of reading, since she was asked thousands of questions, and it runs into hundreds of pages.

But it's worth it.   Yes, she was called back several times -- but Ruth Paine was also called back several times -- and that meant nothing at all.    In my opinion (which many on this Form will challenge) Ruth Paine is one of the most honest people one could ever meet.   She remains true to her Quaker religion to this very day.   She took Marina Oswald into her home when Marina was eight months pregnant, and had no health insurance or money, and Lee Oswald had no job.

Yet Ruth Paine had to endure more than FIVE THOUSAND QUESTIONS from the Warren Commission.  That's not an exaggeration, that's more questions than anybody else.   Regarding Lee Harvey Oswald (and excluding Jack Ruby testimony) Marina Oswald was second only to Ruth in the number of questions asked.

And yet, these two women knew less about the JFK Assassination than anybody else in the world.   They knew about Lee Harvey Oswald, but he kept tons of secrets from them.   Well, for one thing, they were "only women" and this was 1963 in Texas -- and these women had babies to take care of, which was their "natural business."   

So, Lee Harvey Oswald told Marina Oswald nothing -- or worse than nothing -- he told her outright lies on a continual basis.

In any case -- Marina Oswald told the TRUTH to the WC after she took the Oath.   If that TRUTH was sometimes contradicted by others (for example, George De Mohrenschildt) it was not only Marina Oswald who was called back by the WC attorneys (but George De Mohrenschildt would also be called back).

The WC got their answers.   

There is another reason that Marina was called back -- she didn't speak English well enough.   In fact, although she volunteered to answer herself, the WC decided that her English was too broken.  So they chose to speak to Marina through a Russian expert, and to get Marina's answers only from this Russian expert.

So, in addition to her language issues, we also have to include the third party of this Russian expert, and his accent, and his lack of knowledge of American colloquialisms.

For just one example:  the Russian word for "bury" also means "hide."   So, in Russian, Marina would say that Lee Harvey Oswald "hid" his rifle.  This came out in the WC record from the Russian expert that Lee Harvey Oswald "buried" his rifle.   See the problems?   This is the tip of the iceberg.

No wonder Marina had to be called back so many times.

Yet I will stand by this -- Ruth Paine and Marina Oswald told the 100% truth to the Warren Commission.   If somebody wishes to challenge my claim -- I don't want anymore abstract theories.   Just show me the exact WC testimony that you believe is a LIE, and I will respond to that.   I've read all of Marina's WC material.

Regards,
--Paul Trejo

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On 3/16/2018 at 7:59 AM, Paul Trejo said:

Jason,

You've got a fairly complete list here -- and obviously it's too large, at 91 names.   So, let's whittle it down.

...

Constable Seymour Weitzman

 

...

 

Police and Sheriff testimony in the Warren Commission Part 3: Constable Seymour Weitzman

 

Seymour Weitzman: Dallas County deputy constable for 3 years; engineering college graduate, 15 years previous experience supervising retail dress stores.   On 22 November he is standing at the corner of Main and Houston with deputy constable Bill Hutton.  Like Boone and Mooney, Weitzman runs to and jumps the retaining wall towards the railroad track area because “somebody said” that’s where the shots came from.  Claims he burned his hands climbing the wall because he grabbed steampipes (!)(???).   Notices “numerous kinds of footprints that did not make sense.”  Claims other officers and Secret Service were in the train tracks area.  “Somebody” hands him a piece of the president's skull found in the street.

The narrative suddenly jumps to the TSBD with no explanation as to why he went there or who told him to go there.

Weitzman says he searches floor to floor starting from the first floor.  When he arrives at the 6th floor, a sheriff’s deputy was “in charge” and “wanted the floor torn apart.”   “He wanted the gun and it was there somewhere.”   Weitzman says he and deputy Boone discovered “the” gun and that it well hidden, so well hidden that it was probably undiscovered by the first “eight or nine” officers who looked in the same area.  A “man-tight” barricade was made to protect the gun until the crime lab was to come for it, Weitzman says.    He does not see Captain Fritz handle the gun.

Suddenly, the narrative says Weitzman returned to his office..

Weitzman is shown pictures by WC attorney Ball and indicates where he found the gun.

There are two off the record discussions.

THEN, Weitzman admits he called the rifle a 7.65 Mauser, because “that’s what it looked like.” But Boone says Fritz made this pronouncement.   He says he is familiar with Mausers as he used to sell guns.

Ball leads the witness by saying “the time the rifle was found at 1:22pm, is that correct.”

Although previously in this deposition Weitzman says he did not see Fritz handle or remove anything from the rifle, he now says he saw Fritz take charge of the rifle and eject one life round from the chamber.

Weitzman says he thought the scope was a 2.5 Weaver.  The official explanation was that it turned out to be a Japanese scope, both Weitzman and Ball agree.

WC Attorney Ball now suddenly leads the witness back to the rail yard scene and prompts him to admit he asked a yardman a question.   Weitzman says the yardman says he saw someone throw something in the bush.  Weitzman now claims he went over to the bush and found the piece of JFK’s skull.  (earlier he said the skull was brought to him, after being found in the street.)  The yardman says the “noise”came from the retaining wall.

=== - === - === - === - === - === - 

Impressions from Seymour Weitzman's testimony:

  1. Weitzman is not asked nor does he explain why he goes to the TSBD or who ordered him there.   Neither do Sheriff's deputies Boone or Mooney.
  2. This is the most leading and directed testimony so far - WC attorney Ball is practically putting details into Weitzman's mouth, with which Weitzman agrees.   (i.e., "the time was 1:22, correct?") The 1:22 time was given earlier in testimony by Deputy Boone.
  3. Weitzman and Ball go off the record and Weitzman contradicts his own testimony at least twice.  Initially he says "someone" brought him a piece of Kennedy's skull found in the street; later he says he himself found the skull piece in the bushes at the direction of a railroad employee.   Initially he says he didn't see Captain Fritz around nor remove anything from the found rifle; but later he says Captain Fritz handled the rifle and ejected a live bullet (!!!).
  4. In contradiction to Boone, Weitzman claims he, Weitzman, identified the rifle as a Mauser first, not Captain Fritz as Boone maintains.  He also takes credit for misidentifying the scope, although he insists he has experience selling guns and implies he is able to recognize the different makes and models.  There are now 2 versions of who and why the rifle was identified as a Mauser.
  5. The business of the skull fragment and finding the rifle are so confused and contradictory; obviously WC attorney Ball wants this witness done as soon as possible.  The testimony is prematurely ended when the two contradictions are blatantly obvious.  This is a loose cannon witness.
  6. What did Weitzman do with the skull fragment after either someone handed it to him or he found it in the bushes?  He says he gave it to a secret service agent - is this authenticated by other testimony?  Who knows????   
  7. Claims the 6th floor was saturated with sheriff's deputies - but this contradicts Mooney who says he was alone.  This also contradicts Deputy Boone who says the DPD was in charge.  There are now 3 versions of the leadership on the 6th floor and how many people were there.
  8. Weitzman claims a "man-tight" cordon of protection was made around the found gun, but the other deputies simply say Fritz came and picked it up.  Beyond that, there is no testimony so far from anyone about what then happens to the gun and its chain of custody.
  9. Weitzman offers only a few confused and contradictory details - and other details he offers are practically put into his mouth by WC attorney Ball.  
  10. Glaring unasked questions include: What of the press photographers seen by other deputies in the TSBD?   Where is Sheriff Decker, his boss?   Who told him to start on the ground floor and start searching?   Who exactly was in charge of the 6th floor, the DPD or DCSD?  Why was there such attention to the 6th floor before the gun was even found?   Did he use elevators or stairs?  What did he do the rest of the day and for the rest of the investigation?  What did he do with the skull fragment?   How did he know those were Secret Service officers he saw around the train track?
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13 hours ago, Paul Trejo said:

Jason,

Thanks for your hard work summarizing all this WC data on Deputy Boone.  Here are my opinions:

...

(1.4) There was never any WC cross-examination of any Dallas Law officers.  The only thing that sounded like WC cross-examination was directed to Marina Oswald and to Ruth Paine -- the two people who knew the very least about the JFK Assassination.  They had to endure thousands and thousands of WC questions -- literally.

 

Boone's testimony is perfunctory at the hands of WC attorney Ball, although Senator Cooper does make a few brief moments of lucid fact-finding interjections.  By itself, Boone's words might be of little interest.  However, Boone's testimony becomes a set of plot points and alleged facts which we might establish as a baseline for use in comparing other testimonies.  I might make a table of essential plot points to compare across the testimonies.  

 

12 hours ago, Paul Trejo said:

...

2.  There are two reasons that Deputies give for running toward the railroad tracks:

2.1.  That they heard shots from there;

2.2.  That Sheriff Bill Decker ordered them all to go there, because he was afraid that the Dallas Police would take too long to get there.

2.3.  We have the radio transmission record from Sheriff Bill Decker that confirms this order.

[Jason Ward:] I have yet to see evidence about Decker's orders in the testimony we've looked at on this thread, although Boone says he gets orders second hand from Decker (i.e. through another officer) to go to the TSBD.

...

4.  I agree with your emphasis, Jason, that the only thing they saw when they got there (aside from obvious spectators) were Dallas policemen.   

4.1. That is important, in my humble opinion, because these same Dallas policemen shot JFK.  The Deputies knew this, but they also knew that nobody in Dallas (or the USA) would doubt a policeman (or wonder why a policeman had a weapon).

4.2.  Again, why did they run to the TSBD?   Did Bill Decker give that order?  He was not in Dealey Plaza at that time, and there is no radio transmission record to confirm this, IIRC.

[Jason Ward:] Constable Weitzman says he saw Secret Service men around the railroad track area.  Not only does Mooney and especially Weitzman offer no explanation as to why they went to the TSBD, they also offer nothing as to why they went to the 6th floor, nor why the 6th floor was the center of such interest before the gun was found.

...

5.  When we finally piece together all of the WC testimony from all of the Sheriff Deputies, we will find a fairly consistent story -- with minor deviations (mostly from Deputy Roger Craig).

[Jason Ward:]  Dallas County peace officers Boone, Mooney, and Weitzman don't agree among themselves whether they were alone or whether the 6th floor was crowded; they don't agree who identified the rifle as a Mauser; they don't agree as to whether Captain Fritz removed a live bullet from the gun; and they don't agree whether it was DPD or Sheriff's deputies in charge at the 6th floor.

7.  It is absolutely riveting that Deputy Luke Mooney had no clue WHY he went to the 6th floor.  That is covering up a Big Secret, in my opinion.   

[Jason Ward:] Boone, Mooney, and Weitzman are not asked and do not volunteer why they focused on the 6th floor.   Although Constable Weitzman makes by far the most problematic testimony so far in that he contradicts himself twice in the space of a few minutes over important plot points in the chain of evidence*, Weitzman offers the only reasonable explanation of his search of the TSBD in that he simply claims he started searching on the ground floor and worked his way up.    

* Dallas County Constable Weitzman contradicts himself twice within his own direct testimony.  First he says "someone" brought him a piece of the president's skull found in the road, but a few moments later Weitzman claims he himself found the skull fragment hidden in the bushes because a railroad employee saw something thrown there.   The other contradiction is that at first Weitzman says a human cordon of protective officers kept the gun from being disturbed until the crime lab could get to the scene and that Fritz did not remove a bullet from the found rifle - yet later in the same deposition Weitzman says Fritz quickly came over to handle the rifle and removed a live shell.

7.1.  The Big Secret is easy to guess -- namely -- that all the Deputy stories were coordinated in advance -- and in this case, Luke Mooney could SIMPLY NOT REMEMBER WHAT THE GROUP STORY WAS!

[Jason Ward:] The weakest link now is Weitzman.  He can't get anything straight.  A real screw-up!

...

11.  Finally Captain Bill Fritz and Sherriff Bill Decker arrive together, and chat on the street below the TSBD.  

[Jason Ward:] Fritz is so far the decisive character in my view.   Clearly Decker and Fritz are coordinating crime scene processing.

12.  Deputy Mooney claims that he discovered the crime scene and requested "crime lab officers."

[Jason Ward:] Yet it is DPD Captain Fritz who acts as a "crime lab officer" by handling all the evidence.

 

13.  As for the chicken bones -- I see no reason to belabor them -- they belonged to the lunch of one of the workers at the TSBD, who would admit this in his WC testimony.  

13.1.  I see very little use in discussion of a Dr. Pepper, Coke or other soft drink.  

[Jason Ward:] I might get back to you about the bones and the Dr Pepper.  It looks like another plot point that is contradicted among the testimony provided.  Lunch menus are irrelevant; where lunches were found and by who, according to testimony, might indicate mendacity.

...

14.1.1.  What confuses me is how Deputy Mooney could be ALONE on the 6th floor long enough to allegedly FIND the shell casings.   I doubt that part.

[Jason Ward:] The peace officers are alternately alone or in a crowd of other officers on the 6th floor.  The testimony is confused on this point.

...

14.3.  I am not concerned with the identity of press photographers -- though perhaps I should be.

[Jason Ward:] The possibility that there are potentially other unknown witnesses and evidence from the 6th floor is only one thing about Mooney's insistence on pointing out press photographers - the other issue is if this is consistent with other peace officer testimony as to those present on the 6th floor, IMO.

 

All best,
--Paul

 

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On 3/12/2018 at 2:48 PM, Paul Trejo said:

Jason,

I agree that Jim is a serious JFK researcher, and has always proven to be a genuine asset to investigate General Walker.   As for the possible help of the KGB to get Oswald from Helsinki into the USSR, I will take a skeptical position, however, until positive evidence is produced.   So far we have only innuendo.

My CT weighs the following facts.  Lee Harvey Oswald was 19 years old when he entered the USSR, spending nearly the entire year of 1959 as a Marine on duty at El Toro Marine Base in Southern California, struggling to teach himself to read Russian, carefully watched by other Marines and his commanding officers, and almost never leaving the Marine base, i.e. saving all of his meager Marine salary.  When Lee left the Marines, he had thousands of dollars of his own -- something he never had before in his life.

Lee had taught himself Marxism as a teenager wandering the streets of New York city in the mid-1950's, when he got into trouble with the truant authorities there.   Lee was already a defensive personality, and his Marxism was his badge of resistance to "the Establishment."   Yet Lee was never a Communist.

The proof is that after Lee got himself into the USSR, he never surrendered his US citizenship; never applied for USSR citizenship, and he never joined the Communist party.  Additional evidence includes his personal papers, and his language to others later, sharply criticizing the USSR for social failings.   Marina held the same opinion.

As for Lee allegedly entering the USSR with KGB help, obviously the historical facts fail to support that scenario.   Lee was denied entry by the USSR.  Then he slashed his wrists.  He was rushed to the emergency hospital, and there the USSR had to decide -- here was a mere 19-year old boy slashing his wrists to get into their great country, they said.  Now, there were dozens of US citizens applying for USSR entry every year.   What would they do?    Perhaps this one is interesting.  They would keep him in Minsk, where they keep all suspected guests -- put him to work and keep an eye on him.

All best,
--Paul

Mr. Trejo, I'M going to call out a BLATANT falsehood in your post above.

Oswald's suicide attempt occurred AFTER he entered the USSR...not BEFORE. It had NOTHING to do with getting him INTO the USSR, and everything to do with REMAINING there once he got in.

You have a habit of playing fast and loose with the truth. I WILL NOT LET THAT PASS.

And I quoted your entire post so you cannot HONESTLY accuse me of twisting your words.

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On 3/16/2018 at 7:59 AM, Paul Trejo said:

Jason,

You've got a fairly complete list here -- and obviously it's too large, at 91 names.   So, let's whittle it down.

...

Deputy Buddy Walthers

...

 

 

Police and Sheriff testimony in the Warren Commission Part 4: Dallas County Sheriff's Deputy Buddy Walthers

 

EDDY RAYMOND WALTHERS aka “Buddy Walthers”
DCSD Deputy

Buddy Walthers: 35, Dallas County deputy sheriff for 9 years.  On 22 November he was watching the motorcade with [Dallas County Sheriff’s wife] Mrs. Decker on Main Street at the sheriff’s office.  Like officers Boone, Mooney, and Weitzman, Walthers immediately runs across Dealey Plaza and jumps the retaining wall after he hears 3 shots.  He says there are “a lot of people just rummaging” around by the train tracks and parking lot.

Walthers then says he went to the grassy area between Elm and Main looking in the grass for evidence of shots fired or whether “they might be blanks or something.” (!)(???)  He finds a man and parked car on Main St headed east, partially under the triple overpass.  “The man” confronts Walthers asking if he, Walthers, is looking for bullet damage, to which Walthers replies yes.   “The man” says he was struck by something on his cheek.  Walthers says he finds a place on the curb on Main street where a bullet struck.

Warren Commision attorny Liebeler announces “the man” with the cheek wound is Jim Tague.

Walthers says he is able to determine by the bullet scar on the curb that the shot was fired from the TSBD or the building just east of the TSBD.    He says all other deputies are running in cricles at this point, and that he runs into deputy Allan Sweatt.   Walthers explains that deputies immediately started surrounding the TSBD.  Then, Walthers says he started gathering up witnesses and taking them to the sheriff’s office to give statements.

Next, Walthers hears an officer is shot in Oak Cliff but cannot remember how he hears about this.  He grabs a couple more deputies to proceed to Oak Cliff, concerned, he says, that all the manpower is concentrated in Dealey Plaza leaving Oak Cliff crime scene undermanned.  Walthers hears a commercial radio station say first that JFK was shot and next that he was dead – confirming what Walthers says he did not know for sure prior to being in Oak Cliff..   “Immediately after that” Walthers heard on the police radio that a suspect in officer Tippit’s shooting was hiding in the library.  Police then converge on the library.  This is a mistake.  Walthers gets back in his car and is immediately called to the Texas Theater.

Walthers arrives at the Texas Theater with a sawed off shotgun and asks the manager to turn on the house lights.  He goes into the balcony, but Walthers says no one is there.  He sees confusion below on the main level and joins in the fracas, noticing “two hands wrapped around a pistol,” further admitting “it was pretty much of a mess to tell what was really happening.”  Oswald is subdued and detained.

Upon returning to his car, Walthers says there are a lot of people congregating around the theatre as sepctators.  The crowd is angry and says, “let us have him,” according to Walthers, who has to use his shotgun as a “battering ram” to get back to his own car.   Walthers loses the two officers who went with him to the Texas Theater, and drives back to the sheriff’s office.

Back at the station, Sheriff Decker hands deputy Buddy Walthers a piece of paper containing Ruth Paine’s address in Irving, “where," Walthers says, "this Oswald had been staying with Mrs. Paine.”  2515 West 5th St.  Walthers drives to the Paine house with sheriff’s deputy Harry Weatherford, where they meet DPD officers Adamcik and Rose (see above in the thread for Adamcik’s testimony).   Walthers says that Ruth Paine invites them in with “Come on in, we’ve been expecting you.”

Walthers goes to the garage and finds a big barrel with leaflets that say “Freedom for Cuba.”  He also finds a grey blanket which he says shows the imprint of a gun.  Attorney Liebeler is suspicious of this imprint claim and Walthers insists he can tell the blanket roll wrapped a rifle.

Walthers quickly moves from the gun impression on the blanket to the discovery of 6 or 7 file cabinets.  These and pictures were put in the trunk of the car.

>>>Marina provides Walthers with a phone number to reach Oswald in Oak Cliff, Walthers says.  Walthers calls sheriff Decker, who uses a reverse directory to determine the precise address of Oswald’s boarding house.<<<

Michael Paine now shows up at Ruth’s house in Irving, who according to Walthers,  says Oswald is a committed communist. 

Walthers then brings Marina, and the kids, and “everyone” to DPD headquartes, specifically to Captain Fritz’s office for questioning, along with confiscated evidence.

Warren Commission attorney Liebeler and Walthers discuss the contents of the fiile cabinets, but Walthers denies knowing the details of their contents. 

The testimony moves back to Dealey Plaza, and Walthers denies finding a spent bullet that day in Dealey Plaza.  Walthers says “it just can’t be” that someone was shooting from the train tracks area.  Liebeler seems intent on pinning down Walthers on the point of whether he ever said a shot came from the railroad tracks area. (why?)   Liebeler also asks about Walthers ability to identify a fresh bullet mark on the curb and they discuss a picture of the curb scar. 

Walthers says the “last shot” must have been an “awfully high” miss from the TSBD, flyng over the tops of cars.  Liebeler tries to pin down Walthers on how he knows it was the last shot …[but the explanation doesn’t make sense]. The explanation is that it must have been the last shot because otherwise the car would have already been too far up under the triple overpass – [but how does Walthers know the timing of the shots…maybe it was an earlier shot?]

Walthers says he hears Oswald at the Texas Theatre say “It’s all over now,” or “Now it’s over now.”  He denies knowing whether Oswald tried to fire a gun in the theatre.

Walthers concludes his Warren Commission testimony by apologizing for being “a little evasive.” (!)

 

CONCERNS

  1. Dallas county deputy sheriff Buddy Walthers places himself in three important places on 22 November: <1> Dealey Plaza – where his handy geometric calculations applied to the bullet scar on the curb lead everyone to the TSBD, and, <2> the Texas Theater, where his presence seems less important, although this is how he loses his colleagues, and <3> Ruth Paine’s house in Irving.
  2. Who else, if anyone, plays a role in both Dealey Plaza, the Texas Theater, and the Paine house?
  3. Is the library venue important?   Was Oswald originally supposed to be in the library, with perhaps the Texas Theatre as backup?
  4. Dealey Plaza is a convenient place for the sheriff’s deputies – they have NO duties for the presidential trip yet are able to walk/run to the 6th floor right away.
  5. How does Sheriff Decker get the address of Ruth Paine’s house to hand to deputy Buddy Walthers?
  6. The convenient way Oswald's rooming house address is discovered, according to Walthers, is exceptionally helpful in explaining how the police were able to build their case so quickly.   Without Marina helpfully volunteering a phone number for the rooming house, sheriff Decker would not be able to do a reverse-lookup and find the location of still more interesting evidence.  Does anyone else besides Walther authenticate this story about Marina providing a phone number?
  7. When Walthers returns from the Texas Theater, we are to believe that nothing else happens at the sheriff’s office besides Walthers getting Paine’s address from Decker?   What order does Walthers receive?
  8. Boone, Mooney, Weitzman, and Walthers give precisely the same explanation for their actions during and immediately after they see the motorcade pass by and hear shots.  They all 4 say they ran over to the railroad tracks and hopped a retaining wall to get there.
  9. Why does Walthers break off his search of the railroad tracks area and instead look for bullet evidence in the grass between Elm and Main?  Why does he suggest “they might be blanks or something?”
  10. Walthers ballistics expertise in tracing the curb damage to the TSBD is …  convenient.  This bit of ballistics work on the part of Walthers helps explain -weakly- how the TSBD became the center of police efforts.  
  11. Walthers testimony places the curb scar and Jim Teague injury as the last shot without offering evidence as to the timing or sequence of all the shots.  How does he know?
  12. Walthers stops just short of saying he himself orders the TSBD surrounded.   He strongly implies, however, that his discovery of the bullet scar on the curb is the evidence justifying quick police attention to the TSBD.
  13. Walthers says he finds the blanket in the Paine garage with an imprint of a gun.   No one else so far mentions a gun imprint.
  14. [sidenote: attorney Liebeler IMO is alone among Warren Commission lawyers in determining and making public that General Edwin Walker has something to hide.  He does this by eliciting perjured direct testimony from Walker regarding the explanation for how a German newspaper pinpoints Oswald as Walker's attempted assassin before the police or FBI do.  Here in Walthers' testimony, Liebeler shows a more healthy suspicion of police claims than most any other staff member taking depositions.  I personally have a hunch Liebeler or his papers or his family potentially hold undiscovered clues in the assassination:     http://www.edwardjayepstein.com/liebeler.htm             ]
  15. Walthers testimony quickly puts on the record 1. Pro-Castro leaflets, 2. Evidence of a rifle wrapped in a blanket, 3. 6 or 7 file cabinets, 4. An explanation of how they found the address to Oswald’s boarding house in Oak Cliff. 5. Michael Paine’s allegation that Oswald is a true communist.  Walthers is a casemaker against Oswald.

 

Buddy Walthers is kind of the superman that day in terms of Dallas law enforcement officers. 

He leaps miraculously from Dealey Plaza, to the Texas Theater, and then on to Ruth Paine's house.  He alone pinpoints the TSBD for the benefit of other police officers, using his forensic evidence skills in determining the bullet that hit Tague came from the TSBD.   He alone enables police to find Oswald's rooming house in Oak Cliff, by receiving the rooming house phone number from Marina at the Paine house.  Walthers sees a gun impression in a blanket found in Ruth's garage, an impression mentioned nowhere else.  Walthers provides evidence that Oswald is a known communist and known Castro supporter.  Finally, Walthers assures the Warren Commission that there is no way shots could have come from the railroad tracks area.

Officers Boone, Mooney, and Weitzman helped out in whatever happened at the TSBD after Kennedy was shot, according to their testimony.  But Buddy Walthers was everywhere important that day in Dallas and facilitated key points in proving the logical development of the case against Oswald.  Walthers is everywhere, he's the go-to guy when explanations are needed for police behavior.

 

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2 hours ago, Mark Knight said:

Mr. Trejo, I'M going to call out a BLATANT falsehood in your post above.

Oswald's suicide attempt occurred AFTER he entered the USSR...not BEFORE. It had NOTHING to do with getting him INTO the USSR, and everything to do with REMAINING there once he got in.

You have a habit of playing fast and loose with the truth. I WILL NOT LET THAT PASS.

And I quoted your entire post so you cannot HONESTLY accuse me of twisting your words.

Mr. Knight,

No need to be so accusing.   If I make a genuine mistake, I'm always willing to admit it.

In this case, however, I think you're also splitting hairs.

Although you are CORRECT in stating that Oswald's attempted suicide occurred AFTER he entered the USSR, and not BEFORE -- you also ADMIT that Oswald's attempted suicide had "everything to do with REMAINING" inside the USSR once he "got in."

You are accusing me of a "BLATANT falsehood" when actually I could argue that it is a matter of PERSPECTIVE.   

Although Lee Harvey Oswald was on the other side of the border when he "attempted suicide" (i.e. sliced his wrists in a shallow manner), the fact remains that the USSR authorities were debating whether to ship him back on any given hour of the day.

So, you're really overstating your case by accusing me of "BLATANT" falsehood.

Oswald was still not really "in" the USSR -- technically -- he was on the border and his status was "undecided."    

Sincerely,
--Paul Trejo

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On 3/12/2018 at 2:48 PM, Paul Trejo said:

Jason,

I agree that Jim is a serious JFK researcher, and has always proven to be a genuine asset to investigate General Walker.   As for the possible help of the KGB to get Oswald from Helsinki into the USSR, I will take a skeptical position, however, until positive evidence is produced.   So far we have only innuendo.

My CT weighs the following facts.  Lee Harvey Oswald was 19 years old when he entered the USSR, spending nearly the entire year of 1959 as a Marine on duty at El Toro Marine Base in Southern California, struggling to teach himself to read Russian, carefully watched by other Marines and his commanding officers, and almost never leaving the Marine base, i.e. saving all of his meager Marine salary.  When Lee left the Marines, he had thousands of dollars of his own -- something he never had before in his life.

Lee had taught himself Marxism as a teenager wandering the streets of New York city in the mid-1950's, when he got into trouble with the truant authorities there.   Lee was already a defensive personality, and his Marxism was his badge of resistance to "the Establishment."   Yet Lee was never a Communist.

The proof is that after Lee got himself into the USSR, he never surrendered his US citizenship; never applied for USSR citizenship, and he never joined the Communist party.  Additional evidence includes his personal papers, and his language to others later, sharply criticizing the USSR for social failings.   Marina held the same opinion.

As for Lee allegedly entering the USSR with KGB help, obviously the historical facts fail to support that scenario.   Lee was denied entry by the USSR.  Then he slashed his wrists.  He was rushed to the emergency hospital, and there the USSR had to decide -- here was a mere 19-year old boy slashing his wrists to get into their great country, they said.  Now, there were dozens of US citizens applying for USSR entry every year.   What would they do?    Perhaps this one is interesting.  They would keep him in Minsk, where they keep all suspected guests -- put him to work and keep an eye on him.

All best,
--Paul

Mr. Trejo, I'M going to call out a BLATANT falsehood in your post above.

Oswald's suicide attempt occurred AFTER he entered the USSR...not BEFORE. It had NOTHING to do with getting him INTO the USSR, and everything to do with REMAINING there once he got in.

You have a habit of playing fast and loose with the truth. I WILL NOT LET THAT PASS.

And I quoted your entire post so you cannot HONESTLY accuse me of twisting your words.

 

Mr. Trejo,

Oswald's was NOT "on the border" when he attempted suicide.  He was in MOSCOW, and had been there for WEEKS. It occurred AFTER his fake renunciation of his US citizenship at the Moscow embassy, and I'm pretty sure you know that.

If you DON'T know that, you need to do more research. If you DO know that, but insist on posting something you KNOW to be untrue... well, you know what that would make you.

And it's the opposite of a truth-teller.

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10 minutes ago, Mark Knight said:

Mr. Trejo,

Oswald's was NOT "on the border" when he attempted suicide.  He was in MOSCOW, and had been there for WEEKS. It occurred AFTER his fake renunciation of his US citizenship at the Moscow embassy, and I'm pretty sure you know that.

If you DON'T know that, you need to do more research. If you DO know that, but insist on posting something you KNOW to be untrue... well, you know what that would make you.

And it's the opposite of a truth-teller.

Mr. Knight,

Again, you show a limited range of metaphor.    "On the border." is a metaphor meaning that Oswald was "half-inside" and "half-outside," because the USSR authorities were debating at what hour to toss Lee Harvey Oswald out on his butt.

You are trying your hardest to make me into a L-I-A-R, Mr. Knight, but you are evidently "straining at gnats and swallowing the camel."

Sincerely,
--Paul Trejo

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On 3/12/2018 at 2:48 PM, Paul Trejo said:

Lee was denied entry by the USSR.  Then he slashed his wrists.  

 

So tell me, Mr. Trejo. Was Oswald on USSR soil, or was he not, when he attempted suicide? 

If he was on USSR soil, how is that possible if he was denied entry to the USSR?

I know he was denied citizenship. But he was NOT "denied entry" into the USSR. I can go to Mexico on  tourist permit. But if they deny me Mexican citizenship, while I am in Mexico, how is that denying me ENTRY to Mexico? Many non-citizens enter the US every day. Once they are here, they have ENTERED the US. And they do NOT have to become citizens to merely ENTER the country.

So Oswald was NEVER denied entry to the USSR.

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