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Texas State Guard Reserve Corps


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Before you scoff at this too quickly, consider this:

 

Before it was over, this body was guarding missile silos, and National Guard armories.

They had their own communications network and radio stations.

They had their own air force.

They had a budget in the tens of millions of dollars, and a force under arms that was larger than the Texas National Guard.

The State Guard did a lot of good work in times of crisis, like natural disasters, but the potential for a lot of mischief is also there.

 

I'll be exploring this body in a little more depth as time goes on, but I've come to believe that the Texas State Guard Reserve Corps will answer some questions I have; such as "Why is there such confusion over George Whitmeyer's job title? For another example, answer this question:

Who reported to who? Read these two excerpts carefully:

 

I posted to the Reopen the Kennedy Case Forum website on 1/9/17

So who served under who?

"Russ Baker's new book, Family of Secrets, has some information on Whitmeyer. In 1956 Jack Crichton, a close friend of George W. W. Bush, started up his own spy unit, the 488th Military Intelligence Detachment. Crichton served as the unit's commander under Lieutenant Colonel George Whitmeyer, who was in overall command of all Army Reserve units in East Texas."

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=156778130
"DPD Deputy Chief, George L. Lumpkin, drove the Pilot Car. Lumpkin was also a Captain in the 488th Military Intelligence Detachment - the spy unit in Dallas created and led by ex-OSS, Col. Jack Crichton and was the highest ranking officer in the 488th and Col. Whitmeyer's superior."

 

Which of those is true?

If Chrichton was the 488th only commander in its history (per the Spartacus biography), how could Lumpkin be a Captain in a military detatchment, and at the same time be a Colonel in the Reserves and be the superior of Lt. Colonel George Whitmeyer, who was in "overall command of all the Army Reserve units in East Texas"?

 

Steve Thomas

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Steve, this excerpt from a Bill Kelly blog could be relevant.."While most of the descriptions of the motorcade mention only the Lead Car, driven by DPD Chief Curry, and including Secret Service officers, in front of the Lead Car there was a Pilot Car, driven by 488th member Capt. Lumpkin.

According to Peter Dale Scott's Dallas COPA (2010) address, this car pulled to the side of the road in front of the TSBD and Capt. Lumpkin talked briefly to one of the three police officers assigned to traffic duty at that intersection (Huston & Elm), sixty feet below the Sixth Floor Sniper's window. Except there is no mention of this stop or what was conveyed to the cops in the official reports.

CE 767; Warren Commission Hearings, Volume XVII, page 596.
http://www.maryferre...4&relPageId=631

CE 768; Warren Commission Hearings, Volume XVII, page 605.
http://www.maryferre...bsPageId=139422

Jerry Rose deals with the pilot car
in The Dance of the Railroad Men
http://www.maryferre...bsPageId=519723
and
The Dance of the Railroad Men Reconsidered
http://www.maryferre...34&relPageId=24

The driver of the car was Deputy Chief G. L Lumpkin.

Two homicide detectives were also in the Pilot Car.

A fourth occupant was Lt. Col. George Whitmeyer

Col. Whitmeyer was the Commanding Officer of the NorthernDistrict of Texas and gave the military "stand down" order.

But Lumplin was the highest ranking reserve Col. In the Military Intelligenceand had to have given Whitmeyer this order.

Lumpkin never testified before the Warren Commission eventhough he was Deputy Chief of the Dallas Police and drove the Pilot Car. Hetestified before the HSCA in 1977.

Lt. Col. Whitmyer was due to testify in 1978.

April 18, 1978 newspaper headline "Whitmeyer found dead."

Commission Document 81.1 - AG Texas
http://www.maryferre...84&relPageId=72

Activities of pilot car on November 22, 1963.

Lumpkin driving, Turner right front
Senkel left rear, Whitemeyer center rear, Puterbauch right rear.

And introduces yet another federal intelligence/law enforcement agency into the mix -
the US Alcohol Tax Unit - who are these guys? Did they file reports or what?

http://educationforum.ipbhost.com/index.php?app=core&module=attach§ion=attach&attach_rel_module=post&attach_id=22150

http://educationforum.ipbhost.com/index.php?app=core&module=attach§ion=attach&attach_rel_module=post&attach_id=22151

http://jfk.ci.dallas.tx.us/15/1549-002.gif

Fay M. Turner Testimony: http://www.jfk-assas...ol7/page217.php

F. M. Turner Report: http://jfk.ci.dallas...15/1549-001.gif; http://jfk.ci.dallas...15/1549-002.gif; http://jfk.ci.dallas...15/1549-003.gif; http://jfk.ci.dallas...15/1549-004.gif; http://jfk.ci.dallas...15/1549-005.gif;http://jfk.ci.dallas...15/1549-006.gif; http://jfk.ci.dallas...15/1549-007.gif

Billy L. Senkel: http://jfk.ci.dallas...15/1548-001.gif; http://jfk.ci.dallas...15/1548-002.gif; http://jfk.ci.dallas...15/1548-003.gif; http://jfk.ci.dallas...15/1548-004.gif; http://jfk.ci.dallas...15/1548-005.gif

Further confirmation of the occupants and locations.

http://www.maryferre...92&relPageId=17


How did the Sixth Floor Sniper Know when the Target Car would be in the Kill Zone?

I think the Pilot Car told him.
 

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11 hours ago, Chuck Schwartz said:

Steve, this excerpt from a Bill Kelly blog could be relevant.."While most of the descriptions of the motorcade mention only the Lead Car, driven by DPD Chief Curry, and including Secret Service officers, in front of the Lead Car there was a Pilot Car, driven by 488th member Capt. Lumpkin.

According to Peter Dale Scott's Dallas COPA (2010) address, this car pulled to the side of the road in front of the TSBD and Capt. Lumpkin talked briefly to one of the three police officers assigned to traffic duty at that intersection (Huston & Elm), sixty feet below the Sixth Floor Sniper's window. Except there is no mention of this stop or what was conveyed to the cops in the official reports.
A fourth occupant was Lt. Col. George Whitmeyer

Col. Whitmeyer was the Commanding Officer of the NorthernDistrict of Texas and gave the military "stand down" order.

But Lumplin was the highest ranking reserve Col. In the Military Intelligenceand had to have given Whitmeyer this order.


Lt. Col. Whitmyer was due to testify in 1978.

April 18, 1978 newspaper headline "Whitmeyer found dead."

Commission Document 81.1 - AG Texas
http://www.maryferre...84&relPageId=72

Activities of pilot car on November 22, 1963.


And introduces yet another federal intelligence/law enforcement agency into the mix -
the US Alcohol Tax Unit - who are these guys? Did they file reports or what?

http://educationforum.ipbhost.com/index.php?app=core&module=attach§ion=attach&attach_rel_module=post&attach_id=22150


How did the Sixth Floor Sniper Know when the Target Car would be in the Kill Zone?

I think the Pilot Car told him.
 

Chuck,

 

Thank you for contributing to this thread. There are a couple of things I'd like to address:

 

1) You said, "A fourth occupant was Lt. Col. George Whitmeyer"

 

I have wondered how Whitmeyer came to be in that car. I got the impression that it was a last minute thing, but maybe I'm wrong. Maybe it was planned for him to be in the motorcade all along, but I've never read who invited him. I'm assuming Lumpkin invited him, or maybe Whitmeyer asked if he could be there; I just don't know how it came to pass that he was there in the first place.

 

2) You said, "Col. Whitmeyer was the Commanding Officer of the NorthernDistrict of Texas and gave the military "stand down" order.

But Lumplin was the highest ranking reserve Col. In the Military Intelligenceand had to have given Whitmeyer this order."

 

I need to find the command structure of whatever reserve unit Lumpkin and Whitmeyer belonged to. I spoke to someone in the Army Reserves, and he told me that the term "Northern District of Texas" is a phrase that is unknown to him. I believe that this command structure belongs in the Texas State Guard Reserve Corps. I need to find someone who can research in the Texas State Archives for the Texas State Guard records.

 

3) You said, "April 18, 1978 newspaper headline "Whitmeyer found dead."

Commission Document 81.1 - AG Texas
http://www.maryferre...84&relPageId=72

 

Chuck, I would be interested in reading this article. Could you copy and paste the full url?

 

4) You said, " How did the Sixth Floor Sniper Know when the Target Car would be in the Kill Zone?

I think the Pilot Car told him."

 

Not necessarily. I think any observant person could tell when the motorcade was approaching just by watching the crowd reaction. The closer the parade got, the more excited people would become.

 

5) You said, " And introduces yet another federal intelligence/law enforcement agency into the mix -
the US Alcohol Tax Unit - who are these guys? Did they file reports or what?"

 

Here's a list of the ATTU or ATF agents who were present. I'm sorry, I don't remember where I got this memo from. I should have taken better notes.

I do thank you for your contributions.

 

Steve Thomas

 

1228193086_ATFAgents(1).thumb.jpg.b24f76e85191f886115d067971318442.jpg450801468_ATFAgents(2).thumb.jpg.67d047417b8fb1fee40cf998830f4f03.jpg

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I have asked for a copy of the following folder. I'll see what they have to say.

 

Texas Adjutant General's Department:

An Inventory of Texas State Guard/Texas Defense Guard/Texas State Guard Reserve Corps Records at the Texas State Archives, 1938-1983, undated (bulk 1941-1945)

https://legacy.lib.utexas.edu/taro/tslac/30026/tsl-30026.html


 

Preferred Citation

(Identify the item), Administrative records (1948-1983), Administrative records, Texas State Guard records, Texas Adjutant General's Department. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.

 

Volume

1990/038-89

Administrative records, 1940-1983, undated (bulk 1948-1983),
4.92 cubic ft. They comprise various administrative records of the Texas State Guard Reserve Corps/Texas State Guard, 1940-1983, and undated (bulk 1948-1983), organized in a number of subject files.

 

Conferences:

Box 1990/038-73

Folder# 13

Dallas Area Conference, 1963

 

Steve Thomas

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Good work Steve - strikes me as a crucial exploration of the Colonels at Dealey Plaza. JFK Countercoup article dated April 12 2018 called Colonels at Dealey Plaza - I’m reading it now. But as you point out it is difficult to find the actual source materials. To that end I wrote to PD Scott last week asking for his sources. He has not yet responded, but says he answers everything, and that sometimes emails to him don’t arrive. I will resend today. I’m sure he has done some good homework.

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https://legacy.lib.utexas.edu/taro/tslac/30026/tsl-30026.html

Texas Adjutant General's Department:

An Inventory of Texas State Guard/Texas Defense Guard/Texas State Guard Reserve Corps Records at the Texas State Archives, 1938-1983, undated (bulk 1941-1945)

“When the Texas National Guard was demobilized in 1947, the 50th Legislature (by Senate Bill 361) created the Texas State Guard Reserve Corps (TSGRC), to provide a reservoir of military strength for use by the state in time of national or state emergency, when any part of the Texas National Guard was called into federal service. When so activated, this Texas State Guard Reserve Corps would function as the Texas State Guard (TSG). The Governor of Texas appointed a Commanding General for the Texas State Guard Reserve Corps, to be supervised by the Adjutant General of Texas. Initially the state was divided into twelve districts, each with a colonel as regimental commander. “


 

https://www.newspapers.com/newspage/45020015/

Abilene Reporter-News from Abilene, Texas

Abilene Reporter-News

Location: Abilene, Texas

Sunday, August 22, 1948

Page: Page 36

 

“HOME FORCE? What number of troops would the state wish to retain as home defense force? "A sufficiently large number to afford all possible protection lo shipping, industrial, manufacturing and transportation centers In case either a national emergency with only air threat apparent or with air and airborne threat." said (Governor Beauford ) Jester. Among other questions, Jester was asked if the state had need of a state controlled combat air force. He said no, but the state might need a transport element useful in time of emergency when the air national guard and ground forces planes are not available. Only last week, it was announced that advanced naval air training would be centered in Corpus Christi. Jester suggested that the use of C-17 and light liaison planes for rapid movement to a stricken area, transport of medical or other emergency supplies and for observation or reconnaissance of an area constitutes the chief need of the state for air national guard elements. "There is foreseen, however, an immediate need for air cover and protection in case of a national emergency with an air threat apparent." he said. "Because of the strategic geographic location of Texas and our large shipping center, together with ___ industrial weapons.. . "It is believed if either threat is apparent, both would actually exist, bill it is believed that this force should he a federal force and its size should be that directed by the Army's G-2 estimate." Governor Jester gave as his idea of local defense missions of a state force the protection of utilities, railroads and government installations from sabotage, protection of air fields, oil supply concentrations and other such installations, protection of strategic lines of concentration and munitions and military supply factories instruction of and training of civilians in the use of air raid precautions. The Governor said Texas should have a larger defense force than other states because of her great distances. He thinks there should be considerable surveying done by G-2 to determine the size of such a force. Jester gave as his opinion the need for "better realization" of all employers, large and small, of the "vital importance of an adequately trained armed force." Generally, however, he said all industry showed its interest and cooperation in the national guard, organized reserve and other civilian component units of national defense in peacetime.

 

12 DISTRICTS He (Governor Jester) gave his plan for organizing the Texas State Guard Reserve Corps. It includes a state headquarters and 12 districts with from two to four Infantry battalions and a medical unit In each district. There would be no required training and no equipment issued. Ratings would be done to Grade III enlisted men and there would be ample room for expansion. Jester expressed gratification at the passage of a state law creating such a state guard reserve corps. If the merger of the national guard and organized reserves under the Federal military system ever passes Congress, then Texas would be wholly dependent for militia service on this state guard. Before this move ever gains much headway, however, there will be plenty of opposition registered. Rep. Olin Teague, for many years a reserve officer, has some interesting conclusions to offer on the subject. It was his survey of reserve unit residents throughout the nation that formed the basis of the Gray board's report. However, Teague said he recommended that something be done to change the present reserves by the regular army. He does not agree with the Gray board's recommendation of a merger under federal jurisdiction. Teague said the Gray board report, If adopted, would hinder the reserves and benefit the regular service. "This plan would be much more costly than we need," he says. "We could have legislation setting up a changed system that would cost much less and still obtain the desired result." Pressed for steps in this reasoning. Teague said: "According to this plan, if they get 22,000 graduates annually from Reserve Officers Training Corps schools, then it will cost them $71,000,000 annually." He makes some severe charges against military higher-ups and regular army men for their "attitude" toward the reserves. Teague has been a reserve officer since 1932. He is familiar with the program and also with the hopes of the temporary officers and men who came out of World War If. If some plan had been evolved and put into successful operation immediately following the close of the last war, whereby the reserves might have kept up their training and received interested consideration, "then we would have organized the potential manpower of this nation and today we would have all the reserve strength we need," he said. "We wouldn't even need the draft." He also is a great believer In universal military training which would maintain that reserve, he feels.

 

“A WRONG ATTITUDE" "The whole attitude of the. regular army toward the reserves has got to change," Teague said. Then he cited instances where he believes the military top echelons have squelched hie reserve program. He charged that some years ago, a large sum, approximately $50,000,000 was shifted from the funds allocated to the reserves and put elsewhere in the Army budget. Since that time, appropriations for the reserves have been cut by Congress to fit that pattern and thus the reserve program has been hindered. Teague also charged that recently at Texas A&M College, in his district and also his alma mater, an incident arose which is puzzling. Some 200 men wanted to join as reserve officers but the War Department which today says it needs and wants officer material and must now have the draft would not accept this large number of applicants. Teague said he is still conducting his study of just what the Gray board report means. He is also keeping perhaps the most watchful and experienced eye In Congress on the top brass.”

 

Steve Thomas

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6 hours ago, Steve Thomas said:


 

https://www.newspapers.com/newspage/45020015/

Abilene Reporter-News from Abilene, Texas

Abilene Reporter-News

Location: Abilene, Texas

Sunday, August 22, 1948

Page: Page 36

12 DISTRICTS He (Governor Jester) gave his plan for organizing the Texas State Guard Reserve Corps. It includes a state headquarters and 12 districts with from two to four Infantry battalions and a medical unit In each district.

Battalion records, 1941-1947,

 

They comprise the records of the 51 battalions of the Texas Defense Guard/Texas State Guard, plus records of the bands, unassigned companies, and air squadrons, 1941-1947. These records are both at the battalion/squadron level and at the company/detachment/flight level. The four Battalions in the Dallas area were the 19th, the 29th, the 35th and the 51st.

 

The 29th Battalion was commanded by Major E.M. Dealey.

E.M. Dealey would go on to become the publisher of the Dallas Morning News

The 19th Battalion was commanded by Major Bernard F. McLain.

The 35th Battalion was commanded by Major James M. Crumby

 

https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/8294224/bernard-francis-mclain

Bernard Francis McLain

McLain, an Army veteran of World War I, had been commander of the John W. Low Post of the American Legion and the 19th Battalion of the Texas State Guard.”

McLain, a resident of the Melrose Hotel at the time of his death, had served as director of the Republic National Bank, Dallas Railway & Terminal Co. and Texas Industries, Inc.

An early leader in charitable activities, he was chairman of the Citizens Council committee which reorganized the Community Chest in 1939. He had served as campaign chairman, president and director of the Community Chest.
He was chairman of the Chamber of Commerce committee which brought the Veterans Hospital to Dallas. Later, he served as president of the Chamber and as a director of the American Chamber of Commerce.

 

Steve Thomas

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1 hour ago, David Josephs said:

http://www.civildefensemuseum.com/fallout/dallaseoc.html

A New colonel?  Charles McCoy.... assistant civil defense director for Dallas

News Photo Of Rendering

 

Dallas Times Herald News Photo 11-25-1965

David,

 

Thanks for the heads up about Col. McCoy.

 

https://tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/qqt01

Texas State Guard. By William C. Wilkes and Mary M. Standifer

 

"In the 1950s the Signal Corps of the Texas State Guard Reserve Corps embraced 500 radio stations statewide. These provided valuable communications assistance to civil authorities and the Red Cross in times of natural disaster."

 

Statement by Colonel John W. Mayo, Chairman of City-County Civil Defense and Disaster Commission at the Dedication of the Emergency Operations Center at Fair Park.

http://www.civildefensemuseum.com/fallout/docs/may241961a.jpg

 

This Statement appeared on the  Civil Defense and Disaster Commission letter head co-signed by Boise Smith, WRR transmitter Building at Fair Park.

WRR was a city-owned radio station.

In the Batchelor's Exhibit CE5002 https://www.history-matters.com/archive/jfk/wc/wcvols/wh19/pdf/WH19_Batchelor_Ex_5002.pdf ,

Boise Smith is listed as a Deputy Chief of Police (along with Lumpkin, Stevenson and Batchelor) and as the Director of the Civil Defense and Disaster Commission. As such, he reported directly to Curry.

 

See this statement by Mayo decrying the artists being displayed at the Art Museum

http://washingtonbabylon.com/bunker-command-center-jfk-assassination-merely-worlds-interesting-basement/

 

"In March of 1955, Col. John W. Mayo, commander of the Dallas Metropolitan Post No. 581 of the American Legion, sent a communication to the Trustees of the Art Museum decrying many of the Museum’s policies and saying that the Post objected ‘to the Museum patronizing and supporting artists … whose political beliefs are dedicated to destroying our way of life."

In this same website, it says, " An online exhibit by the Dallas City Hall provides the following historical summary of WRR, the station-of-choice for Dallas-Fort Worth highbrows since 1964, when it switched to an all classical format. Until the departments had their own internal support, WRR supplied and maintained all radio equipment for Police, Fire, Park and Recreation, Water, Public Works, and the former Health Department. At its peak it furnished dispatching services for Dallas County, Cockrell Hill Police Department, and private ambulance services (in the days before 911). WRR discontinued these adjunct services in 1969."

"In his book, Family of Secrets, veteran reporter Russ Baker notes:

In April 1, 1962, Dallas Civil Defense, with Crichton heading its intelligence component, opened an elaborate underground command post under the patio of the Dallas Health and Science Museum. Because it was intended for “continuity-of-government” operations during an attack, it was fully equipped with communications equipment.

With this shelter in operation on November 22, 1963, it was possible for someone based there to communicate with police and other emergency services. There is no indication that the Warren Commission or any other investigative body or even JFK assassination researchers looked into this facility or the police and Army Intelligence figures associated with it."

 

Steve Thomas

 

 


 

 

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26 minutes ago, David Josephs said:

Steve...

Cause it just HAS to be there...  anything about Collins Radio involved here?

Would they have outfitted the command bunker?

David,

 

Nothing comes to mind, but I'll keep my eyes open for that. It's not outside the realm of possibility.

That website http://www.civildefensemuseum.com/fallout/dallaseoc.html

has some color pictures of some of the old radio equipment. Maybe you'll recognize something.

 

Steve Thomas

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I guess my thought is whether or not you see the people in this bunker also listening to the shooting team's radio commands...

I've always felt that one of the few ways to make 3 shots sound like 1 is to have a single "Fire" command for all three......
makes 6-9 shots sound like 2-3.

There is a lot of talk of echoes as well... yet the end of DP is all open....  a shot from the RR yard for example would not echo as much as a shot from say, Dal-Tex 2nd Floor...

Another thought was whether Mike Paine would have access to these channels...  "We both know who did"... comment leads me in that direction...

Great thread Steve...  I think you've found the brass ring here....  Military Colonels is just about as much "operational plausible denial" as you can get....

Colonels are 1 step under 1-star general...   do your job well as a colonel and the stars come... I would guess.

Image result for us army chain of command 2014

Edited by David Josephs
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8 hours ago, David Josephs said:

 

Great thread Steve...  I think you've found the brass ring here....  Military Colonels is just about as much "operational plausible denial" as you can get....

Colonels are 1 step under 1-star general...   do your job well as a colonel and the stars come... I would guess.

David,

 

Excuse my French, but I have thought that a Colonel's job is a s***t job. It's all well and good when confronted with a problem for a General to yell out, "Just throw the 5th Army at it.", but it's the Colonel's job to carry out that order. He's got to do the grunt work...the logistics, transportation, supply, etc.

 

In a Wikipedia entry, it says, " Today, an Army or Marine Corps "BG" or "BGen," respectively, typically serves as deputy commander to the commanding general of a division or division-sized units and assists in overseeing the planning and coordination of a mission. In an Army infantry brigade not organic to a division, a brigadier general serves as the unit's commander, while a colonel serves as deputy commander

 

I have thought that if you do have multiple assassins, especially coming from out of town, somebody is going to have to arrange for their lodging, meals, transportation, knowledge of street routes for escape and evasion, etc.

Local Colonels would seem uniquely qualified for that kind of thing.

 

Steve Thomas

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