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3 hours ago, Steve Thomas said:

Those dirty Lefties! Will their diabolical plans stop at nothing?

 

Nolte: Howard Stern Proves Democrats Want Unvaccinated Trump Voters Dead

by John Nolte 10 Sep 2021
https://www.breitbart.com/entertainment/2021/09/10/nolte-howard-stern-proves-democrats-want-unvaccinated-trump-voters-dead/
 

“Do you want to know why I think Howard Stern is going full-monster with his mockery of three fellow human beings who died of the coronavirus? Because leftists like Stern and CNNLOL and Joe Biden and Nancy Pelosi and Anthony Fauci are deliberately looking to manipulate Trump supporters into not getting vaccinated.

Nothing else makes sense to me.

In a country where elections are decided on razor-thin margins, does it not benefit one side if their opponents simply drop dead?

If I wanted to use reverse psychology to convince people not to get a life-saving vaccination, I would do exactly what Stern and the left are doing… I would bully and taunt and mock and ridicule you for not getting vaccinated, knowing the human response would be, Hey, xxxx you, I’m never getting vaccinated!

And why is that a perfectly human response? Because no one ever wants to feel like they are being bullied or ridiculed or mocked or pushed into doing anything.”

 

“The push for mandates is another ploy to get us to dig in and not do what’s best for ourselves because no one wants to feel like they’re caving to a mandate.”

 

“No one wants to cave to a piece of dooky like that, or a scumbag like Fauci, or any of the scumbags at CNNLOL, so we don’t. And what’s the result? They’re all vaccinated, and we’re not! And when you look at the numbers, the only numbers that matter, which is who’s dying, it’s overwhelmingly the unvaccinated who are dying, and they have just manipulated millions of their political enemies into the unvaccinated camp. “

 

“I could be wrong.

Maybe the left isn’t that evil and sly.

Even if this isn’t the left’s plan, who’s owning who?”

 

Steve Thomas

 
Exactly Steve, these guys would sooner die so they could say post mortem that they were never "owned by the libs". then the "libs" will be attacked  for trying to give them healthy advice. Does that smack of paternalism?
 
Life is real. Though it's particularly hard to convince low risk groups, of which this guy wasn't.
 
 Honestly this is not for Libs. but for the anti covid vaccine people. Cambridge educated attorney Les Lawrenson learned online of the dangers of getting "the jab" and then caught covid and started a video journal of his handling of the disease  in order to show that covid was "no worse than the flu" and that we should all, like him trust our immune systems. 9 days later he's dead. Scroll down to his early accounts.
 

https://inews.co.uk/news/covid-vaccine-man-refused-died-mistake-partner-leslie-lawrenson-1136559

 

 

His family pleads with others to not make the same mistakes.

 

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The Jordan Hayes story is relevant here. He completely screwed over his family by getting himself injected and leaving his wife with medical bills she wont be able to pay. Good thing he virtue signaled to his lib Twitter followers before finding out the vaccine “worked” on him. 

 

https://thecovidblog.com/2021/07/26/jordan-hayes-33-year-old-new-york-man-calls-the-non-vaccinated-idiots-and-morons-dead-14-weeks-after-covid-19-vaccine/

 

btw, official MA CDC data has 34% of the currently hospitalized patients as “fully vaccinated”. Of course, there is a built in perversion of the data because anyone in the hospital for a vaccine reaction within 14 days is listed as unvaccinated. So 34% is low. By how much is the only question. Also, vaccinated people are only tested if they are hospitalized, and are tested at a leas sensitive level than unvaxxed. This is a joke of scientific inquiry. But go on thinking this is about democrats and republicans if you have to. 
 

At least the NEJM has some level of integrity.

https://www.thegatewaypundit.com/2021/09/new-england-journal-medicine-backtracks-now-admits-covid-vax-may-not-safe-pregnant-women/

still waiting on the testing/vaccine mandates for people illegally flowing over the border….

Edited by Dennis Berube
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https://thecovidblog.com/2021/07/26/jordan-hayes-33-year-old-new-york-man-calls-the-non-vaccinated-idiots-and-morons-dead-14-weeks-after-covid-19-vaccine/

Dennis,I'm only taking what you're giving me here with this article and website.
Of course, people die all the time, and never once  is it even mentioned specifically that he died of covid. That's quite an omission!! And we don't have the testimonials of his family as to what he died of.  I checked his gofundme page.
 
On the site, they claim
-Masks are harmful
-Hydrochloriquene and Ivermectin approved, with that same Jamaican woman. (Ok, I don't care. go ahead!)
 
-Then other claims, of course  the vaccine is also responsible for dementia, skin disorders, pericarditis. But the spike protein is deadly, or almost deadly, but there is one cure. It can be cured by drinking white pine needle tea and wouldn't you know, they sell white pine needles!
 
 

But talk about an "own the libs echo chamber" website! Complete with the tired cliches like "virtue signaling", and  all the buzzwords.

-"Breitbart approved"

-"We don't believe in the Russian hoax"--(Oh good, then they must be qualified to talk to me about vaccines!)

-"there’s really no proof that COVID-19 exists (most COVID deaths are the flu)."   
So... the plandemic??? So I guess we now have to ask whose fomenting this? hoo boy!                     
Maybe Lawrenson read this blog.
 

-Donate!

You can usually tell a fledgling website by how readily they throw out pitches for even the most remote political endorsements.

Dennis I assume you don't have any such cases close to yourself, or you would have said so. And you don't have any background in this. So why believe this one person and website with the most ominous covid vaccine prognosis for which they have the only cure? Anybody can write a book or an article.
 
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[BE SURE TO READ THE SECOND TO THE LAST PARAGRAPH THAT RELATES TO OSWALD]

 

HISTORY CORNER: SNIPERS: THE MOST FEARED WARRIORS
“One man can change the world with a bullet in the right place.” — Malcolm McDowell
During the Vietnam War, the North Vietnamese had a $30,000 bounty on the head of U.S. Marine Corps sniper Gunnery Sergeant Carlos N. Hathcock. Usually, they only offered from $8 to $2,000 for killing an American sniper.
Hathcock was special. He was a legend in the jungle — for both sides, and the communists had to take him out. They couldn’t.
Here’s how he worked:
Hathcock volunteered for a dangerous mission before he even knew what it was.Camouflaged with local vegetation, he crawled inch-by-inch across a grass-covered meadow into the enemy camp to kill a North Vietnamese Army general.
It took him four days and three nights to get there. The days were tropical hot and humid. There were always insects. And there was no time to sleep.
While creeping through the tall grass, he was almost bitten by a bamboo viper — a nasty little green snake with an extremely painful bite. A wound would feel “as if it had been branded with a hot iron, and the pain does not subside until about 24 hours after being bitten (and) within minutes…the surrounding flesh dies and turns black.”
While watching the serpent, Hathcock didn’t move a muscle — not wishing to give away his position. The snake slithered away and the Marine kept crawling.
Just after sunset, as he lay motionless and camouflaged in the foliage, an enemy soldier almost stepped on him. He was about 700 yards away when the general emerged from his quarters onto the porch and took a stretch.
“I thought to myself, ‘This'll be good…really good,’” he said.
Carefully lining up his target in the crosshairs of his scope, Hathcock slowly squeezed the trigger. The shot hit the general square in the chest.
Mission accomplished!
Hathcock would boldly challenge the enemy snipers looking for him by wearing a white feather in his hat band. They called him “Trắng Lông,” meaning “White Feather Sniper.”
Hathcock’s fellow Marines protected him by also wearing a white feather — and risking their own lives, while confusing the enemy counter-snipers searching for him.
One report said that he killed every known Vietnamese marksman who tried to collect the bounty.
On another mission, Hathcock and his spotter, John Roland Burke, were stalking an enemy sniper in the jungle southwest of Da Nang. A commie sniper they called “The Cobra," had already killed several Marines and was believed to be looking for Hathcock. Hathcock saw him first. Seeing a glint in the sunlight of the enemy’s scope, Hathcock took aim and fired. The bullet went right through the scope and hit him in the eye — killing him instantly.
Hathcock brought the dead sniper’s gun back to camp as a trophy — but somebody stole it.
By the time he was sent back to the U.S. in 1969 having suffered severe burns while rescuing seven Marines from a burning vehicle, he’d killed 93 enemy combatants — maybe hundreds more that couldn’t be confirmed under military protocols.
While serving as a combat commander in Vietnam, retired Marine Corps Lieutenant Colonel and Annapolis graduate Kenny Moore of Hayden was part of a staff conference that included talking about the best firing techniques.
Hathcock said, “Breathe in…breath out…relax… then squeeze.”
“That’d be easy for him,” Moore said. “He had a heartbeat of only 41.”
It takes incredible training and mental toughness to become a military sniper.
Shooters and spotters are trained to work as a team, with the objective of hitting the enemy target with one shot. Before they take that shot however, there are a lot of variables that must be factored in — such as type of gun and ammunition used, distance to target, point of impact, bullet trajectory, wind conditions, humidity, elevation and even the Coriolis Force caused by the Earth’s rotation, and other factors.
Some of this is calculated by electronic and optical equipment — the rest by the sniper and spotter. Handheld computers with ballistic-prediction software help contribute to the accuracy. All of this has to be calculated quickly: adjusting the rifle for the conditions and shooting before anything changes, or the target moves.
Snipers and spotters go through rigorous physical and academic training to do all this.
They are elite warriors of the Modern Age.
U.S. Army Staff Sergeant Adelbert “Bert” Waldron of Virginia was another one of them.
He served in Vietnam as a sniper with the 9th Infantry Division, and during his eight-month tour of duty had 109 confirmed kills — the most by any American sniper during the Vietnam War.
His job in Nam was to ride shotgun on a U.S. Navy Tango “brown-water” boat in the highly dangerous Mekong Delta, infested with communist Viet Cong guerillas.
“Allied troops would launch countless search and destroy operations throughout South Vietnam in an effort to break the insurgency,” said a report in Military History Bunker, “but the VC would simply melt away into the jungles and villages…
“The VC utilized classic guerrilla tactics of ambushes, hit-and-run attacks, booby traps, bombings, and snipers to gradually inflict losses on Allied troops.
“While the Americans and their allies roamed openly in the daylight, the VC and North Vietnamese Army owned the night.”
But one night as his boat was moving along the river, Waldron shot and killed an enemy sniper in a tree 900 yards away. He was good at shooting at night. On another night, his recon patrol ran into about 40 armed Viet Cong, and a battle broke out.
Ignoring the danger, he left the patrol to take a sniper position. With his night vision scope, he could see the VC moving in the dark. He killed and wounded so many of them that they disappeared into the jungle. That earned him a Bronze Star with a “V” for Valor.
Three nights later, he was camouflaged in a sniper location when he spotted a large group of Viet Cong. Stealthily moving from one position to the next through the rice paddies, he killed 11 of them — making them think they were being attacked by multiple shooters.
He held them off for three hours before he pulled out. His actions won him the Silver Star — the military’s third highest decoration.
Bert Waldron died in obscurity in California in 1995 at age 62.
The most amazing long-range sniper shot in history took place from a tower in Baghdad in 2017.
Using a McMillan TAC-50 rifle, a Canadian sniper (unnamed for security reasons) from Joint Task Force 2 fired a shot that killed an Islamic State (IS) insurgent attacking Iraqi forces 3,871 yards away — almost 39 football fields. Video cameras and other information verified the kill.
During the Civil War, an unidentified Confederate soldier in Fort Sumter saw a Union soldier moving around 1,390 yards away at Battery Greg and took a shot at him. Probably using a Whitworth rifle, he hit the target — killing him.
Whether the shooter was a trained sniper, a good marksman, or just plain lucky is not recorded. But the deadliest American sniper in history was U.S. Navy Seal Chris Kyle from Odessa, Texas, with 160 confirmed kills in the Iraqi War. “I don’t have to psyche myself up, or do something special mentally,” he wrote in his autobiography.
“I look through the scope, get my target in the cross hairs, and kill my enemy before he kills one of my people.”
His autobiography “American Sniper” was a bestselling book, that became a hit movie starring Bradly Cooper and directed by Clint Eastwood, that received six Oscar nominations — including Best Picture.
Sadly, Kyle’s life ended tragically in 2013 at age 38 at a firing range outside Fort Worth when he and his buddy Chad Littlefield were shot and killed by a deranged ex-Marine named Eddie Ray Routh.
They’d taken Routh with them to the range to try and help him overcome personal issues and deal with his PTSD — at his mother’s request. He’d been drinking and smoking pot the previous night.
Routh, was found guilty of murder and is serving a life sentence in a Texas prison, without possibility of parole.
The nation owes a lot to our Special Forces snipers who are among the military’s most elite warriors — selflessly helping to keep America great.
Bless them all. Why a sniper has a tough job…
“Sniping is weaponized math. Although a .50 caliber sniper rifle bullet can fly as far as five miles, a host of factors…act upon the bullet as it travels. Even worse, these effects increase the farther the bullet travels. A successful sniper team operating at extreme distances must do its best to predict exactly how these factors will affect the bullet and calculate how to get the bullet back onto target.”
Where the name 'Sniper' came from…
The word appears to have originated in India in the mid-1700s, coined by the British Military when the troops were hunting the Snipe bird, which was fast and hard to shoot. Marksmen who were able to shoot the bird in flight were called “Snipers.”
U.S. Marine Corps…
"The Marine Corps has the best sniper program in the world," according to Gunnery Sergeant Richard Tisdale, staff noncommissioned officer in charge of the Scout Sniper School, with camps in California, North Carolina and Virginia. But the Army, Navy and Air Force also have snipers and might make the same claim.
What gun did Bert Waldron use in Nam?
For the gun techies: Waldron used the National Match quality M-21 with a Leatherwood 3-9X Adjustable Range Telescope (ART) graduated to 600 yards, with standard leather M1907 sling. Rock Island Arsenal converted some 1,435 of them for Vietnam in 1969, becoming the primary Army sniper rifle until 1988. The M21 was accurate to about 900 yards, firing M118 standard NATO 7.62mm rounds, using an early AN/PVS-2 Starlight night vision scope and suppressor.
Hathcock and the JFK assassination…
During the Warren Commission investigation following the assassination of President Kennedy, a mockup of the site was built at the Marine Corps sniper school at Quantico, Va., to recreate what happened. Even with the best sniper rifle, ace Marine sniper Carlos Hathcock could not duplicate assassin Lee Harvey Oswald’s fatal shot — made with a defective rifle. That finding was not included in the final Warren Report.
The book, The Giant Killer honors and highlights unique war heroes and is available on Amazon as a Paperback, Audiobook, and eBook.
Story By SYD ALBRIGHT

 

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6 hours ago, Douglas Caddy said:
Hathcock and the JFK assassination…
During the Warren Commission investigation following the assassination of President Kennedy, a mockup of the site was built at the Marine Corps sniper school at Quantico, Va., to recreate what happened. Even with the best sniper rifle, ace Marine sniper Carlos Hathcock could not duplicate assassin Lee Harvey Oswald’s fatal shot — made with a defective rifle. That finding was not included in the final Warren Report.

 

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16 hours ago, Douglas Caddy said:

[BE SURE TO READ THE SECOND TO THE LAST PARAGRAPH THAT RELATES TO OSWALD]

 

HISTORY CORNER: SNIPERS: THE MOST FEARED WARRIORS
“One man can change the world with a bullet in the right place.” — Malcolm McDowell
During the Vietnam War, the North Vietnamese had a $30,000 bounty on the head of U.S. Marine Corps sniper Gunnery Sergeant Carlos N. Hathcock. Usually, they only offered from $8 to $2,000 for killing an American sniper.
Hathcock was special. He was a legend in the jungle — for both sides, and the communists had to take him out. They couldn’t.
Here’s how he worked:
Hathcock volunteered for a dangerous mission before he even knew what it was.Camouflaged with local vegetation, he crawled inch-by-inch across a grass-covered meadow into the enemy camp to kill a North Vietnamese Army general.
It took him four days and three nights to get there. The days were tropical hot and humid. There were always insects. And there was no time to sleep.
While creeping through the tall grass, he was almost bitten by a bamboo viper — a nasty little green snake with an extremely painful bite. A wound would feel “as if it had been branded with a hot iron, and the pain does not subside until about 24 hours after being bitten (and) within minutes…the surrounding flesh dies and turns black.”
While watching the serpent, Hathcock didn’t move a muscle — not wishing to give away his position. The snake slithered away and the Marine kept crawling.
Just after sunset, as he lay motionless and camouflaged in the foliage, an enemy soldier almost stepped on him. He was about 700 yards away when the general emerged from his quarters onto the porch and took a stretch.
“I thought to myself, ‘This'll be good…really good,’” he said.
Carefully lining up his target in the crosshairs of his scope, Hathcock slowly squeezed the trigger. The shot hit the general square in the chest.
Mission accomplished!
Hathcock would boldly challenge the enemy snipers looking for him by wearing a white feather in his hat band. They called him “Trắng Lông,” meaning “White Feather Sniper.”
Hathcock’s fellow Marines protected him by also wearing a white feather — and risking their own lives, while confusing the enemy counter-snipers searching for him.
One report said that he killed every known Vietnamese marksman who tried to collect the bounty.
On another mission, Hathcock and his spotter, John Roland Burke, were stalking an enemy sniper in the jungle southwest of Da Nang. A commie sniper they called “The Cobra," had already killed several Marines and was believed to be looking for Hathcock. Hathcock saw him first. Seeing a glint in the sunlight of the enemy’s scope, Hathcock took aim and fired. The bullet went right through the scope and hit him in the eye — killing him instantly.
Hathcock brought the dead sniper’s gun back to camp as a trophy — but somebody stole it.
By the time he was sent back to the U.S. in 1969 having suffered severe burns while rescuing seven Marines from a burning vehicle, he’d killed 93 enemy combatants — maybe hundreds more that couldn’t be confirmed under military protocols.
While serving as a combat commander in Vietnam, retired Marine Corps Lieutenant Colonel and Annapolis graduate Kenny Moore of Hayden was part of a staff conference that included talking about the best firing techniques.
Hathcock said, “Breathe in…breath out…relax… then squeeze.”
“That’d be easy for him,” Moore said. “He had a heartbeat of only 41.”
It takes incredible training and mental toughness to become a military sniper.
Shooters and spotters are trained to work as a team, with the objective of hitting the enemy target with one shot. Before they take that shot however, there are a lot of variables that must be factored in — such as type of gun and ammunition used, distance to target, point of impact, bullet trajectory, wind conditions, humidity, elevation and even the Coriolis Force caused by the Earth’s rotation, and other factors.
Some of this is calculated by electronic and optical equipment — the rest by the sniper and spotter. Handheld computers with ballistic-prediction software help contribute to the accuracy. All of this has to be calculated quickly: adjusting the rifle for the conditions and shooting before anything changes, or the target moves.
Snipers and spotters go through rigorous physical and academic training to do all this.
They are elite warriors of the Modern Age.
U.S. Army Staff Sergeant Adelbert “Bert” Waldron of Virginia was another one of them.
He served in Vietnam as a sniper with the 9th Infantry Division, and during his eight-month tour of duty had 109 confirmed kills — the most by any American sniper during the Vietnam War.
His job in Nam was to ride shotgun on a U.S. Navy Tango “brown-water” boat in the highly dangerous Mekong Delta, infested with communist Viet Cong guerillas.
“Allied troops would launch countless search and destroy operations throughout South Vietnam in an effort to break the insurgency,” said a report in Military History Bunker, “but the VC would simply melt away into the jungles and villages…
“The VC utilized classic guerrilla tactics of ambushes, hit-and-run attacks, booby traps, bombings, and snipers to gradually inflict losses on Allied troops.
“While the Americans and their allies roamed openly in the daylight, the VC and North Vietnamese Army owned the night.”
But one night as his boat was moving along the river, Waldron shot and killed an enemy sniper in a tree 900 yards away. He was good at shooting at night. On another night, his recon patrol ran into about 40 armed Viet Cong, and a battle broke out.
Ignoring the danger, he left the patrol to take a sniper position. With his night vision scope, he could see the VC moving in the dark. He killed and wounded so many of them that they disappeared into the jungle. That earned him a Bronze Star with a “V” for Valor.
Three nights later, he was camouflaged in a sniper location when he spotted a large group of Viet Cong. Stealthily moving from one position to the next through the rice paddies, he killed 11 of them — making them think they were being attacked by multiple shooters.
He held them off for three hours before he pulled out. His actions won him the Silver Star — the military’s third highest decoration.
Bert Waldron died in obscurity in California in 1995 at age 62.
The most amazing long-range sniper shot in history took place from a tower in Baghdad in 2017.
Using a McMillan TAC-50 rifle, a Canadian sniper (unnamed for security reasons) from Joint Task Force 2 fired a shot that killed an Islamic State (IS) insurgent attacking Iraqi forces 3,871 yards away — almost 39 football fields. Video cameras and other information verified the kill.
During the Civil War, an unidentified Confederate soldier in Fort Sumter saw a Union soldier moving around 1,390 yards away at Battery Greg and took a shot at him. Probably using a Whitworth rifle, he hit the target — killing him.
Whether the shooter was a trained sniper, a good marksman, or just plain lucky is not recorded. But the deadliest American sniper in history was U.S. Navy Seal Chris Kyle from Odessa, Texas, with 160 confirmed kills in the Iraqi War. “I don’t have to psyche myself up, or do something special mentally,” he wrote in his autobiography.
“I look through the scope, get my target in the cross hairs, and kill my enemy before he kills one of my people.”
His autobiography “American Sniper” was a bestselling book, that became a hit movie starring Bradly Cooper and directed by Clint Eastwood, that received six Oscar nominations — including Best Picture.
Sadly, Kyle’s life ended tragically in 2013 at age 38 at a firing range outside Fort Worth when he and his buddy Chad Littlefield were shot and killed by a deranged ex-Marine named Eddie Ray Routh.
They’d taken Routh with them to the range to try and help him overcome personal issues and deal with his PTSD — at his mother’s request. He’d been drinking and smoking pot the previous night.
Routh, was found guilty of murder and is serving a life sentence in a Texas prison, without possibility of parole.
The nation owes a lot to our Special Forces snipers who are among the military’s most elite warriors — selflessly helping to keep America great.
Bless them all. Why a sniper has a tough job…
“Sniping is weaponized math. Although a .50 caliber sniper rifle bullet can fly as far as five miles, a host of factors…act upon the bullet as it travels. Even worse, these effects increase the farther the bullet travels. A successful sniper team operating at extreme distances must do its best to predict exactly how these factors will affect the bullet and calculate how to get the bullet back onto target.”
Where the name 'Sniper' came from…
The word appears to have originated in India in the mid-1700s, coined by the British Military when the troops were hunting the Snipe bird, which was fast and hard to shoot. Marksmen who were able to shoot the bird in flight were called “Snipers.”
U.S. Marine Corps…
"The Marine Corps has the best sniper program in the world," according to Gunnery Sergeant Richard Tisdale, staff noncommissioned officer in charge of the Scout Sniper School, with camps in California, North Carolina and Virginia. But the Army, Navy and Air Force also have snipers and might make the same claim.
What gun did Bert Waldron use in Nam?
For the gun techies: Waldron used the National Match quality M-21 with a Leatherwood 3-9X Adjustable Range Telescope (ART) graduated to 600 yards, with standard leather M1907 sling. Rock Island Arsenal converted some 1,435 of them for Vietnam in 1969, becoming the primary Army sniper rifle until 1988. The M21 was accurate to about 900 yards, firing M118 standard NATO 7.62mm rounds, using an early AN/PVS-2 Starlight night vision scope and suppressor.
Hathcock and the JFK assassination…
During the Warren Commission investigation following the assassination of President Kennedy, a mockup of the site was built at the Marine Corps sniper school at Quantico, Va., to recreate what happened. Even with the best sniper rifle, ace Marine sniper Carlos Hathcock could not duplicate assassin Lee Harvey Oswald’s fatal shot — made with a defective rifle. That finding was not included in the final Warren Report.
The book, The Giant Killer honors and highlights unique war heroes and is available on Amazon as a Paperback, Audiobook, and eBook.
Story By SYD ALBRIGHT

 

What an entirely depressing article. 

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Let's face it: Mitch McConnell has the Democrats trapped

by Andrew O'Hehir, Salon September 23, 2021

https://www.rawstory.com/let-s-face-it-mitch-mcconnell-has-the-democrats-trapped/

 

“Republicans will pretend to run on fiscal responsibility but will actually run on a bunch of culture-war bullshit and promises to rig all future elections and unquestioned loyalty to a decrepit and defeated leader they all privately think is nuts. I'm sure looking forward to that, aren't you? “

 

In the year 22, 22...

Steve Thomas

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The results of the Arizona "audit" is going to be released Friday.

What they are going to say is that because Arizona;s vote counting process is so sloppy, it's impossible to know who won the election.

And this crap is going to go on and on and on.

Steve Thomas

Angry dispute between Republicans roiling final Arizona 'audit' report

Steven Rosenfeld, Independent Media Institute September 23, 2021

https://www.rawstory.com/cyber-ninja-2655082782/

 

“Logan, Cotton, Pullen and Ayyadurai, however, will likely cast further doubt on the county's vote counting process—as Logan and Cotton did in a July 15 briefing for Arizona legislators—even as they concede that they have no evidence showing that Trump won. Whether the Senate's lawyers and Bennett can stop the report from perpetuating conspiracy theories or making factually sloppy or unsupported claims remains to be seen.”

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2 hours ago, Benjamin Cole said:

What an entirely depressing article. 

I agree. I only posted it here because of the reference to Oswald.

I remember reading at the time one of these guys boasted about blowing off the head of a woman in Iraq who was holding a baby at the time because she was between him and his target. A movie was made about this guy but this scene was not in it.

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Ben Shapiro is sort of the Steven Miller equivalent in privileged online right wing punditry.  Apparently he had great hopes for the California recall of Gavin Newsome and is now profoundly disappointed when it lost 2-1. He's spouting off about civil war, but knowing him. I wouldn't take it seriously. He's just pouting.

 

California ended up spending 276 million dollars on a recall election that was defeated almost 2 to one. Think of how many homeless people could be fed and temporarily housed with that money!

For over a year the recall Newsome movement put up their booths at highway junctions or sort of  picketed at freeway overpasses with signs. I saw a group  2 days after the election on a freeway overpass.I didn't get a good look, though one of the signs said Infowars.com.

i was driving around ranch country near Atascadero  Cal. the day after the election. It's very pretty country but right now bone dry. I saw this sign on the  side of the road.

 

IMG_0260.jpg

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5 hours ago, Kirk Gallaway said:

Ben Shapiro is sort of the Steven Miller equivalent in privileged online right wing punditry.  Apparently he had great hopes for the California recall of Gavin Newsome and is now profoundly disappointed when it lost 2-1. He's spouting off about civil war, but knowing him. I wouldn't take it seriously. He's just pouting.

 

California ended up spending 276 million dollars on a recall election that was defeated almost 2 to one. Think of how many homeless people could be fed and temporarily housed with that money!

For over a year the recall Newsome movement put up their booths at highway junctions or sort of  picketed at freeway overpasses with signs. I saw a group  2 days after the election on a freeway overpass.I didn't get a good look, though one of the signs said Infowars.com.

i was driving around ranch country near Atascadero  Cal. the day after the election. It's very pretty country but right now bone dry. I saw this sign on the  side of the road.

 

IMG_0260.jpg

Kirk,

     How did California Republicans manage to get this ridiculous, costly recall measure on a ballot?

     It sounds like another brainchild of one of the Koch-funded "think tanks."

     From what I've read, Newsom could have been deposed with less than 50% of the vote, and Elder could have replaced him with 24%.

      File it under, "minority rule," "the modern GOP war on democracy, etc."

      What's worse is the current GOP Debt-Ceiling Scam II in Congress this week -- a replay of the nonsense that resulted in a downgrade in the U.S. credit rating-- and a 10% plunge in the stock markets-- in the summer of 2011.

      I remember it well.

     Republican David Brooks wrote perhaps the greatest op-ed of the past decade that summer-- the ultimate take down of the Koch-funded Tea Party House.

     It deserves a place in the annals of American history.  (Re-printed for non-subscribers.)

The Mother of All No-Brainers

  • July 4, 2011

The Republicans have changed American politics since they took control of the House of Representatives. They have put spending restraint and debt reduction at the top of the national agenda. They have sparked a discussion on entitlement reform. They have turned a bill to raise the debt limit into an opportunity to put the U.S. on a stable fiscal course.

Republican leaders have also proved to be effective negotiators. They have been tough and inflexible and forced the Democrats to come to them. The Democrats have agreed to tie budget cuts to the debt ceiling bill. They have agreed not to raise tax rates. They have agreed to a roughly 3-to-1 rate of spending cuts to revenue increases, an astonishing concession.

Moreover, many important Democrats are open to a truly large budget deal. President Obama has a strong incentive to reach a deal so he can campaign in 2012 as a moderate. The Senate majority leader, Harry Reid, has talked about supporting a debt reduction measure of $3 trillion or even $4 trillion if the Republicans meet him part way. There are Democrats in the White House and elsewhere who would be willing to accept Medicare cuts if the Republicans would be willing to increase revenues.

If the Republican Party were a normal party, it would take advantage of this amazing moment. It is being offered the deal of the century: trillions of dollars in spending cuts in exchange for a few hundred billion dollars of revenue increases.

A normal Republican Party would seize the opportunity to put a long-term limit on the growth of government. It would seize the opportunity to put the country on a sound fiscal footing. It would seize the opportunity to do these things without putting any real crimp in economic growth.

The party is not being asked to raise marginal tax rates in a way that might pervert incentives. On the contrary, Republicans are merely being asked to close loopholes and eliminate tax expenditures that are themselves distortionary.

This, as I say, is the mother of all no-brainers.

But we can have no confidence that the Republicans will seize this opportunity. That’s because the Republican Party may no longer be a normal party. Over the past few years, it has been infected by a faction that is more of a psychological protest than a practical, governing alternative.

The members of this movement do not accept the logic of compromise, no matter how sweet the terms. If you ask them to raise taxes by an inch in order to cut government by a foot, they will say no. If you ask them to raise taxes by an inch to cut government by a yard, they will still say no.

The members of this movement do not accept the legitimacy of scholars and intellectual authorities. A thousand impartial experts may tell them that a default on the debt would have calamitous effects, far worse than raising tax revenues a bit. But the members of this movement refuse to believe it.

The members of this movement have no sense of moral decency. A nation makes a sacred pledge to pay the money back when it borrows money. But the members of this movement talk blandly of default and are willing to stain their nation’s honor.

The members of this movement have no economic theory worthy of the name. Economists have identified many factors that contribute to economic growth, ranging from the productivity of the work force to the share of private savings that is available for private investment. Tax levels matter, but they are far from the only or even the most important factor.

But to members of this movement, tax levels are everything. Members of this tendency have taken a small piece of economic policy and turned it into a sacred fixation. They are willing to cut education and research to preserve tax expenditures. Manufacturing employment is cratering even as output rises, but members of this movement somehow believe such problems can be addressed so long as they continue to worship their idol.

Over the past week, Democrats have stopped making concessions. They are coming to the conclusion that if the Republicans are fanatics then they better be fanatics, too.

The struggles of the next few weeks are about what sort of party the G.O.P. is — a normal conservative party or an odd protest movement that has separated itself from normal governance, the normal rules of evidence and the ancient habits of our nation.

If the debt ceiling talks fail, independent voters will see that Democrats were willing to compromise but Republicans were not. If responsible Republicans don’t take control, independents will conclude that Republican fanaticism caused this default. They will conclude that Republicans are not fit to govern.

And they will be right.

Edited by W. Niederhut
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