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Bob Dylan song about JFK assassination


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2 hours ago, James DiEugenio said:

My review/discussion of Murder Most Foul.  What a work of lyrical composition.  NO wonder the MSM is trying to avoid what it says.

 

https://kennedysandking.com/john-f-kennedy-articles/the-dylan-kennedy-sensation

Great job, Jim.  I especially like the intro where you say it looks like Dylan wrote this specifically for people informed about the case.  It sure does seem like that.

As an aside, I do think Dylan wouldn't go to all this trouble without at least pointing to who he thinks the perps were. Here's where I think that is in the song/poem:

Where we ask no quarter, and no quarter do we give
We're right down the street, from the street where you live”

This is when Dylan has taken on the voice of the conspirators in the song.  They're talking to JFK - the street where he lives is Pennsylvania Avenue.  They are right down the street, which means they are DC based and this is a federal government conspiracy.

Notice he doesn't say "on the street where you live."  That would point to the FBI which is headquartered on Pennsylvania.

But "right down the street" and after the military jargon of 'no quarter' in the lyric?  I'd say Dylan is referring to the Pentagon.  

What I really like about Dylan's song is he doesn't fret about 'figuring out' the ambush.  It was a well-planned trick by experts who know how to do this work.  That is the best explanation of the operation at Dealey.  You don't need to know anything more on that front.  It's just a distraction.  Neither the official version nor any alternative version tells a believable story.  It's all confusion.  Which is what happens when a crime is purposefully covered up from the start by local and federal authorities.

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1 hour ago, James DiEugenio said:

Thanks Ron.  From my undergraduate days as an English minor.

Excellent, indeed.  This review should be re-published on multiple media websites.

I wonder if Salon.com, Huffington Post, Alternet.org, Common Dreams.org, and/or Rolling Stone would re-print it.

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1 hour ago, Michaleen Kilroy said:

Great job, Jim.  I especially like the intro where you say it looks like Dylan wrote this specifically for people informed about the case.  It sure does seem like that.

As an aside, I do think Dylan wouldn't go to all this trouble without at least pointing to who he thinks the perps were. Here's where I think that is in the song/poem:

Where we ask no quarter, and no quarter do we give
We're right down the street, from the street where you live”

This is when Dylan has taken on the voice of the conspirators in the song.  They're talking to JFK - the street where he lives is Pennsylvania Avenue.  They are right down the street, which means they are DC based and this is a federal government conspiracy.

Notice he doesn't say "on the street where you live."  That would point to the FBI which is headquartered on Pennsylvania.

But "right down the street" and after the military jargon of 'no quarter' in the lyric?  I'd say Dylan is referring to the Pentagon.  

What I really like about Dylan's song is he doesn't fret about 'figuring out' the ambush.  It was a well-planned trick by experts who know how to do this work.  That is the best explanation of the operation at Dealey.  You don't need to know anything more on that front.  It's just a distraction.  Neither the official version nor any alternative version tells a believable story.  It's all confusion.  Which is what happens when a crime is purposefully covered up from the start by local and federal authorities.

Very interesting deduction. 

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On 3/30/2020 at 7:16 PM, James DiEugenio said:

My review/discussion of Murder Most Foul.  What a work of lyrical composition.  NO wonder the MSM is trying to avoid what it says.

 

https://kennedysandking.com/john-f-kennedy-articles/the-dylan-kennedy-sensation

Great essay.

Hope some national news and commentary venue picks it up.

Edited by Joe Bauer
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I have to say, other people have pointed out things I missed.  I never meant it to be comprehensive.

But to show just one example, in the fourth line before the end, Dylan mentions the song about Sherman's march to the sea called Marching through Georgia.  He then mentions a Scottish ode.

  In that song, the person being lamented is named Johnny.

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On 3/30/2020 at 11:14 PM, Michaleen Kilroy said:

Where we ask no quarter, and no quarter do we give
We're right down the street, from the street where you live”

 

I wasn't aware of the meaning of "give no quarter." So I looked it up and found it to be a military saying that means to show no mercy and to take no prisoners, i.e. kill all the enemies. And what military would that be? Dylan gives their address in the line that follows.

You got that spot on, Michaleen.

Edited by Sandy Larsen
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51 minutes ago, Sandy Larsen said:

 

I wasn't aware of the meaning of "give no quarter." So I looked it up and found it to be a military saying that means to show no mercy and to take no prisoners, i.e. kill all the enemies. And what military would that be? Dylan gives their address in the following line.

You got that spot on, Michaleen.

 

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3 hours ago, James DiEugenio said:

I have to say, other people have pointed out things I missed.  I never meant it to be comprehensive.

But to show just one example, in the fourth line before the end, Dylan mentions the song about Sherman's march to the sea called Marching through Georgia.  He then mentions a Scottish ode.

  In that song, the person being lamented is named Johnny.

Old crow Medicine Show does a rousing version

https://youtu.be/9nEf2nuH_Xc

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From Suze Rotolo’s book:

“ Bobby, Carla, and I were together at the Avenue B apartment sitting on the rickety wicker couch, cigarettes in hand, in front of the old black-and-white television set to watch Lee Harvey Oswald, the alleged lone assassin, be arraigned. We watched him get shot right there, live, on national TV. If we’d turned to flick an ash, we would have missed it.

Chaos ensued, both on TV and everywhere else.

Did you see that?

The three of us froze and went deadly serious. There was no instant replay; these were the days before video cameras. The attack had been captured on film. The news commentators would have to explain what they saw or knew until the film was processed. Bob barely spoke and could not leave the TV. He was fastened to it. Everyone was.”

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5 hours ago, Sandy Larsen said:

 

I wasn't aware of the meaning of "give no quarter." So I looked it up and found it to be a military saying that means to show no mercy and to take no prisoners, i.e. kill all the enemies. And what military would that be? Dylan gives their address in the following line.

You got that spot on, Michaleen.

Hi Sandy.  I know you posted a while back about some health problems.  Nice to see you on here, I've always enjoyed your posts and found them informative.  As an aside not meant to distract from the thread topic, "Tarleton's Quarter" became a rallying cry in the Revolutionary War in South Carolina as a result of Tarleton's no quarter.  Kind of like Remember the Alamo.  The Patriots often gave no quarter afterwards.  Inspiring them to victory at Kings Mountain.  Which I believe it was Ben Franklin who thought it was the final decisive victory of the revolution.  The Red Coat's left shortly after.  I just read about this recently myself.

 https://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/tarleton-gives-quarter-in-south-carolina

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