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Bob Dylan song about JFK assassination


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5 hours ago, W. Niederhut said:

  Here's one of my covers of a song from that album, about Dylan's tour of Mississippi with Pete Seeger during the Civil Rights era-- Mississippi.

https://www.soundclick.com/music/songInfo.cfm?songID=13466275

 

What an excellent remake of Dylan's song. Hat off to you, sir.

Edited by Andrej Stancak
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6 hours ago, David Andrews said:

 

In other Dylan-era singer-songwriter news: 73-year-old John Prine tests positive for Coronavirus, is in critical condition..

 

Thats awful, i hope he recovers. Along the lines if this thread, if you havent heard Prines cover of “Thats how Every Empire Falls”, I recommend it. Very moving version.

 

 

”There’s a slow train coming”

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6 hours ago, Andrej Stancak said:

What an excellent remake of Dylan's song. Hat off to you, sir.

Thanks, Andrej.   Playing (and recording) Dylan's songs has been a "hobby" of mine for almost 50 years.

One of my sisters bought the Columbia 45 rpm record of Like A Rolling Stone the year it came out, and I probably listened to it 500 times.

I think the flip side was Rainy Day Woman or (?) Gates of Eden.

 

 

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7 hours ago, Paul Brancato said:

Tell us more about your group.

Paul,

    My "group" is a one man basement (studio) band-- guitars, keyboards, violin, mandolin, banjo, drums, harmonica, accordion, etc.  My toys.

    I started out by studying violin as a boy, then focused on the guitar in my teens-- against the advice of my elderly violin teacher, Howard Reynolds, who had once been the Concert Master of the Denver Symphony back in the day.  Maestro Reynolds was right.  I became a musical Jack-of-all-trades and master of none-- a dilettante.

   Lately, during this COVID-19 shut down, I've been trying to remember how to play some violin pieces from my youth-- Mazas Duets, Acolay Concerto, etc.-- but it's not like remembering how to ride a bicycle.  It sounds like I'm strangling a chicken.

   As you know better than anyone around here, there's nothing quite as beautiful as a well-played violin, and nothing quite as awful as one that is played badly.

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1 hour ago, W. Niederhut said:

Paul,

    My "group" is a one man basement (studio) band-- guitars, keyboards, violin, mandolin, banjo, drums, harmonica, accordion, etc.  My toys.

    I started out by studying violin as a boy, then focused on the guitar in my teens-- against the advice of my elderly violin teacher, Howard Reynolds, who had once been the Concert Master of the Denver Symphony back in the day.  Maestro Reynolds was right.  I became a musical Jack-of-all-trades and master of none-- a dilettante.

   Lately, during this COVID-19 shut down, I've been trying to remember how to play some violin pieces from my youth-- Mazas Duets, Acolay Concerto, etc.-- but it's not like remembering how to ride a bicycle.  It sounds like I'm strangling a chicken.

   As you know better than anyone around here, there's nothing quite as beautiful as a well-played violin, and nothing quite as awful as one that is played badly.

You’re bio here doesn’t mention your musical skills, which are considerable. You have a knowledge base I’m completely lacking in - technology. This hiatus from my job is doing wonders for my violin playing, similar to a sabbatical I took a decade ago in which I surprised myself by practicing more than I had in years. As much as I love my job and my colleagues I find the daily orchestral grind depletes my enthusiasm. I sound better now than I have in a long time. 

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On 3/29/2020 at 8:53 AM, Denny Zartman said:

Don't worry, Mr. President, help's on the way
Your brothers are comin', there'll be hell to pay
Brothers? What brothers? What's this about hell?
Tell them, "We're waiting, keep coming," we'll get them as well

 

If RFK is one of the brothers they "got" as well, who was the other?

Maybe they got Teddy by setting him up at Chappaquiddick. That is, both RFK and Teddy were deprived the presidency as well.

Or is there a better interpretation?

 

Edited by Sandy Larsen
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4 hours ago, W. Niederhut said:

Paul,

    My "group" is a one man basement (studio) band-- guitars, keyboards, violin, mandolin, banjo, drums, harmonica, accordion, etc.  My toys.

    I started out by studying violin as a boy, then focused on the guitar in my teens-- against the advice of my elderly violin teacher, Howard Reynolds, who had once been the Concert Master of the Denver Symphony back in the day.  Maestro Reynolds was right.  I became a musical Jack-of-all-trades and master of none-- a dilettante.

   Lately, during this COVID-19 shut down, I've been trying to remember how to play some violin pieces from my youth-- Mazas Duets, Acolay Concerto, etc.-- but it's not like remembering how to ride a bicycle.  It sounds like I'm strangling a chicken.

   As you know better than anyone around here, there's nothing quite as beautiful as a well-played violin, and nothing quite as awful as one that is played badly.

I think I may have for some reason told this story on here before.  I haven't admitted it to many over the years.

About the time of the JFK assassination my mother decided I needed to learn to play some sort of musical instrument, I was about 7.  A man came to the house with it seems like a set of bongo drums, a tambourine, a guitar maybe a couple of more smaller instruments.  Based on the bongo's I chose the drum's.  Mother nixed that idea.  As she was self taught and had played the piano in church choir's a couple of times she signed me up for evening lessons at the University of Denver.  I supposedly had some potential per the instructor as i could play in part by ear.  I didn't like to practice but did like a boogie woogie song in particular.  I progressed well enough to reach a recital. There were 5-6 girls and I think 3 boys.  They were taught to curtsy after their performance and we were  taught to bow.  The girls all went first then I was the first boy.  Did fine with the teachers selection.  Then like all the girl's I'd just watched I curtsied.

It brought down the house.  I refused to practice anymore.  Dad took my side, I think he was embarrassed too. 

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          Good story, Ron.  BTW, I love boogie woogie piano music, but I never had a "left hand like God."  It's an indigenous American musical style that, apparently, originated among freed men-- former slaves-- in Texas and Arkansas, I believe.   The word may derive from a West African term for running amok-- bukki wukki, or something.  The late, great Albert Ammons was a pioneer and master of that genre.

         Your story about your mother and the musical instruments also reminded me of a funny story about Jerry Garcia.  His mother once bought Jerry an accordion for his birthday.  He was so disappointed that his stepfather agreed to exchange the accordion for an electric guitar at a local pawn shop in San Francisco.

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Sad story, Joe.   You've, obviously, experienced a lot of serious trauma.

1 hour ago, David Andrews said:

That sounds like a Dylan line: "Always lock your French horn case at night."


Or, perhaps in the style of Subterranean Homesick Blues, "The horn won't blow if they vomit on the gromit."

But, seriously, Joe, it's a very sad story.  Your childhood sounds extremely traumatic.

As for Paul's comment, (above) it hadn't occurred to me that even professional musicians in major symphony orchestras can get burned out by the demands of their daily work.  I've probably had a romanticized view of the exalted life of artists in major symphonies.  They always look so distinguished on stage, and I've imagined them pouring over their daily opuses (opii?) with a glass of cognac, thinking, "Hmmmm.... shall I start with the Berlioz or the Tchaikovsky today?"

 

Edited by W. Niederhut
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8 hours ago, Sandy Larsen said:

 

If RFK is one of the brothers they "got" as well, who was the other?

Maybe they got Teddy by setting him up at Chappaquiddick. That is, both RFK and Teddy were deprived the presidency as well.

Or is there a better interpretation?

 

Maybe not better but a different possibility.  Only Dylan knows for sure his meaning.

But maybe "brothers" is meant along the lines of Bro, Brothers in Arms so to speak or in this case maybe Brothers in Peace.  In that context it could include RFK, MLK and Malcolm X.  Just food for thought. 

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10 hours ago, Sandy Larsen said:

 

If RFK is one of the brothers they "got" as well, who was the other?

Maybe they got Teddy by setting him up at Chappaquiddick. That is, both RFK and Teddy were deprived the presidency as well.

Or is there a better interpretation?

 

Martin Luther King

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