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On ‎2‎/‎22‎/‎2012 at 0:03 AM, Mark Wengler said:

There is one thing that has always puzzled me The photo showing the back yard of the Walker home shows the plate on the car with a hole in it. Yet there is also a photo of Oswald's belongings it shows the photo of that Oswald took and it is hole is not there.

Does anyone know who could have put the hole there removeing the plate number?

Mark, nobody ever came up with an official explanation for the destroyed license plate number; not in the Warren Commission testimony, and not in the HSCA hearings. If I were to guess, I'd say it was to hide the identify of the owner of the car - since this is the modus operandi of the FBI and CIA when they release classified information.

If this is correct, then the truth is clear -- the FBI/CIA knew who owned the car, and they chose to protect this person.

Now, why else would they choose to protect that person unless something known and clandestine was involved? No other reason.

So, the car belonged to somebody that was involved in something top secret, and the FBI/CIA chose to conceal the identity of that person.

If that is correct, then I will speculate: the owner of the car was either Larrie Schmidt or somebody close to Larrie Schmidt. Schmidt was the leader of the "Conservatism USA" movement that started in Germany among US military officers. They moved to Dallas in 1962 and successfully took over the YAF (Young Americans for Freedom), and were in the process of taking over the NIC (National Indignation Committee) and even Walker's own AEP (American Eagle Publications). Larrie Schmidt's brother, Bob Schmidt, obtained a full-time job with Walker as chauffer and errand-boy, a month before the April 10th shooting incident.

Larrie was a protoge of General Charles Willoughby, who was General MacArthur's intelligence officer - a brilliant writer who wrote the four volume history of General MacArthur's World War Two campaigns. When MacArthur was fired by President Truman, Willoughby began making up stories of a Communist plot in the White House. (This is where Joe McCarthy got his first inklings for his renegade movement.) So, Larrie Schmidt was a very ambitious young man (in his twenties) and he was very well connected with people in high places. If he was involved in any clandestine activity surrounding the JFK assassination, the FBI/CIA did not want this to be known.

That's my speculation.

Best regards,
--Paul Trejo

UPDATE March, 2017:  Today I accept the conclusion that the car belonged to Mr. Charles Klihr, who, along with his wife, was a long-time volunteer for the John Birch Society and General Edwin Walker, and who was as naïve as a child.  Mr. and Mrs. Klihr had no idea about any cloak-and-dagger plots; they were simply office volunteers for the American Eagle Publishing Company, filling book orders.  The reason the FBI scratched out their license plate number was to protect the innocent.  That's my current position.  PT

 

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There is one thing that has always puzzled me The photo showing the back yard of the Walker home shows the plate on the car with a hole in it. Yet there is also a photo of Oswald's belongings it shows the photo of that Oswald took and it is hole is not there.

Does anyone know who could have put the hole there removeing the plate number?

Mark, here's a little more about the puzzle of the blacked-out license plate. The FBI identified Charles Klihr as an owner of a 1957 Chevy who also volunteered at General Walker's home business at 4011 Turtle Creek Road. Here are the FBI documents that mention Klihr:

http://www.maryferrell.org/mffweb/archive/viewer/showDoc.do?mode=searchResult&absPageId=360199

http://www.maryferrell.org/mffweb/archive/viewer/showDoc.do?mode=searchResult&absPageId=772331

I find it interesting that Klihr was mentioned, but the FBI neglected to interview Mr. Klihr. One might conclude that the FBI already knew that Mr. Klihr would not be one of their suspects.

Dick Russell, on the other hand, has a different story in his 1992 book, The Man Who Knew Too Much. According to Russell, Bob Schmidt (the brother of Larrie Schmidt) also drove a 1957 Chevy, and he also worked for Walker -- not as a volunteer, but as a paid employee, so Bob Schmidt was there on a daily basis. Russell suspects it was Bob's car.

If Dick Russell is correct, and if the FBI knew that (since they are the likely folks who blacked out the license plate number) then the FBI went to a lot of trouble to divert attention away from the true owner of that vehicle, and to divert attention toward the harmless volunteer, Charles Klihr.

Why?

According to Dick Russell, Bob Schmidt made a confession to the FBI a few days after the JFK assassination, namely, that he and Larrie and Lee Harvey Oswald all drove together on April 10, 1963 at 9pm to shoot at General Walker. They aimed to kill.

This corresponds with at least one eye-witness, a neighbor who said that he saw a Ford Sedan speed away with two people, and he also saw a '57 Chevy at the nearby Mormon Church speed away.

So, Dick Russell was very suspicious about Larrie and Bob Schmidt, but he could never locate them. These boys should have been questioned by the Warren Commission, but they were not. Instead, their roles in the Walker affair were quickly hushed up.

Best regards,

--Paul Trejo

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Appreciate you taking the time to post that Paul. One of the items I was most interested in was the question of "When" Walker had first announced it was his belief or knowledge that Oswald had been arrested by DPD on April 10, 1963 and subsequently released by directive of the Attorney General. Everything I have seen so far shows no public statement by Edwin Walker about this issue until after the JFK Assassination.

As to whether Oswald was even involved in the April 10 shooting, I believe a good case can be made for a frame-up.

Richard, you are right to question "When" Walker first announced that he believed Oswald had been arrested by the DPD; all known records say it was the early morning of 11/23/1963 at the earliest.

However, Dick Russell, in his 1992 book, The Man Who Knew Too Much, asked a variation on your question. He tried to find out if Walker ever mentioned Oswald in any context at all in 1963 before the JFK assassination.

Most of his sources yielded zero results - except one. The personal assistant of H.L. Hunt would accompany Hunt when visiting Walker, or when Walker visited Hunt. In one of those conversations, he remembers, certainly before the assassination, Hunt and Walker distinctly mentioned Lee Harvey Oswald -- but the assistant could not remember the context of the conversation.

For another source, Harry Dean (a member of this Forum) recollects attending a John Birch Society meeting in Southern California in mid-1963 in which General Walker was in charge, and the topic of engaging Lee Harvey Oswald as a patsy in their plottings to assassinate JFK was clear and deliberate.

Harry was working for the FBI at the time of this incident, and he filed an FBI report of the incident. However, that report has never been recovered. No documentation; no recordings; no artifacts; only Harry Dean's personal memories.

Given these allegations, it appears plausible that the FBI was well aware, long in advance, that a paramilitary group was plotting something, and instead of acting on this information as FBI protocol would have demanded, J. Edgar Hoover chose to 'look the other way'.

Best regards,

--Paul Trejo

<edit typos>

Edited by Paul Trejo
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Guest Tom Scully

There is one thing that has always puzzled me The photo showing the back yard of the Walker home shows the plate on the car with a hole in it. Yet there is also a photo of Oswald's belongings it shows the photo of that Oswald took and it is hole is not there.

Does anyone know who could have put the hole there removeing the plate number?

Mark, here's a little more about the puzzle of the blacked-out license plate. The FBI identified Charles Klihr as an owner of a 1957 Chevy who also volunteered at General Walker's home business at 4011 Turtle Creek Road. Here are the FBI documents that mention Klihr:

http://www.maryferrell.org/mffweb/archive/viewer/showDoc.do?mode=searchResult&absPageId=360199

http://www.maryferrell.org/mffweb/archive/viewer/showDoc.do?mode=searchResult&absPageId=772331

I find it interesting that Klihr was mentioned, but the FBI neglected to interview Mr. Klihr. One might conclude that the FBI already knew that Mr. Klihr would not be one of their suspects.

Dick Russell, on the other hand, has a different story in his 1992 book, The Man Who Knew Too Much. According to Russell, Bob Schmidt (the brother of Larrie Schmidt) also drove a 1957 Chevy, and he also worked for Walker -- not as a volunteer, but as a paid employee, so Bob Schmidt was there on a daily basis. Russell suspects it was Bob's car.

If Dick Russell is correct, and if the FBI knew that (since they are the likely folks who blacked out the license plate number) then the FBI went to a lot of trouble to divert attention away from the true owner of that vehicle, and to divert attention toward the harmless volunteer, Charles Klihr.

Why?

According to Dick Russell, Bob Schmidt made a confession to the FBI a few days after the JFK assassination, namely, that he and Larrie and Lee Harvey Oswald all drove together on April 10, 1963 at 9pm to shoot at General Walker. They aimed to kill.

This corresponds with at least one eye-witness, a neighbor who said that he saw a Ford Sedan speed away with two people, and he also saw a '57 Chevy at the nearby Mormon Church speed away.

So, Dick Russell was very suspicious about Larrie and Bob Schmidt, but he could never locate them. These boys should have been questioned by the Warren Commission, but they were not. Instead, their roles in the Walker affair were quickly hushed up.

Best regards,

--Paul Trejo

Paul, it seems reasonable to suspect Charles Klihr was an confidential FBI informant.:

Wesley Leibler promptly wrote a letter to Charles Klihr, just after the requests he made of the FBI in October, 1966, visible at the link you posted.

Link to display of Leibler's letter to Klihr.:

http://www.maryferrell.org/mffweb/archive/viewer/showDoc.do?docId=62241&relPageId=59

Link to FBI memo describing Charles Klihr's peculiar letter to the FBI in response to Leibler's letter, and the FBI's description of its own, three years long effort to shield Klihr from any investigation.:

http://www.maryferrell.org/mffweb/archive/viewer/showDoc.do?mode=searchResult&absPageId=752424

Surrey's WC testimony describing Klihr's 1957 Chevrolet two-door frequently parked in Walker's driveway.:

http://www.maryferrell.org/mffweb/archive/viewer/showDoc.do?mode=searchResult&absPageId=17247

http://www.maryferrell.org/mffweb/archive/viewer/showDoc.do?mode=searchResult&absPageId=359405

6778250184_20d6f64818_b.jpg

http://www.maryferrell.org/mffweb/archive/viewer/showDoc.do?docId=11415&relPageId=8

6924366181_9aeae969aa_b.jpg

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Paul, it seems reasonable to suspect Charles Klihr was an confidential FBI informant.:

Wesley Leibler promptly wrote a letter to Charles Klihr, just after the requests he made of the FBI in October, 1966, visible at the link you posted.

Link to display of Leibler's letter to Klihr.:

Link to FBI memo describing Charles Klihr's peculiar letter to the FBI in response to Leibler's letter, and the FBI's description of its own, three years long effort to shield Klihr from any investigation.:

Surrey's WC testimony describing Klihr's 1957 Chevrolet two-door frequently parked in Walker's driveway...

Tom, these are valuable and relevant items of evidence. Thanks very much for them.

Yet let's review what we have here:

(1) Warren Commission attorney Wesley Liebeler himself wrote a letter to Charles Klihr to ask about the photo of the Chevy with the license blacked out.

(2) The Dallas FBI (not Mr. Klihr) replied to Wesley Leibeler to refuse his request for information. Klihr told the FBI he had no idea what Liebeler was asking for, and he had no intention of talking to him. The FBI backed up Klihr's reply, because after all there was no good reason they could see for raising questions about a case that had been closed three years previously. It just seemed like a big bother to the Dallas folks.

(3) Surrey's WC testimony described Klihr's 1957 Chevy, and he repeatedly said that he couldn't identify the car in the photo with Klihr's car. Liebeler refused to accept that answer, and pressed if it only *might* be Klihr's car. (In my opinion, Liebeler did not want anybody to honestly identify the owner -- it had to be somebody harmless.)

I think we agree that the FBI behavior is suspicious. But I don't believe we learned anything much about Charles Klihr. He *might* be a harmless volunteer, a bystander who didn't want to get involved and who begged the FBI to leave him alone. He *might* be closer to the FBI than that, but we really don't have enough evidence one way or another.

In my opinion, the Warren Commission questioning of Surrey was typical of so much questioning there, that is, the attorneys already had their minds made up about the outcome of the case, and they were careful to steer any criticism or identifications away from the Dallas rightists.

Beyond that, I can't make out anything more about Charles Klihr from all these FBI evasions.

Best regards,

--Paul Trejo

<edit typos>

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a few more and a couple of links and that's about it Paul..........fwtaw..b

testimony of General Walker.....there are some w/c photo links within of his backyard and home i believe...

http://mcadams.posc.mu.edu/russ/testimony/walker_e.htm

and

http://imageshack.us/photo/my-images/199/toomanyquestionspage1.jpg/ peter worthington's interview with general walker..

Bernice, you've evidently done some research into General Walker -- do you have any information about a personal letter than Walker sent to JFK on 26Sep63, just days before the Oxford riots?

The official title is: Open Letter, Edwin A. Walker to President John F. Kennedy, 26 September 1963.

As it turns out, the open letter from Edwin A. Walker to President Kennedy is located in the John F. Kennedy White House Central Subject File, but it has not been digitized like the other 5,000 letters in JFK's White House correspondence. The JFK Libary admits they have it, but charge $15 for a copy of this one-page document.

If anybody on this Forum has a copy of this letter, it would be nice to share in a timely manner. If not, I will fork over the $15 and wait a couple of weeks for their snail mail, and then digitize it and post it on this thread.

But it would be nice to have a look at it RIGHT NOW if anybody already has a copy.

Best regards,

--Paul Trejo

P.S. I already mentioned that any film or sound recordings of interviews of eye-witnesses to the Oxford, Mississippi riots are unavailable to the public without a special legal screening per the FOIA (Freedom of Information Act). I have requested a screening of nine sound recordings so far, and I have yet to hear a reply from NARA (the National Archives and Records Administration). If anybody on this Forum already has such sound recordings (or the few visual recordings) I believe Forum members on this thread would love to see them.

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just on the film record thing. Re the ''Oxford, USA'' film distributed by the Mississippi Sovereignty Commission as propaganda. Even though it is full of lies it serves as a mind shaper study with numerous oral histories and selective footage. It was withdrawn from distributions when its fundamental flaws became untenable. About '65 from mem. However it may be that copies went missing (there are MSC records that supports this notion.

I doubt getting hold of a copy would require a FOIA. There must be a copy somewhere.

Maybe Simms, or whatever they became, in Dallas.

edit rephrase

Edited by John Dolva
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just on the film record thing. Re the ''Oxford, USA'' film distributed by the Mississippi Sovereignty Commission as propaganda. Even though it is full of lies it serves as a mind shaper study with numerous oral histories and selective footage. It was withdrawn from distributions when its fundamental flaws became untenable. About '65 from mem. However it may be that copies went missing (there are MSC records that supports this notion.

I doubt getting hold of a copy would require a FOIA. There must be a copy somewhere.

Maybe Simms, or whatever they became, in Dallas.

John, that's an interesting reference, and I will try to locate that film.

I want to learn as much as possible about the riots at Oxford, Mississippi University in 1962, because I believe this is probably where General Edwin Walker first got the idea that JFK must be dealt with more severely.

All best,

--Paul

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...If Walker was on public record before the JFK assassination, of believing that the Kennedy brothers had taken out a contract on him, and attempted to shoot him, that should have made Walker the prime suspect in the eyes of law enforcement after JFK was assassinated.

Richard, that's true -- unless the FBI chose instead to back Walker's rage. All the FBI needed to do in this particular case was to 'look the other way.'

Best regards,

--Paul Trejo

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...One of the items I was most interested in was the question of "When" Walker had first announced it was his belief or knowledge that Oswald had been arrested by DPD on April 10, 1963 and subsequently released by directive of the Attorney General. Everything I have seen so far shows no public statement by Edwin Walker about this issue until after the JFK Assassination...

I don't know how this escaped me, Richard, but one of the most interesting artifacts we have that connect Walker with Oswald between 4/10/1963 and 11/22/1963 is a home movie made by a young man named John Martin.

In this home movie (reviewed by Martin Shackleford) a young man goes to visit General Edwin Walker at his home in Dallas, to film the bullet holes recently made by a sniper. The film shows a view from the airplane on the ride to Dallas, and then the Walker house.

Later in that same film, the young man is in a park in New Orleans, when he hears a commotion on Canal Street, and runs over to see the fuss. It is Lee Harvey Oswald fighting with Carlos Bringuier, and the police arresting them and taking them away.

In the final scene of the film, the young man pans Canal street buildings, and then narrows down to the sidewalk, and then to an FPCC flyer lying in the gutter.

I have not yet seen this film with my own eyes, but members of this Forum have verified that it exists, and that the Jack Martin who took this film was not the same Jack Martin who worked for Guy Banister. Actually, this John Martin was about 23 years old in 1963 (according to Harold Weisberg's associate, Gary Schoener) although the FBI claimed he was only 17.

John Martin also admitted to Weisberg and Schoener that he was a member of the Minutemen organization, too, and we know that General Walker was an officer in the Minutemen. John Martin also said he served under Walker in the 24th Infantry Division in Germany. (Weisberg and Schoener did not follow-up the Walker connection back in 1968, because they were too busy trying to identify people in the crowd during the Oswald-Bringuier episode.)

My speculation is that young John Martin made this film on behalf of General Walker in August of 1963. The film makes a visual connection between the April 10th shooting and the (later to be identified) shooter, Lee Harvey Oswald. It is part of a political frame-up, in my opinion.

If this is correct, then it directly implicates General Walker in activities involving Oswald before 11/22/1963.

Best regards,

--Paul Trejo

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I was thinking about the photo that shows Oswald's belonging with the photo of walker's backyard.

If a person had the camera original negative with today's tek could they enhance the photo to show the car's plate to be able to read it.

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...If Walker was on public record before the JFK assassination, of believing that the Kennedy brothers had taken out a contract on him, and attempted to shoot him, that should have made Walker the prime suspect in the eyes of law enforcement after JFK was assassinated...

Richard, I've already shared three documents from General Walker's archives that deliberately seek to link himself with Oswald and JFK.

(1) I shared Walker's last known article on this topic, from November, 1991, which he claimed the DPD arrested Oswald on 4/10/1963, but RFK demanded his release that very night.

(2) I shared an excerpt from a longer article from April, 1967, by Walker, which also claims that Oswald was "picked up by the law enforcement agency between 9pm and 12 midnight...He was released...The pickup was withheld from the public."

(3) I shared Walker's interview with the German newspaper, Deutsche NationalZeitung, less than 24 hours after the JFK assassination. That article, published the following Sunday (11/29/1963) also claimed that Oswald was arresed for the April shooting at Walker on 4/10/1963, but was released by RFK.

Tonight I'd like to share two more articles from Walker's archives on this same topic.

(4) In a four page lambast of the Kennedy legacy, dated 6/12/1968, one week after the assassination of RFK, Walker as usual writes of himself in the third person: "If authority, in the hands of the Attorney General and the Justice Department, had not seen fit to free Oswald and his associates in the attempted assassination of Edwin A. Walker -- there is no reason to doubt that President John F. Kennedy and Senator Robert F. Kennedy would be alive today."

(5) In 1975, Senator Frank Church's Committee proposed re-opening the JFK assassination case. In a single page, typed letter to Senator Church, dated 6/23/1975, Walker writes:

"Dear Senator Church: The Warren Commission found and concluded that Lee Harvey Oswald attempted to assassinate the undersigned at his home, at 9pm on April 10, 1963. The initial and immediate investigation at the time of the incident reported two men at my home, one with a gun, seen by an eye-witness -- a neighbor. Within days I was informed by a Lieutenant on the Dallas City Police Force that Oswald was in custody by 12pm that night for questioning. He was released on higher authority than that in Dallas. There were two men, not a 'Lonely Loner.' Please inform me if the CIA was involved in this attempted assassination. Yours Sincerely, Edwin A. Walker"

On his typed copy, Walker writes in his own handwriting: "No reply."

So, there we observe two more examples of General Walker's curious claim that Oswald had been arrested by the DPD on April 10, 1963, and RFK demanded his release.

Three newspapers (to my knowledge) repeated that tale: The Deutsche NationalZeitung on November, 29, 1963, the National Enquirer on May 17, 1964 (though they refused to name their source) and the Kerrville Daily News on January 19, 1992.

I myself find nothing credible in that story -- but that is what makes me suspicious. Given that this story is an obvious fiction, why in the world would General Walker try to spread it around; not only the day after JFK was killed, but again and again, decade after decade?

It seems to me that this fabrication was intended to confess and even boast about something (i.e. a direct link between Walker, Oswald and the JFK assassination), as well as to misdirect attention from something (e.g. being a conspirator) to something else (e.g. being a victim).

This Big Myth by General Walker might possibly be a veiled confession. Otherwise, why in the world would he continue to push this false tale for the rest of his life -- especially since nobody in the world was paying any attention to him anymore?

It's suspicious to me. Now, if somebody were to say that General Walker believed it because he was suffering from paranoid delusions (as RFK himself suspected) then that would not absolve General Walker from suspicion, rather, in my opinion it should increase our suspicions that he was capable of concealed activity such as a conspiracy.

Just a theory - admittedly - but it continues to intrigue me.

Best regards,

--Paul Trejo

Edited by Paul Trejo
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...One of the items I was most interested in was the question of "When" Walker had first announced it was his belief or knowledge that Oswald had been arrested by DPD on April 10, 1963 and subsequently released by directive of the Attorney General. Everything I have seen so far shows no public statement by Edwin Walker about this issue until after the JFK Assassination...

I don't know how this escaped me, Richard, but one of the most interesting artifacts we have that connect Walker with Oswald between 4/10/1963 and 11/22/1963 is a home movie made by a young man named John Martin.

In this home movie (reviewed by Martin Shackleford) a young man goes to visit General Edwin Walker at his home in Dallas, to film the bullet holes recently made by a sniper. The film shows a view from the airplane on the ride to Dallas, and then the Walker house.

Later in that same film, the young man is in a park in New Orleans, when he hears a commotion on Canal Street, and runs over to see the fuss. It is Lee Harvey Oswald fighting with Carlos Bringuier, and the police arresting them and taking them away.

In the final scene of the film, the young man pans Canal street buildings, and then narrows down to the sidewalk, and then to an FPCC flyer lying in the gutter.

I have not yet seen this film with my own eyes, but members of this Forum have verified that it exists, and that the Jack Martin who took this film was not the same Jack Martin who worked for Guy Banister. Actually, this John Martin was about 23 years old in 1963 (according to Harold Weisberg's associate, Gary Schoener) although the FBI claimed he was only 17.

John Martin also admitted to Weisberg and Schoener that he was a member of the Minutemen organization, too, and we know that General Walker was an officer in the Minutemen. John Martin also said he served under Walker in the 24th Infantry Division in Germany. (Weisberg and Schoener did not follow-up the Walker connection back in 1968, because they were too busy trying to identify people in the crowd during the Oswald-Bringuier episode.)

My speculation is that young John Martin made this film on behalf of General Walker in August of 1963. The film makes a visual connection between the April 10th shooting and the (later to be identified) shooter, Lee Harvey Oswald. It is part of a political frame-up, in my opinion.

If this is correct, then it directly implicates General Walker in activities involving Oswald before 11/22/1963.

Best regards,

--Paul Trejo

Paul, I was unaware of this reply and just saw it today as I was looking for an older post. There appear to be several interesting Jack/John Martins in the JFK case.

I have never seen the film referenced above. Feel free to update me if you are able to locate it.

It would add a significant dimension to the Walker story.

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Paul, I was unaware of this reply and just saw it today as I was looking for an older post. There appear to be several interesting Jack/John Martins in the JFK case.

I have never seen the film referenced above. Feel free to update me if you are able to locate it.

It would add a significant dimension to the Walker story.

Richard, I personally asked Gary Schoener for a copy of his copy -- and he said he would deliver it to me as soon as he finds it. It is currenty lost in his archives.

As soon as I receive it, I will share it with this Forum. It is one of my goals.

For a little more information about the film (including input from Gary Schoener, who was Harold Weisberg's associate all those years ago) this Forum had a thread about a month ago at this URL:

http://educationforum.ipbhost.com/index.php?showtopic=18431

For a more detailed Timeline of General Walker, this Forum had a thread about two months ago on at this URL:

http://educationforum.ipbhost.com/index.php?showtopic=18625

I'm impressed by the Walker history because the following sources claimed that former General Edwin A. Walker was the ringleader of the JFK assassination: (i) Jack Ruby; (ii) Frank Ellsworth [ATF]; and (iii) Harry Dean [in this Forum]. Also, Dick Russell suspected that Walker might have been the ringleader. This combined testimony -- all by itself -- merits more research.

Also, the material evidence reveals multiple letters by General Walker trying too hard to portray Oswald, RFK and the CIA trying to kill him, and his belief that he outsmarted them all as proved by the death of JFK.

Add to this the hatred that General Walker expressed for the Kennedy Administration in his many speeches around the USA for three years prior to 11/22/1963. Also, Walker's hatred of RFK for making him a 'political prisoner' in an insane asylum on 10/01/1962 was a violation he could never forgive or forget.

Add to this the John Martin film -- and I am convinced that far too little research has been done on this topic in the past 48 years.

Best regards,

--Paul Trejo

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