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Heroes of the Kennedy Assassination Research Effort


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5 minutes ago, John Butler said:

Thanks for posting this.  I don't know Ed Tatro.  Could you give a brief account of his work.

 
Edgar F. Tatro is one of today's preeminent experts on the Kennedy Assassination. Tatro holds a B.A. Degree in English, an M.A. in Urban Education and a ...
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18 hours ago, John Butler said:

Here are some names listed by members:

Gaeton Fonzi

John Newman

Sylvia Meagher

Mae Brussell

Anthony Summers

Cyril Wecht

Penn Jones

Robert Tanenbaum

and others I have thought of:

Robert Groden

David Lifton

L. Fletcher Prouty

Oliver Stone

Harold Weisberg

Judith Baker

William Weston

and some folks on the Forum:

David Josephs

John Kowalski

Bart Kamp

Jim DiEugenio

Please list other worthy folks.  I have noticed nobody from the other side has made the list.

 

There are more names suggested by Forum Members:

John Hunt

Cliff Varnell

David Talbot

Doug Horne

Michael Chesser

Walt Brown

Ed Tatro-  The JFK Conference The Big Event.  Edgar F. Tatro is one of the pre-eminent experts on the Kennedy Assassination. 

Greg Burnham

Vincent Salandria

Peter Dale Scott

E. Martin Schotz

Anna Marie Kuhns Walko

Jerry Rose

Gary Shaw

Wallace Milam

Debra Conway

Malcolm Blunt

Rex Bradford

Bill Simpich

Bob Dorff

Stu Wexler

 

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25 minutes ago, John Butler said:

Cliff,

I don't recognize E. Martin Schotz.  Could you give a brief statement on his research.

Here’s his 1998 COPA Conference address:

https://www.ratical.org/ratville/JFK/FalseMystery/COPA1998EMS.html

Over and over again we hear people asking for more and more information from the government. I suggest to you that the problem is not that we have insufficient data. The problem is that we dare not analyze the data we have had all along. In fact we need very little data. Honestly, as far as I’m concerned you can throw almost the whole 26 volumes of the Warren Commission in the trash can. All you need to do is look at this.

 

Commission Exhibit 385
Commission Exhibit 385 
           Supplemental Report exhibit 59
Supplemental Report exhibit 59

Here [on the left] is the Warren Commission drawing of the path of the “magic” bullet. And here [on the right] is a photograph of the hole in the President’s jacket.

Now what does this tell us? It tells us without a shadow of a doubt that the President’s throat wound was an entry wound, and that there was a conspiracy without any question. But it tells us much more. It tells us that the Warren Commission knew that the conspiracy was obvious and that the Commission was engaged in a criminal conspiracy after the fact to obstruct justice. The Chief Justice of the United States was a criminal accessory to the murder of the President. Senator Arlen Specter is a criminal accessory to murder. The Warren Report was not a mistake; it was and is an obvious act of criminal fraud.[5]  </q>

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18 minutes ago, Cliff Varnell said:

Here’s his 1998 COPA Conference address:

https://www.ratical.org/ratville/JFK/FalseMystery/COPA1998EMS.html

Over and over again we hear people asking for more and more information from the government. I suggest to you that the problem is not that we have insufficient data. The problem is that we dare not analyze the data we have had all along. In fact we need very little data. Honestly, as far as I’m concerned you can throw almost the whole 26 volumes of the Warren Commission in the trash can. All you need to do is look at this.

 

Commission Exhibit 385
Commission Exhibit 385 
           Supplemental Report exhibit 59
Supplemental Report exhibit 59

Here [on the left] is the Warren Commission drawing of the path of the “magic” bullet. And here [on the right] is a photograph of the hole in the President’s jacket.

Now what does this tell us? It tells us without a shadow of a doubt that the President’s throat wound was an entry wound, and that there was a conspiracy without any question. But it tells us much more. It tells us that the Warren Commission knew that the conspiracy was obvious and that the Commission was engaged in a criminal conspiracy after the fact to obstruct justice. The Chief Justice of the United States was a criminal accessory to the murder of the President. Senator Arlen Specter is a criminal accessory to murder. The Warren Report was not a mistake; it was and is an obvious act of criminal fraud.[5]  </q>

Couldn't agree more.  The Chief Justice of the United States is a man.  Subject to the fallacies of man.  Some good and some bad.  As far as I am concerned the Warren Court is responsible for many of the ills of our society.  There again some good some bad.

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Yikes. I'm surprised about the quality of this list. To me, a "hero" is not someone who is primarily focused on promoting themselves and/or their theories, but someone who acquires and shares previously hidden information.

To that end, there are really only a few true "heroes" on this case.

I would nominate Harold Weisberg, Jim Lesar, Mary Ferrell, Rex Bradford, Malcolm Blunt, Debra Conway, and John Hunt, for starters. For those not in the know, Weisberg and his attorney Lesar freed more JFK assassination documents via the Freedom of Information Act than all the other researchers (and media conglomerates) combined. He then shared these documents with other researchers. Ferrell collected tons of stuff from the very beginning, and then shared her collection with others. Bradford created the historymatters and Mary Ferrell Foundation websites, without which a ridiculously ill-informed research community would be even more ignorant. (Note that Ollie Curme deserves honorable mention for funding the Ferrell site.) Blunt dug through the archives for years, and is now sharing much of his stash via Bart Kamp on the DPUK website. Debra Conway is basically JFK Lancer--which still hosts a valuable website, but which once hosted a much-belated research forum, and yearly conferences. John Hunt is a bit trickier. As noted by Gary Murr, John scanned tons of otherwise unavailable and basically unknown documents at the archives, and shared many of these with the public via his online posts, research papers and presentations. The trouble is he'd promised, going back to when I first met him in 2004, to share all of these materials with the public for free, but never got around to doing so before his untimely demise. (So it's kinda like looking a gift horse in the mouth. John gave us a lot. But he had so much more to give.)

If one is to move to a second round, moreover, one need not look further than our very own Gary Murr and Larry Hancock, who have both increased our understanding of the case, and shared previously unseen documents and images. Bravo Gary and Larry.

 

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2 hours ago, John Butler said:

Steve,

I don't know these two ladies.  Could you give a brief account of their work?

John,

https://www.jstor.org/stable/24916337?seq=1

Journal Article
The Truth Is Out There: Citizen Sleuths from the Kennedy Assassination to the 9/11 Truth Movement
KATHRYN S. OLMSTED
image.png.2f7ec0b0d8f44a2e211c480276013c4a.png
John,
Not all heroes write books.
Steve Thomas
Edited by Steve Thomas
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All the people listed in previous posts deserve credit for their contributions. The list is desperately incomplete but I take is as an opportunity to express our appreciation to these researchers. Some of the missed ones are well-known (Joseph McBride,  Dick Russell, Josiah Thompson,  Barry Ernest, Tom Wilson, James Douglas, Noel Twyman) and some perhaps less famous but they gave it all (e.g., Larry Harris).

I would not call them heroes of JFK research though. These people followed their calling and accomplished a lot. However, none of them needed to demonstrate the kind of heroism that Roger Craig had to. While many deserve credit, the real hero was Roger Craig who put his job, health and maybe even life on the altar of JFKA case. Heroism is not measured by number of pages written or conferences attended even if these measures can be useful for giving credit to individual researchers.

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I would like to add Sherry Fiester to the list for her incredible work on trajectories.  Being on site, standing near (~15' in the picture below I took in February 2019) the south end of the walkway over the triple underpass makes shot(s) coming from there as she posits in her book really come to life.

F6MD8Vm.jpg

Thanks

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4 hours ago, Pat Speer said:

Yikes. I'm surprised about the quality of this list. To me, a "hero" is not someone who is primarily focused on promoting themselves and/or their theories, but someone who acquires and shares previously hidden information.

To that end, there are really only a few true "heroes" on this case.

I would nominate Harold Weisberg, Jim Lesar, Mary Ferrell, Rex Bradford, Malcolm Blunt, Debra Conway, and John Hunt, for starters. For those not in the know, Weisberg and his attorney Lesar freed more JFK assassination documents via the Freedom of Information Act than all the other researchers (and media conglomerates) combined. He then shared these documents with other researchers. Ferrell collected tons of stuff from the very beginning, and then shared her collection with others. Bradford created the historymatters and Mary Ferrell Foundation websites, without which a ridiculously ill-informed research community would be even more ignorant. (Note that Ollie Curme deserves honorable mention for funding the Ferrell site.) Blunt dug through the archives for years, and is now sharing much of his stash via Bart Kamp on the DPUK website. Debra Conway is basically JFK Lancer--which still hosts a valuable website, but which once hosted a much-belated research forum, and yearly conferences. John Hunt is a bit trickier. As noted by Gary Murr, John scanned tons of otherwise unavailable and basically unknown documents at the archives, and shared many of these with the public via his online posts, research papers and presentations. The trouble is he'd promised, going back to when I first met him in 2004, to share all of these materials with the public for free, but never got around to doing so before his untimely demise. (So it's kinda like looking a gift horse in the mouth. John gave us a lot. But he had so much more to give.)

If one is to move to a second round, moreover, one need not look further than our very own Gary Murr and Larry Hancock, who have both increased our understanding of the case, and shared previously unseen documents and images. Bravo Gary and Larry.

 

Thanks Pat,

I started this because I knew that I would not be able to recall all of the worthy people who should be noted for their work.  Then, I got the notion that a short blurb should be put by the person's name listing something of their effort for folks who have just developed an interest in the topic so they would have some idea of what people have done in the past.  I've just started on this and have a couple on entries such as :

Jim Garrison- James Carothers Garrison (born Earling Carothers Garrison; November 20, 1921 – October 21, 1992) - District Attorney in New Orleans from 1962 to 1973.  He is best known for his investigations into the assassination of President John F. Kennedy by trying Clay Shaw as an assassination co-conspirator.  Wrote a best-seller in 1988, On The Trail Of The Assassins.

Mark Lane- is best known as a leading Kennedy Assassination researcher and author. Lane wrote many books on the assassination.  The best know is The Warren Commission, Rush to Judgement.  His last book was Last Word: My Indictment of the CIA in the Murder of JFK, published in 2011.

So, if anyone wants to help I'll try to collate the collection of comments and post them all at once. 

Edited by John Butler
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3 hours ago, Andrej Stancak said:

I would not call them heroes of JFK research though. These people followed their calling and accomplished a lot. However, none of them needed to demonstrate the kind of heroism that Roger Craig had to. While many deserve credit, the real hero was Roger Craig who put his job, health and maybe even life on the altar of JFKA case. Heroism is not measured by number of pages written or conferences attended even if these measures can be useful for giving credit to individual researchers

I agree and disagree.  Roger Craig should be listed as a Hero of Heroes.  As far as others, I think others should be noted for their efforts and putting themselves forward with their ideas on the Kennedy Assassination.  This is a rough business and not for the thin skinned. 

I've forgotten who Barry Ernst is.  I don't know Tom Wilson and Larry Harris.  Could you make a brief comment on these folks?

Edited by John Butler
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